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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

By ebott ·
By default, Windows 2000 assigns a random machine name to each new PC on the network. Those awkward names make it difficult to access shared folders directly. Is it OK to change that name to match the name of the computer?s primary user? If not, what do you recommend using as a computer-naming strategy?

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by Ravi In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

The name should be meaningful, such as the user's name. In our organization (NT 4 as of now), we use the Office Location Name + the last 3 digits of the IP address to identify the machine (NYC191, for example). In the description column of the Server Applet in the control panel, we specify the full name of the user. Since the network spans the entire state, when the users browse the network neighborhood, they know where the machine is located and, if they enable View - Details, they can see the user name as well.

The IP suffix allows those of us in network administration to easily ping the machine and so forth. Of course, those with DHCP, won't be able to use this method.

In another organizatin that I was involved with, we usedto use WS (for workstation) + the mainframe user ID of the user as the machine name. Again, the server description had the full name of the user.

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by csheltcomp In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I would not give a computer the name of the present user. In the fast paced business world, the system will probably change hands on several occasions. I would try to go by building, dept and ser. #. ie...if you were in the main building in the executive dept.and the computers serial # is 12345, the name the computer....."MAIN-EXEC-12345"

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by steve.hutson In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

I originally started using user names for computer names and found it a *major pain* to be constantly changing computer names. Now, I use the Company's asset tag number (that goes on every new machine before distribution) and then change the User's Name in the Description field of the Server Manager. This field also allows room to include office number or location.

This approach gives me a computer name that never needs to be changed, and personalized information that is extremely valuable and easily modified when computers change hands.

Steve

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by isdept In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

All the other answers explain what you should do. Here is the answer to your question.

Yes. You can make the computer netbios names exactly the same as the username of the user. There are drawbacks but it can be done. No configuration needed.

Netbios takes care of it. It sees them as totally different types of names, catagories if you will.

Rename away my freind.

TJ

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ruturaj In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

We are a network integration company & many a time we start building the network from scratch some company's are spanned over a few floors in some building so the general convention we follow in naming PC's so that it is easy to document and draw a diagram is as follows.
1.) The first three characters is an acronym for the company name eg. Active Health Management would become AHM
2.) Then the department acronym eg AC
3.) Then the floor eg 06 or 14
4.) Then the pc number (relative to the total number of PC's in the organisation so that there can be a head count Workstations count & Server count seperated) eg 001 hence the full name would be AHM + AC + 06 + 001 = AHMAC06001 (This convention makes it easier in troubleshooting or locating PC's centrally). But I believe just naming is not enough, you have to have good documentation preceding the naming & Definately I would not use the default Windows 2000 name assignments & I also agree with the fact to never name a PC after the person using it(what i

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Ed Bott's Microsoft Challenge 1/27

by ebott In reply to Ed Bott's Microsoft Chall ...

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