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Divorcing yourself from recruiters forever

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0 Votes
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Divorcing yourself from recruiters forever

IT.Consultant
Hi all.

I've almost reached the boiling point with recruiters. Most know nothing about the jobs you apply for, don't market you properly, don't pay you fairly, or usually aren't even responsive at all. Rather than continue adding to long list of gripes about them, I'm seeking ways to eliminate my dependence on them by persuading clients to deal with me directly.

What I'm searching for are reasons why a client would deal with me directly instead of forcing me to go through a recruiter. For those who have succeeded in overcoming this problem, could you provide some practical examples of things you've done?

Your suggestions may take a long time to implement and the results may not be immediate or guaranteed. But, at least I'm willing to commit myself to the right path.

For those who have nagivated this obstacle or know of others who have, feel free to contribute. Thanks.
  • +
    1 Votes
    Oz_Media

    NO offense to you, your post is a legitimate issue, but I have been reiterating myself for 8 years now and it gets to be work after a while. Maybe I should just write a White Paper for TR and can refer to that, hmmmm.


    anyway, I understand and know your frustration very well. I have taught a youth job club, have worked as a BDM for a major recruiter and have always commanded my own career, which has been everything from a major company mascot to a BDM to sales manager to Network Admin to....you get the picture. I change careers on aq whim, whatever floats my boat is what I do, including sweepign chimneys when I learned to do my own one year and found myself all over the neighbourhood. anyway, enough about me, this is about working around recruiters.

    Recruiters are hired by companies that I usually have no interest in working for anyway, it shows an out of touch style of finding future team members and doesn't allow your individual assets to be the focus of bringing you in.

    What do I do?

    Write out a pitch, who I am, what I have done and (after researchign teh company I am applying to) what I can do for the company. SHORT, real short, four or five well constructed lines (you can change and adjust your 'pitch' as you go.

    Then find companies you WANT to work for, research teh company and call them up with your 'pitch'.

    Never pitch the ***** (sorry to receptionists).

    When the receptionist answers, try "Hi, can you tell me the name of the manager there?" or president/owner determined in yuor research. GET A NAME.

    Then just ask if he/she is available. If no, fair enough, just ask when the better time to call is. Usually the gatekeeper will ask you if there's a message "He's in and out a lot, can i get your name and have him call you?"

    Be polite and give your name and number, but also explain that YOU are in and out a lot, and is it better to try back in the mornings or is he more likely to be around in the afternoons? Perhaps it'sjust hit or miss?

    (Lots of work and we haven't even begun yet, but just like any sales job, this is the crappiest part anyway.)

    So now you have aname and hopefully a better time to call back, remember the guy MAY actually call you back, in which case have your 'pitch' written down and by the phone. Don't cheat! I have been in sales for over 20 years, I am fluent on the phone and in meetings and presentations but you MUST write your pitch down, you should not ad lib this one...yet.

    Phew, still with me? Sorry to be so long winded but these are proven steps and must be followed in order to be effective.

    CONTACT! okay you have called an average of 15-20 companies EVERY DAY, and worked this style in. By now you will be getting call backs, scheduling times to call your prospects etc. You should use a decent scheduler or Outlook to manage your calls and call back dates, contacts.

    So the excitement is starting to build you have employers CALLING YOU!!!! Way cool! B-)
    I've done it for so many years now, that I have employers callign me back 1 year later to see if I am availabel YET, or if I know anyone else I would recommend. They offer to pay mroe money if I ever get tired of where I am at ,they even buy me lunch and try to take me on now. MARKET yourself, YOU are an asset to be sold, and they will soon see the benefits in hiring you.

    Get your pitch into the owners, managers, presidents and you will win, not every contact but you will win, its a numbers game.
    Now the fun part!

    Pitch your prospect and ask for a time that you could drop by "I will be down your way for a meeting on Thursday, would you be willing to take a few minutes just to meet with me and accept my resume?" If he bust on Thursday, 'no problem, I can imagine how busy you are. WHEN would be a better time for me to come by." (Be assertive and don't ask IF there's a better time to drop by, just ask WHEN. He'll tell you if there's no hope, in which case you haven't watsed time and can just move on)

    Get in the door, meet with the guy and sell yourself. Tips for a meeting: Explain what you do and WHY you chose them as a possible employer (you are picking THEM, not the other way around). Explain your goals, that you have been looking into their company and oufnd that you had some tools to bring to teh table that you feel they could use such as......and that you feel you would be a good fit in their organization") I usually lok for something in their culture that shines out, About Us pages are good for determining that.

    Now, almost every manager or owner you get on the phone will be kind and recptive to this approach, they are in business afterall and that's how to conduct business, you ususally get brownie points for your frank and concise approach. But not ALL contacts will love you, some will be cold and distant, just play their game and move on politely.

    I have had meetings, usually lunch is a good one because it is casual and more consultative than an 'interview', where the contact says THEY can't help me but Mr. Foxx at ABC company may be interested (these guys all know others contacts that can help). A good way to get ot that point is to simply ask, "I really appreciate you taking time to meet/speak with me, and I understand that you don't have any room for me now, would you know anyone else that can benefit from my sekillset or do you have any ideas as to how I could enter your field of work?" ASK, it isn't hard, you've already done the hard part (cold calls, groan!)and this is just a chat with a possible business associate. You will be shocked (I guarantee it, at how many of these contacts will actually help you out or WANT to help you out. I foten don't have ot ask for a referral as it is offered to me before i have a chance to ask. But DON'T FORGET to ask, if not offered.

    You WILL find work this way, this method shows a greater sucess rate than ANY other method, newspaper ads 2%, recruiters about the same. Don't chase ads, find companies you want to work for and approach them, advertising or not. I have been hired by companeis with no intent on hiring anybody, just because of my keen approach and abilaity to sel lthem my skills and help them see a need to hire me.

    The greatest part of all of this is that you generall get paid a lot more this way. You negin by creating interest and value, by the time they are ocnsidering hiring you they will ask YOU, "So, how much will this cost me?" YOU are in control of teh interview and hiring process now, not a recruiter, not a headhunter but YOU. YOU dictate salary, YOU dictate benefits etc. it is YOUR job.

    Remeber, when you go through a recruiter, they get an average of 14% of their placed employees wages. So if a company WAS offering 80K for a new employee, they will be paying you far less through a recruiter becaus ethey have to pay the recruiter some of your money too, they don't lay more, they just take the recruiters cut out of what they are willign to pay for the position.

    So there it is in teh Readers Digest condensed version anyway. Good luck and I do promise you, IF yuo follow these steps, contact 20 cold calls each day and work them properly, finding out when you get cut off and adjusting your approach until you are pitching every call, you WILL win, you WILL come out on top and you WILL be paid more than an employee that depends on job ads or recruiters. It has been proven time and time again.

    Work hard and enjoy your new position!

    +
    0 Votes
    drowningnotwaving

    ... the plebocite came up with 100 reasons why "sales techniques" didn't work in the IT arena.

    Mainly from people who complain about recruiters, I may add ...

    IT.Consultant - if you follow Oz's suggestions you'll have better jobs for companies that you want to work for, throughout your career.

    Warning: as with anything worthwhile, it takes practise and persistence. But then again, maybe you'll get the 'bluebird' on your first phone call!!

    Good luck. :)

    +
    0 Votes

    Oz

    santeewelding

    You scare the crap out of me, in a good way.

    +
    0 Votes
    crawk

    Please distill your technique into a single article. I've sent copies of your individual posts to a number of friends and associates in the job market; each one covers the topic but is slightly different. I'd love for you to address it comprehensively on TR. My friends and family would be less annoyed with me. Economies around the world would improve! Billions and billions would benefit! Rivers and seas would cease boiling; cats and dogs would live together in peace!

    +
    0 Votes
    Gate keeper

    but it sounds like some valuable advice .. I'll give it a try when I'm done with my current gig.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    thank you for imparting your wisdom!

    Another thing I'd like to add is that you have never put yourself in a situation where you financially depend on recruiters to place you. So, you may need a good-sized cash reserve (and a tolerance for criticism and rejection).

    What I mean is that, in the beginning, your suggestions are much harder to follow and will take longer to see results. Finding a recruiter who will place at a cheap rate with a questionable client is much easier and quicker.

    I will consider your approach, though it's probably easier for marketing guy like you to do than for a techie like me.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    I didn't share this information with you.

    I came across an article that discuss other approaches to bypassing recruiters. It is called "Other Sources of Employment for .NET Jobs (Besides Recruiters)". The link to it appears below. Enjoy.

    http://www.dotnetheaven.com/News/NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=210

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Oz's approach, I've learnt to deal with recruiters in the UK. Many of them I simply ignore, I've even blocked some, after yet another stupid email, I've told them to politely f*** off and never bother me again.

    My key points in dealing with them are don't put any restrictions in their client database, most of them aren't even up on basic geography. Get those buzzwords in the cv/resume. Have a clear idea at least what you are not looking for, ask those questions and get rid of them. Refresh you resume as soon as the number of hits (good or bad) starts to drop. I popped mine on monster and I was inundated for about three weeks, starting to drop off now, so a bit of rewording is in order.


    The obvious answer to your question, is if your client goes direct they don't hav to pay for you being found.

    So then it becomes how do you get noticed, so you have Oz's tried and tested, or you have networking, or you pay up front. No idea about the US market, but I've never had any of those who offer that service even start to convince me they were worth more than about 10p.

    Dealing with recruiters is an art, there's a lot more to it than throw your cv into a job board and wait for the calls to roll in.

    If you want that to happen, you have to appeal to their undoubtedly simple minds.

    +
    0 Votes
    Oz_Media

    The whole reason it I so effective is that it takes people OUT of their comfort zone and makes them transparent as they toss it all out on the table to be scrutinized and criticized.

    The excercise builds some real, lasting personal strengths and skills though and it just gets easier every time. Even after the first week, it is a piece of cake, by the end of the second week, you are pitching like a pro and full of energy and confidence, I think that's why it is so successful in two weeks.

    With the hiring process more drawn out now that it used to be, you will usually have to wait longer for results but will often find it is a company you contacted in the second week that is the keeper in the end.

    +
    0 Votes

    I've never had to push my resume. I've
    always worked off prior contacts and word of
    mouth recommendations. It's a lot easier to
    get the terms you want when they come to you
    instead of vice versa.

    With that out of the way, if I had to
    actively seek work in a market where I'm not
    widely known, I would still want to market
    from strength rather than need. As in love,
    desperation can be read in your voice and it
    drives away potential partners faster than a
    social disease.

    It's helpful if you know something about the
    kinds of struggles your prospect may be
    facing. As I recall, you're a .NET
    developer, so you'd naturally look for
    companies that are actively developing .NET
    applications. You can bet that any one of
    them has issues with managing large-scale
    (whatever that means for them) design and
    keeping up with the best ways to do things
    using the latest .NET version. If those are
    some of your strengths, then I would casually
    present those as benefits you might be able
    to provide to them. But just ask the
    question -- don't be pushy.

    At least, that would be my approach.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    It sounds like you're a master of the soft sell and sort of push marketing strategy.

    Someday, I hope to reach that point, which will take practice. I realize that I need to continue following I have set path before me, which is to serve the IT needs of the healthcare industry. What I need to learn is to communicate the advantages of dealing with a specialist like me to my target audience - and as you hinted at, showing my IT solutions to translate into benefits for my clients.

    I think that my reputation is good enough to have made me this successful, but what I need is to practice relationship-building to the point where opportunities passively come to me instead of me actively seeking them.

    +
    0 Votes

    I think most companies would rather not go
    through a recruiter, if only they knew how to
    find qualified people on their own. That's
    where you can help them, by finding qualified
    prospects on your own.

    But how do you find them? Word of mouth and
    knowing someone who is involved with them
    have worked best for me. I've never tried
    cold calling, but it's been done to me enough
    times that I know I only resent the
    interruption.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    Well, I dealt with them twice, and that was it. I went with one of the "top" recruting companies, and they didnt do squat! It was actually funny, looking back. At first there was an interview on the phone, and you had to pass that to get to the second interview. Well, I ended up telling a true story, about a situation that I encountered. When I went in for the interview he pitched it off as his own back to me word for word, OOPS! Needless to say I called him on it, and then he changed directions real quick.

    The second recruiting interview I went to lasted all of 2 minutes. I went in there, and it felt like the guy was a pro sales man. Just blowing smoke up my A**... Sorry but I dont need smoke, I needed a job. I ended up sending my resume to a couple companies, and got a job my self!

    The point is don't lie, and people can smell BS a mile a way!

    +
    0 Votes
    Neon Samurai

    The recruiter couldn't find a viable possition in the job listings. The recruiter offered a possition within their own company then "went with the other applicant" at the last minute.

    The friend went back to running there own job hunt and had calls coming in the day after they posted on the local job find website of choice.

    hm...

  • +
    1 Votes
    Oz_Media

    NO offense to you, your post is a legitimate issue, but I have been reiterating myself for 8 years now and it gets to be work after a while. Maybe I should just write a White Paper for TR and can refer to that, hmmmm.


    anyway, I understand and know your frustration very well. I have taught a youth job club, have worked as a BDM for a major recruiter and have always commanded my own career, which has been everything from a major company mascot to a BDM to sales manager to Network Admin to....you get the picture. I change careers on aq whim, whatever floats my boat is what I do, including sweepign chimneys when I learned to do my own one year and found myself all over the neighbourhood. anyway, enough about me, this is about working around recruiters.

    Recruiters are hired by companies that I usually have no interest in working for anyway, it shows an out of touch style of finding future team members and doesn't allow your individual assets to be the focus of bringing you in.

    What do I do?

    Write out a pitch, who I am, what I have done and (after researchign teh company I am applying to) what I can do for the company. SHORT, real short, four or five well constructed lines (you can change and adjust your 'pitch' as you go.

    Then find companies you WANT to work for, research teh company and call them up with your 'pitch'.

    Never pitch the ***** (sorry to receptionists).

    When the receptionist answers, try "Hi, can you tell me the name of the manager there?" or president/owner determined in yuor research. GET A NAME.

    Then just ask if he/she is available. If no, fair enough, just ask when the better time to call is. Usually the gatekeeper will ask you if there's a message "He's in and out a lot, can i get your name and have him call you?"

    Be polite and give your name and number, but also explain that YOU are in and out a lot, and is it better to try back in the mornings or is he more likely to be around in the afternoons? Perhaps it'sjust hit or miss?

    (Lots of work and we haven't even begun yet, but just like any sales job, this is the crappiest part anyway.)

    So now you have aname and hopefully a better time to call back, remember the guy MAY actually call you back, in which case have your 'pitch' written down and by the phone. Don't cheat! I have been in sales for over 20 years, I am fluent on the phone and in meetings and presentations but you MUST write your pitch down, you should not ad lib this one...yet.

    Phew, still with me? Sorry to be so long winded but these are proven steps and must be followed in order to be effective.

    CONTACT! okay you have called an average of 15-20 companies EVERY DAY, and worked this style in. By now you will be getting call backs, scheduling times to call your prospects etc. You should use a decent scheduler or Outlook to manage your calls and call back dates, contacts.

    So the excitement is starting to build you have employers CALLING YOU!!!! Way cool! B-)
    I've done it for so many years now, that I have employers callign me back 1 year later to see if I am availabel YET, or if I know anyone else I would recommend. They offer to pay mroe money if I ever get tired of where I am at ,they even buy me lunch and try to take me on now. MARKET yourself, YOU are an asset to be sold, and they will soon see the benefits in hiring you.

    Get your pitch into the owners, managers, presidents and you will win, not every contact but you will win, its a numbers game.
    Now the fun part!

    Pitch your prospect and ask for a time that you could drop by "I will be down your way for a meeting on Thursday, would you be willing to take a few minutes just to meet with me and accept my resume?" If he bust on Thursday, 'no problem, I can imagine how busy you are. WHEN would be a better time for me to come by." (Be assertive and don't ask IF there's a better time to drop by, just ask WHEN. He'll tell you if there's no hope, in which case you haven't watsed time and can just move on)

    Get in the door, meet with the guy and sell yourself. Tips for a meeting: Explain what you do and WHY you chose them as a possible employer (you are picking THEM, not the other way around). Explain your goals, that you have been looking into their company and oufnd that you had some tools to bring to teh table that you feel they could use such as......and that you feel you would be a good fit in their organization") I usually lok for something in their culture that shines out, About Us pages are good for determining that.

    Now, almost every manager or owner you get on the phone will be kind and recptive to this approach, they are in business afterall and that's how to conduct business, you ususally get brownie points for your frank and concise approach. But not ALL contacts will love you, some will be cold and distant, just play their game and move on politely.

    I have had meetings, usually lunch is a good one because it is casual and more consultative than an 'interview', where the contact says THEY can't help me but Mr. Foxx at ABC company may be interested (these guys all know others contacts that can help). A good way to get ot that point is to simply ask, "I really appreciate you taking time to meet/speak with me, and I understand that you don't have any room for me now, would you know anyone else that can benefit from my sekillset or do you have any ideas as to how I could enter your field of work?" ASK, it isn't hard, you've already done the hard part (cold calls, groan!)and this is just a chat with a possible business associate. You will be shocked (I guarantee it, at how many of these contacts will actually help you out or WANT to help you out. I foten don't have ot ask for a referral as it is offered to me before i have a chance to ask. But DON'T FORGET to ask, if not offered.

    You WILL find work this way, this method shows a greater sucess rate than ANY other method, newspaper ads 2%, recruiters about the same. Don't chase ads, find companies you want to work for and approach them, advertising or not. I have been hired by companeis with no intent on hiring anybody, just because of my keen approach and abilaity to sel lthem my skills and help them see a need to hire me.

    The greatest part of all of this is that you generall get paid a lot more this way. You negin by creating interest and value, by the time they are ocnsidering hiring you they will ask YOU, "So, how much will this cost me?" YOU are in control of teh interview and hiring process now, not a recruiter, not a headhunter but YOU. YOU dictate salary, YOU dictate benefits etc. it is YOUR job.

    Remeber, when you go through a recruiter, they get an average of 14% of their placed employees wages. So if a company WAS offering 80K for a new employee, they will be paying you far less through a recruiter becaus ethey have to pay the recruiter some of your money too, they don't lay more, they just take the recruiters cut out of what they are willign to pay for the position.

    So there it is in teh Readers Digest condensed version anyway. Good luck and I do promise you, IF yuo follow these steps, contact 20 cold calls each day and work them properly, finding out when you get cut off and adjusting your approach until you are pitching every call, you WILL win, you WILL come out on top and you WILL be paid more than an employee that depends on job ads or recruiters. It has been proven time and time again.

    Work hard and enjoy your new position!

    +
    0 Votes
    drowningnotwaving

    ... the plebocite came up with 100 reasons why "sales techniques" didn't work in the IT arena.

    Mainly from people who complain about recruiters, I may add ...

    IT.Consultant - if you follow Oz's suggestions you'll have better jobs for companies that you want to work for, throughout your career.

    Warning: as with anything worthwhile, it takes practise and persistence. But then again, maybe you'll get the 'bluebird' on your first phone call!!

    Good luck. :)

    +
    0 Votes

    Oz

    santeewelding

    You scare the crap out of me, in a good way.

    +
    0 Votes
    crawk

    Please distill your technique into a single article. I've sent copies of your individual posts to a number of friends and associates in the job market; each one covers the topic but is slightly different. I'd love for you to address it comprehensively on TR. My friends and family would be less annoyed with me. Economies around the world would improve! Billions and billions would benefit! Rivers and seas would cease boiling; cats and dogs would live together in peace!

    +
    0 Votes
    Gate keeper

    but it sounds like some valuable advice .. I'll give it a try when I'm done with my current gig.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    thank you for imparting your wisdom!

    Another thing I'd like to add is that you have never put yourself in a situation where you financially depend on recruiters to place you. So, you may need a good-sized cash reserve (and a tolerance for criticism and rejection).

    What I mean is that, in the beginning, your suggestions are much harder to follow and will take longer to see results. Finding a recruiter who will place at a cheap rate with a questionable client is much easier and quicker.

    I will consider your approach, though it's probably easier for marketing guy like you to do than for a techie like me.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    I didn't share this information with you.

    I came across an article that discuss other approaches to bypassing recruiters. It is called "Other Sources of Employment for .NET Jobs (Besides Recruiters)". The link to it appears below. Enjoy.

    http://www.dotnetheaven.com/News/NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=210

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Oz's approach, I've learnt to deal with recruiters in the UK. Many of them I simply ignore, I've even blocked some, after yet another stupid email, I've told them to politely f*** off and never bother me again.

    My key points in dealing with them are don't put any restrictions in their client database, most of them aren't even up on basic geography. Get those buzzwords in the cv/resume. Have a clear idea at least what you are not looking for, ask those questions and get rid of them. Refresh you resume as soon as the number of hits (good or bad) starts to drop. I popped mine on monster and I was inundated for about three weeks, starting to drop off now, so a bit of rewording is in order.


    The obvious answer to your question, is if your client goes direct they don't hav to pay for you being found.

    So then it becomes how do you get noticed, so you have Oz's tried and tested, or you have networking, or you pay up front. No idea about the US market, but I've never had any of those who offer that service even start to convince me they were worth more than about 10p.

    Dealing with recruiters is an art, there's a lot more to it than throw your cv into a job board and wait for the calls to roll in.

    If you want that to happen, you have to appeal to their undoubtedly simple minds.

    +
    0 Votes
    Oz_Media

    The whole reason it I so effective is that it takes people OUT of their comfort zone and makes them transparent as they toss it all out on the table to be scrutinized and criticized.

    The excercise builds some real, lasting personal strengths and skills though and it just gets easier every time. Even after the first week, it is a piece of cake, by the end of the second week, you are pitching like a pro and full of energy and confidence, I think that's why it is so successful in two weeks.

    With the hiring process more drawn out now that it used to be, you will usually have to wait longer for results but will often find it is a company you contacted in the second week that is the keeper in the end.

    +
    0 Votes

    I've never had to push my resume. I've
    always worked off prior contacts and word of
    mouth recommendations. It's a lot easier to
    get the terms you want when they come to you
    instead of vice versa.

    With that out of the way, if I had to
    actively seek work in a market where I'm not
    widely known, I would still want to market
    from strength rather than need. As in love,
    desperation can be read in your voice and it
    drives away potential partners faster than a
    social disease.

    It's helpful if you know something about the
    kinds of struggles your prospect may be
    facing. As I recall, you're a .NET
    developer, so you'd naturally look for
    companies that are actively developing .NET
    applications. You can bet that any one of
    them has issues with managing large-scale
    (whatever that means for them) design and
    keeping up with the best ways to do things
    using the latest .NET version. If those are
    some of your strengths, then I would casually
    present those as benefits you might be able
    to provide to them. But just ask the
    question -- don't be pushy.

    At least, that would be my approach.

    +
    0 Votes
    IT.Consultant

    It sounds like you're a master of the soft sell and sort of push marketing strategy.

    Someday, I hope to reach that point, which will take practice. I realize that I need to continue following I have set path before me, which is to serve the IT needs of the healthcare industry. What I need to learn is to communicate the advantages of dealing with a specialist like me to my target audience - and as you hinted at, showing my IT solutions to translate into benefits for my clients.

    I think that my reputation is good enough to have made me this successful, but what I need is to practice relationship-building to the point where opportunities passively come to me instead of me actively seeking them.

    +
    0 Votes

    I think most companies would rather not go
    through a recruiter, if only they knew how to
    find qualified people on their own. That's
    where you can help them, by finding qualified
    prospects on your own.

    But how do you find them? Word of mouth and
    knowing someone who is involved with them
    have worked best for me. I've never tried
    cold calling, but it's been done to me enough
    times that I know I only resent the
    interruption.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    Well, I dealt with them twice, and that was it. I went with one of the "top" recruting companies, and they didnt do squat! It was actually funny, looking back. At first there was an interview on the phone, and you had to pass that to get to the second interview. Well, I ended up telling a true story, about a situation that I encountered. When I went in for the interview he pitched it off as his own back to me word for word, OOPS! Needless to say I called him on it, and then he changed directions real quick.

    The second recruiting interview I went to lasted all of 2 minutes. I went in there, and it felt like the guy was a pro sales man. Just blowing smoke up my A**... Sorry but I dont need smoke, I needed a job. I ended up sending my resume to a couple companies, and got a job my self!

    The point is don't lie, and people can smell BS a mile a way!

    +
    0 Votes
    Neon Samurai

    The recruiter couldn't find a viable possition in the job listings. The recruiter offered a possition within their own company then "went with the other applicant" at the last minute.

    The friend went back to running there own job hunt and had calls coming in the day after they posted on the local job find website of choice.

    hm...