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Engineering "Leaders" to Convene to Undermine Future of U.S. Engineering

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Engineering "Leaders" to Convene to Undermine Future of U.S. Engineering

Professor8
rbengrguy wrote: "Just looked for the latest issue of TODAY'S ENGINEER"
http://www.todaysengineer.org/2012/May/NEF.asp

TE wrote: "The Forum is being convened by several notable "leaders" of the engineering community including NAE President Charles Vest and former Lockheed Martin"

jgo wrote: "major marketers of the revenue enhancing and privacy violating "red-light camera" systems... now isn't that "innovative"!?"

TE wrote: CEO Norman Augustine as a way of initiating a national discussion on...

Whose vision is right and whose is wrong?...

The core questions
* does America face an emerging crisis of engineering capacity and what should be done (both in the areas of K-12 STEM education and higher education) to help strengthen that overall capacity and prepare the "renaissance" engineers sought by industry employers. Member input is welcome and can be posted here as Reader Feedback or by email to _president@_"

president @ ieeeusa . org

jgo wrote: "You've certainly stacked the house. Where are the seats at the table for Norm Matloff, Ron Hira, Kim Berry, Rob Sanchez, John Miano, B. Lindsay Lowell, Hal Salzman, David North, Edwin S. Rubenstein, Mark Krikorian, Gene Nelson, Sona Shah, Darin and/or Jennifer Wedel, Pat Fluno, Michael Emmons, David Huber and others not out to stab US citizen STEM workers -- and especially the 1.8 million unemployed and under-employed US STEM workers -- in the back?"

JB wrote: "Blaming k-12 for not motivating our youth to pursue STEM. No blame where it belongs, bad immigration policy that makes software engineering and the like bad career choices. Supply will follow demand in areas which have career longevity and pay well."


DS wrote: "From what I see my 2nd grad kid learning there is no problem with schools. its all a lie. Also, I think its kinda funny how we have all these robotics clubs everywhere; when most of the robotics jobs are going to be far far away. DS

Well, they knew, back in the 1980s, when the off-shoring of
manufacturing ramped up, that the argument that those old
"dirty, dangerous" jobs were never going to be totally
replaced by jobs programming robots and machine tools,
and that sending even those whose talents were most in
line with that to training courses wasn't going to keep them
employed at the level and doing work that was as fulfilling
as they had been doing.

And, of course, they were shipping the tech for making robots
and machine tools and chip fabrication as rapidly as they could
to Japan and Red China, so that even partial re-employment
possibility was being undermined while it was being used as
a cover story to assuage the objects to the off-shoring of
manufacturing.

But I'm still wondering how many of "us" wrote to that IEEE
address to object to the phony, stacked "forum".
Has this been cross-posted on allthingsd or that site that
Walter watches? I'll have to double check the other yahoo
discussions.