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How does a web page consume resources?

By Healer ·
Does any activity of a web page scrolled out of sight still go on in the background consuming resources? Sometimes I see a banner or some flash commercials or videos and so on, I quickly scroll the area in question out of sight hoping it would stop consuming resources such as memory and CPU. I would even change the size of the browser so that the activity is not visible. Does it help?

I can hear music or talking if there is sound. I suppose any visual stuff should stop because no area in the screen is dedicated to it.

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Reponse To Answer

by Slayer_ In reply to Hi Deadly Earnest,

If your really paranoid you can use the browser is use, Avant. Avant Ultimate in Firefox mode supports my favorite addins. And Avant natively lets you block flash, videos, pictures, scripts, activeX. It prevents them from downloading.

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What if a web page is reloaded?

by Healer In reply to How does a web page consu ...

If a web page has not been changed and is reloaded for whatever reason while the page is still open in the Internet browser, will the page be wholly retrieved from the source web server?

What if the browser has been closed and re-opened?

If the web page will not be wholly retrieved from the source web server in the above scenarios, what if only a bit of data change has occurred on the page? Will the whole web page be downloaded again or just the bit of data changed or updated on the page be downloaded again?

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Reponse To Answer

by OH Smeg In reply to What if a web page is rel ...

If you reload the page it reloads and downloads the entire page again.

If you shut the browser and then reopen it and then reopen the page without going to any other web site you may recover the existing page from Cache but will most likely reload the page from scratch again.

The reason for this is that most times when you reopen the browser it goes to a different Web Site and loads that first overwriting the Cache of the one you wanted to keep.

Col

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According to the settings of Internet Explorer...

by Healer In reply to How does a web page consu ...

Thanks Col again.

Don't they always reload first from the cache within the local computer if the pages have recently been visited, then the local server if there is one before resorting to the source web server. I don't know how long the pages are kept in the cache, though.

If local cache is not used for efficiency, why would there be temporary Internet files. With Internet Explorer there are settings for temporary Internet files. It says Internet Explorer stores copies of webpages, images, and media for faster viewing later. One can set the Internet Explorer to check for newer versions of stored pages either every time the webpage is visited or every time the Internet Explorer is started. I am not too sure how "Automatically" works. I expect it would just do what I have supposed.

I use Firefox most of the time, I am not too sure where the settings like those of Internet Explorer are. I believe Firefox would be capable of doing the same in order to survive.

From choice of settings for the Internet Explorer, it seems to me that chances are the Internet Explorer would always fetch the pages locally from the cache. I suppose the competitors like Firefox would do the same.

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Reponse To Answer

by OH Smeg In reply to According to the settings ...

The Temporary Internet Files are mostly Stored Cookies and the like not complete Web Pages though IE does Cache all of it's pages though I'm personally not sure just how effective this is.

As an experiment log into TR with IE and refresh the page. Time the time taken to complete the refresh. Then clear the Temp Internet Files and refresh the page again.

It takes the same time to reload the page but now you are not logged in to TR as the cookie which has your Log In Details has been deleted. In IE on Win 7 you get to the Temp Internet Files by left clicking on the Gear Wheel on the top right hand side of the screen beside the Favorites then clicking on Internet Options and when the next window opens click on the Settings Tab and wait for the next Window to Open then click on the View Files Tab. The Temp Internet Files Window will now open though if you have not changed the default settings to Show Hidden Files you may have some difficulty in viewing the files.

Probably the easiest way to view what is happening is to Open the Task Manager click on the Networking Tab and monitor the Actual Network Traffic. You can change the color of the traces from Green for All to Yellow for Incoming and Red for outgoing traffic so you have some idea of what is being sent and received.

Col

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That temp cache works like this

by Slayer_ In reply to How does a web page consu ...

IE, and all browsers, download the contents of a webpage, all images, videos, everything to your hard drive, and then display them from there.
When you reload a page (not using refresh, but by navigating to it normally) the browser checks the version of the file on the server. Depending on the result, it downloads or reloads the old files. I think it bases it on date and time.
Sometimes, the cache files get overwritten, if on the same site, you download two different index.htm files, the first one is replaced. IE does separate these by website.

When you start reaching the defined maximum cache size, the oldest files are deleted to make room for new ones.

So as you click through TR, the images, and other common elements are saved and reused.


I hope that answers how the cache works.


You can try browsing only by your cache by setting your browser to offline mode. I don't know how to do that in firefox, in IE its under that gear, then the file menu (or it was last time I used IE)

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Thanks Col!

by Healer In reply to How does a web page consu ...

I do see quite a lot of web pages in there. I hardly use Internet Explorer as I use Firefox so I can't see much. I shall use a bit more and monitor the Temporary Internet Files. I wonder how long they keep the files though.

I do not know how to change the colour of the traces at the Networking tab of the task manager. I shall do some research and find out. A quick search at Google has not turned up anything useful.

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Reponse To Answer

by OH Smeg In reply to Thanks Col!

OK to change the Trace Colors Open the Task Manager and click on the Network Tab.

Then Click on View and from the drop down list highlight Network Adapter History, you can change the colors there though you'll have to do it one step at a time as that is how it works.

As for how long the Cache is kept I seem to remember it's not so much a Time Limit as a Size Limit. Once the Cache reaches it's predetermined size the oldest files get replaced with the newest.

Col

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Thanks Slayer_

by Healer In reply to How does a web page consu ...

I shall from now onwards temporarily use Internet Explorer to explore what you say.

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Reponse To Answer

by Slayer_ In reply to Thanks Slayer_

I'm pretty sure all the browsers do this.
Probably need to google where offline mode is in firefox.

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