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Does TR accept input normally on what topics to usee for blog/articles?

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Does TR accept input normally on what topics to usee for blog/articles?

DanLM
I'm not making this a question on purpose, because I really want to know what everyone thinks. I also know that their have been TR representives that have asked what we wanted at various times. BUT, is there a way for members to provide input into what area's that we would like see articles/blogs.

For my purpose, I'm specifically talking about tech topics. I know that others may be interested in other things.

So, is there a way to ask for articles on a specific subject? If not, do you think there should be?

Dan
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    Toni Bowers

    TechRepublic more than welcomes any ideas you would like to see covered in articles and blogs. You can post your ideas in the discussion area as you did with this question. But you can also private message and I will pass the ideas on to the appropriate parties within TR.

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    DanLM

    Lol, how about the following suggestions.

    For a small business:
    Virtual Operating systems.
    I would like to see an article that possibly addressed the pro's and con's of using VM for a production server, and not as a test server. In my circumstance, I would have a backup crystal server on the MS while the primary OS would support some in house/lan developed applications which would utilize higher resources.
    1). There is both open source and vendor supported software. In what instance's would you consider using the open source over something that a vendor offered with paid support.
    2). Possibly address some high points on segregation of resources. Ie, hardware, access rights, shared ip, seperate ip's?
    3). Benefits that can be gained for a small business(yea, I know... cost) from utilizing VM over separate servers. The cons, or downfalls of utilizing a VM solution.

    RAID Units.
    1). I've been doing some reading(actually a lot) on raid. I pretty much know that there are different raid technology, and which is probably most appropriate for where I work. But, I would like to possibly see a review of the various Raid hardware units. Not necessarily by brand name, but why you would use one configuration over another. Ie, drive rack plugged into a raid card versus a raid unit with a separate OS controlling the raid.

    MySql.
    Since 5.0, MySql has become more mainstream with some of the functions that it offers. Ie. Stored procedures. Id like to see some articles on various coding tips. Different languages possibly shown... Personally, Id like to see Perl covered. But, I know that various people use VB with it. We use Java here at work with MySql. But, I think that a lot of coding techniques that are being used are not utilizing all the features that are beginning to appear with MySql that are more in line with it's big brothers like Oracle.

    Home servers
    Ok, I'm prejudice. I like Unix and BSD. But, some possible options here for the home user wanting to set up their own home server.
    IE.
    What to do when your home storage requirements outgrow individual drives. Software versus Hardware raid units. A cheep way to set them up.
    Securing your home server. I have my home server connected to the Internet so that I can access it from anywhere via SSH or FTP. I also run Apache from it. I can flat out tell you that the script kiddies pound the daylights out of it, I'm always tweaking my firewall settings. So, an article on how to only allow specific ports open at the router and why only those ports. Steps that can be taken at the server level to secure yourself.

    Open Source
    George covers a lot of the hot issues(security/release's) with regard to Microsoft. It would be nice to have say a regular article/blog on security issues that arise with regard to open source. Apache, PHP(I do not trust it), various UNIX/Linux Os's(BSD wifi issue discovered. Something that would allow the members have one place to go for major OpenSource os/applications to be informed of things like this.

    Chuckle, is that enough suggestions? Lol, I have more if you want.

    Dan

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    georgeou

    1. We're going to be starting a whole section on Virtualization with Xen, Virtual Iron, Microsoft, and VMware.

    2. I'll do some more stuff on RAID and storage in general. Things like FC SAN, iSCSI, ATA over Ethernet.

    3. We'll find someone to do more stuff on MySQL.

    4. I and others will do some things on home servers. Since Microsoft doesn't even play in this market, it will be almost 100% Linux based solutions.

    5. We will be doing more Linux coverage with actual how-to guides. This next quarter, we will start with a section on implementing wireless security with Linux.


    If you have more suggestions, it is ALWAYS welcome :). These are great suggestions and we're here to serve people like you so please don't be shy about asking for things.

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    DanLM

    Like I said, most of these suggestions were geared toward what I could use. I brought up MySql because I have watched the thread's here and know that others use it also. But, nowhere have I seen the new capabilities being utilized in the conversations.

    I personally think Microsoft is missing out on the home server market. I personally have over 800 gig right now, and I know others that have more. Just covering security on a home server would be beneficial. Having everything stored in one place opens itself up to huge disasters. Backup solutions would be nice in this area also.

    From TR's stand point(marketing money), I would go after MySql to see if you could advertise for them. They are a for profit organization that collects it's income through support. I would think that they would be interested in the exposure on a respectable IT forum other then what is said within the forums.

    And another suggestion, Oracle. As much as I think it's a resource hog and a pig to maintain, a boat load of businesses(small/large) use it. Guest writer from them would be nice once and awhile. Just the knowledge of the additioinal capabilities from release to release is worth it's weight in gold. Not counting the various tweaking or code tricks that they must have a store house of.

    Thanks again.

    Dan

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    georgeou

    "I personally think Microsoft is missing out on the home server market. I personally have over 800 gig right now, and I know others that have more. Just covering security on a home server would be beneficial. Having everything stored in one place opens itself up to huge disasters. Backup solutions would be nice in this area also."

    Hey, you're not alone. I'm in the same boat as you. I'll definitely be covering this.

    "From TR's stand point(marketing money), I would go after MySql to see if you could advertise for them"

    Well I can't speak for TR marketing but I will say this. The happier TR users are the more of them stick around and the more of them join up. There is no commercial negative to that.

    "And another suggestion, Oracle. As much as I think it's a resource hog and a pig to maintain, a boat load of businesses(small/large) use it. Guest writer from them would be nice once and awhile. Just the knowledge of the additional capabilities from release to release is worth it's weight in gold. Not counting the various tweaking or code tricks that they must have a store house of."

    Hey it's not just you, IT IS A RESOURCE HOG! I was one of the first people in 2001 to deploy Oracle 11i and it was JRE based with a special Java initiator that had to be installed. It was suppose to be "client less" self service but the installer is so confusing the users were botching it half the time and the installer didn't clean out the old versions that was causing problems. I actually had to use WISE to wrap the installer in to a silent install and push it out via Active Directory. Then I had to set Active Directory Group Policy for IE to globally trust the 11i server. Furthermore, everyone had to be upgraded to a minimum of 256 or 512 MBs of RAM and the network backbone had to be upgraded to gigabit to accommodate passable load times in Oracle 11i. But even then it still took 30 seconds to load when it was already cached and I have Windows XP systems that boot faster than that. As for the DB engine for server and desktop deployment, it was always a nightmare because it shoved a ton of services and process startups in to Windows XP. Oh, and did I mention the strong arm threatening sales tactics they used on us to force us to renegotiate our contracts so that we'd pay them a ton of money. They would use words like "you're out of compliance" and threaten to audit us.

    OK sorry about the rant, I tend to get carried away when someone says the word Oracle. But you're right that it is a major player in IT and we really should have more Oracle content. I will bring it up with our content team. Thanks!

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    0 Votes

    Dan -

    I just put out on article on the eWay TK-63T appliance (http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10877_11-6143752.html) a few days ago, and I am working on an article on turning it into a SOHO networking appliance. You may want to keep an eye out for that. Depending on the feedback I get from it, I may do more articles using this unit. And I am going to be building a new *NIX (probably FreeBSD) server at home soon, and I may get an article or two out of that as well!

    A lot of my article idea actually come from feedback to my blog posts, so it is valuable to me to have folks comment on the blogs!

    Regarding MySQL, my experience has been that it does not really matter what language is talking to the DB too much, as long as the driver (ODBC, ADO, JDBC, etc.) isn't a mess.

    J.Ja

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    DanLM

    Unfortunally, what I am seeing is specific to hardware brand names. Ie, HP or IBM. At least that's what I am reading now.

    I would prefer discussing VM from the stand point of generic host machine.

    If that makes any since. Oh well, read on dan... Read on.

    dan

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    lifesablast

    I have been looking on and off for info on home security systems. But when I do search on "home security" I find lots of material on locking wireless networks, locking down servers, malware info, etc.

    But what I'm really interested in is what I need to install say 2 cameras that can record images of would-be thieves around my home. One camera needs to be set up in a building 1000 ft away and send remote images to a PC set up in my house (dedicated or not?). What hardware/software do I need? I don't want to buy a canned system. I'm sure I can build it myself but I just need a starting point with some info.

    Or is this subject not really content for TR?
    TIA for any info.

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    0 Votes
    georgeou

    There are cheap PCI cards with multiple analog video in or cheap IP cameras. I'm not sure what you'd use for software though.

    We've never done anything like this, but we might be able to do something that works for businesses and that in turn could be used for the home.

    This should have gotten much cheaper now because of cheap PCs and storage.

  • +
    0 Votes
    Toni Bowers

    TechRepublic more than welcomes any ideas you would like to see covered in articles and blogs. You can post your ideas in the discussion area as you did with this question. But you can also private message and I will pass the ideas on to the appropriate parties within TR.

    +
    0 Votes
    DanLM

    Lol, how about the following suggestions.

    For a small business:
    Virtual Operating systems.
    I would like to see an article that possibly addressed the pro's and con's of using VM for a production server, and not as a test server. In my circumstance, I would have a backup crystal server on the MS while the primary OS would support some in house/lan developed applications which would utilize higher resources.
    1). There is both open source and vendor supported software. In what instance's would you consider using the open source over something that a vendor offered with paid support.
    2). Possibly address some high points on segregation of resources. Ie, hardware, access rights, shared ip, seperate ip's?
    3). Benefits that can be gained for a small business(yea, I know... cost) from utilizing VM over separate servers. The cons, or downfalls of utilizing a VM solution.

    RAID Units.
    1). I've been doing some reading(actually a lot) on raid. I pretty much know that there are different raid technology, and which is probably most appropriate for where I work. But, I would like to possibly see a review of the various Raid hardware units. Not necessarily by brand name, but why you would use one configuration over another. Ie, drive rack plugged into a raid card versus a raid unit with a separate OS controlling the raid.

    MySql.
    Since 5.0, MySql has become more mainstream with some of the functions that it offers. Ie. Stored procedures. Id like to see some articles on various coding tips. Different languages possibly shown... Personally, Id like to see Perl covered. But, I know that various people use VB with it. We use Java here at work with MySql. But, I think that a lot of coding techniques that are being used are not utilizing all the features that are beginning to appear with MySql that are more in line with it's big brothers like Oracle.

    Home servers
    Ok, I'm prejudice. I like Unix and BSD. But, some possible options here for the home user wanting to set up their own home server.
    IE.
    What to do when your home storage requirements outgrow individual drives. Software versus Hardware raid units. A cheep way to set them up.
    Securing your home server. I have my home server connected to the Internet so that I can access it from anywhere via SSH or FTP. I also run Apache from it. I can flat out tell you that the script kiddies pound the daylights out of it, I'm always tweaking my firewall settings. So, an article on how to only allow specific ports open at the router and why only those ports. Steps that can be taken at the server level to secure yourself.

    Open Source
    George covers a lot of the hot issues(security/release's) with regard to Microsoft. It would be nice to have say a regular article/blog on security issues that arise with regard to open source. Apache, PHP(I do not trust it), various UNIX/Linux Os's(BSD wifi issue discovered. Something that would allow the members have one place to go for major OpenSource os/applications to be informed of things like this.

    Chuckle, is that enough suggestions? Lol, I have more if you want.

    Dan

    +
    0 Votes
    georgeou

    1. We're going to be starting a whole section on Virtualization with Xen, Virtual Iron, Microsoft, and VMware.

    2. I'll do some more stuff on RAID and storage in general. Things like FC SAN, iSCSI, ATA over Ethernet.

    3. We'll find someone to do more stuff on MySQL.

    4. I and others will do some things on home servers. Since Microsoft doesn't even play in this market, it will be almost 100% Linux based solutions.

    5. We will be doing more Linux coverage with actual how-to guides. This next quarter, we will start with a section on implementing wireless security with Linux.


    If you have more suggestions, it is ALWAYS welcome :). These are great suggestions and we're here to serve people like you so please don't be shy about asking for things.

    +
    0 Votes
    DanLM

    Like I said, most of these suggestions were geared toward what I could use. I brought up MySql because I have watched the thread's here and know that others use it also. But, nowhere have I seen the new capabilities being utilized in the conversations.

    I personally think Microsoft is missing out on the home server market. I personally have over 800 gig right now, and I know others that have more. Just covering security on a home server would be beneficial. Having everything stored in one place opens itself up to huge disasters. Backup solutions would be nice in this area also.

    From TR's stand point(marketing money), I would go after MySql to see if you could advertise for them. They are a for profit organization that collects it's income through support. I would think that they would be interested in the exposure on a respectable IT forum other then what is said within the forums.

    And another suggestion, Oracle. As much as I think it's a resource hog and a pig to maintain, a boat load of businesses(small/large) use it. Guest writer from them would be nice once and awhile. Just the knowledge of the additioinal capabilities from release to release is worth it's weight in gold. Not counting the various tweaking or code tricks that they must have a store house of.

    Thanks again.

    Dan

    +
    0 Votes
    georgeou

    "I personally think Microsoft is missing out on the home server market. I personally have over 800 gig right now, and I know others that have more. Just covering security on a home server would be beneficial. Having everything stored in one place opens itself up to huge disasters. Backup solutions would be nice in this area also."

    Hey, you're not alone. I'm in the same boat as you. I'll definitely be covering this.

    "From TR's stand point(marketing money), I would go after MySql to see if you could advertise for them"

    Well I can't speak for TR marketing but I will say this. The happier TR users are the more of them stick around and the more of them join up. There is no commercial negative to that.

    "And another suggestion, Oracle. As much as I think it's a resource hog and a pig to maintain, a boat load of businesses(small/large) use it. Guest writer from them would be nice once and awhile. Just the knowledge of the additional capabilities from release to release is worth it's weight in gold. Not counting the various tweaking or code tricks that they must have a store house of."

    Hey it's not just you, IT IS A RESOURCE HOG! I was one of the first people in 2001 to deploy Oracle 11i and it was JRE based with a special Java initiator that had to be installed. It was suppose to be "client less" self service but the installer is so confusing the users were botching it half the time and the installer didn't clean out the old versions that was causing problems. I actually had to use WISE to wrap the installer in to a silent install and push it out via Active Directory. Then I had to set Active Directory Group Policy for IE to globally trust the 11i server. Furthermore, everyone had to be upgraded to a minimum of 256 or 512 MBs of RAM and the network backbone had to be upgraded to gigabit to accommodate passable load times in Oracle 11i. But even then it still took 30 seconds to load when it was already cached and I have Windows XP systems that boot faster than that. As for the DB engine for server and desktop deployment, it was always a nightmare because it shoved a ton of services and process startups in to Windows XP. Oh, and did I mention the strong arm threatening sales tactics they used on us to force us to renegotiate our contracts so that we'd pay them a ton of money. They would use words like "you're out of compliance" and threaten to audit us.

    OK sorry about the rant, I tend to get carried away when someone says the word Oracle. But you're right that it is a major player in IT and we really should have more Oracle content. I will bring it up with our content team. Thanks!

    +
    0 Votes

    Dan -

    I just put out on article on the eWay TK-63T appliance (http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10877_11-6143752.html) a few days ago, and I am working on an article on turning it into a SOHO networking appliance. You may want to keep an eye out for that. Depending on the feedback I get from it, I may do more articles using this unit. And I am going to be building a new *NIX (probably FreeBSD) server at home soon, and I may get an article or two out of that as well!

    A lot of my article idea actually come from feedback to my blog posts, so it is valuable to me to have folks comment on the blogs!

    Regarding MySQL, my experience has been that it does not really matter what language is talking to the DB too much, as long as the driver (ODBC, ADO, JDBC, etc.) isn't a mess.

    J.Ja

    +
    0 Votes
    DanLM

    Unfortunally, what I am seeing is specific to hardware brand names. Ie, HP or IBM. At least that's what I am reading now.

    I would prefer discussing VM from the stand point of generic host machine.

    If that makes any since. Oh well, read on dan... Read on.

    dan

    +
    0 Votes
    lifesablast

    I have been looking on and off for info on home security systems. But when I do search on "home security" I find lots of material on locking wireless networks, locking down servers, malware info, etc.

    But what I'm really interested in is what I need to install say 2 cameras that can record images of would-be thieves around my home. One camera needs to be set up in a building 1000 ft away and send remote images to a PC set up in my house (dedicated or not?). What hardware/software do I need? I don't want to buy a canned system. I'm sure I can build it myself but I just need a starting point with some info.

    Or is this subject not really content for TR?
    TIA for any info.

    +
    0 Votes
    georgeou

    There are cheap PCI cards with multiple analog video in or cheap IP cameras. I'm not sure what you'd use for software though.

    We've never done anything like this, but we might be able to do something that works for businesses and that in turn could be used for the home.

    This should have gotten much cheaper now because of cheap PCs and storage.