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Learning VB

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Learning VB

papa_adam06
Hello,

I am self-learning VB now. My source is solely from internet. After 2 months I found it very difficult for me to grab the knowledge. The more I learn/read the more I get confused. It seem like there is so much more beside the coding and to make it worst (for me), different peoples use different methods (code, etc). What is the best way to master programming (to the extent can develop simple workable software). What are the other knowledges essential before ones can study programming? Any different between robotic programming and programming for windows apps
  • +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    hefty one in the environment.
    At the moment you will be trying to pick up VB, the IDE, OO and the event driven model and probably with examples that don't mean that much to you.

    A possible way to ease you in why not try simulating a simple robot arm. Start off with just the numbers with some intital values and increments.

    Move on to buttons and sliders, displaying limits. May be then a bit of graphics or a bit of object orientation. Tool tips like diplaying and angle or extension when the
    mouse hovers over the representation.
    Get parameters values off a database, do a web based simulation.

    Probably a good idea to invest in a book on programming in VB. The big problem with the web for learning is you have to be pretty sure of the question you want to ask.

    It's the instruction set and the extraordinarily large range of motions that's doing you in.

    I bet your first robot was very simple, didn't talk, make your tea, maintain starships or win wars etc.
    There were lot's of things you didn't have to know to build and control it, just the same in windows. Consider it black box for now, or an unrequired component. Put the wheels on later as it were.

    +
    0 Votes
    SF_Pat

    Many States offer a free education at the community college if you are layed off from a job. You may want to check with your local community college to see if they offer any classes that can give you a good grounding in programming. Also check the college library they may have some good programming books? You will not get to check them out until you enroll, but there is no charge for reading in the library.

    If you are doing this to find employment in the programming field, I would start easy learn VBscript or VBA they are not pretty but they can be learned quickly and you can then find a job and start paying the bills. Most community colleges have a placement service and counseling that can offer you part-time work. See what types of programming skills are in demand in your locally. I have observed the internet is better for honing skills than teaching skills.

    People who take classes learn the material many times faster than learning on their own as the professor will filter the material and teach just the most essential information. The night-time professors frequently moon-light in teaching and work in the profession during the day. My best programming classes are generally taught by the evening instructors. Watching the thought process the teacher uses in solving problems can be very helpful in reducing your own coding and debuging time.

    Good hunting and good Luck!

    +
    0 Votes
    Dr Dij

    the IEEE
    computer.org

    and the ACM
    acm.org

    both have dozens of VB, VB.net, visual studio courses

    membership which includes courses online for year is about $100/yr

    +
    0 Votes
    toms45

    for the nice compliment about evening teachers at community colleges. I've been an adjunct (that's the official name for us part timers) since 1994 and have enjoyed every minute of it. You're quite correct about the "filtering" process and since we're activily employed as developers we have a better idea of relevance than do the full time staff.
    I've found that most who attempt to learn on their own, invariably don't learn enough to understand the "why" of the "what".
    Thanks again

    +
    0 Votes
    Locrian_Lyric

    Use the "Record new macro" feature as often as you like.

    What this will do is give you a representation in VBA code of what you are doing on the screen. from there, you can play with it a bit.

    +
    0 Votes
    michel.vallee

    Starting with macro record in Excel is not the best idea because what you obtain is the interaction between VBA (Visual Basic for Application) and the OO (object Oriented) Interface of Excel. You can do the same with Word but it does not learn you the basics of VB language.
    A better idea is to start with VBScript, which exist on all Windows PC's or is available for free at Microsoft Web Site.
    VBScript is slightly different from true VB but the differences are explained in the VBScript documentation.
    Using cscript.exe, you can learn how to control the flow of execution in a program.
    To find VBScript documentation on your PC, search file VBS*.CHM
    The asterisc * is find any version, currently we version 5.6 with XP or Vista but you can find version 5.5 on your PC

    +
    0 Votes
    jerry~Beans&Bytes

    now, i'm an accountant, not a programmmer, but ...
    i used Excel until it couldn't do what i needed it to do. by then, (from watching my macros), i had learned enough that i was able to code in FoxPro (which will tell you how old i am). again, i hit a wall, and again, i was able to take the next step (VB and, since i am a database guy, SQL).

    this is a slow way of getting there, but it is pretty natural, easy way of growing into programming. whenver you get impatient, go to school to ramp up your learning curve.

    +
    0 Votes
    D_Bones

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/

    The above link takes you to a free download for various components of the free to use Visual studio. Including Visual Basic.
    Lots of help and examples on how to use the programs. Large download though. Read the installation notes before downloading. Best of luck

    +
    0 Votes
    SpatsTriptiphan

    Microsoft Studio Express has great resources to learn VB6 while learning ASP.NET 2.0 which is going to make you much more attractive to companies.

    +
    0 Votes
    rob

    What you are asking may be akin to someone holding a set of spanners and asking what is the best way to use them?
    Are you building a bycicle? assembling some furniture? installing a bathroom?

    VB is a tool, and not an end in itself, so fist of all you have to have a goal in mind, then work out how to get VB to help you achieve that goal.

    Do you want to work with databases?
    Do you want to produce games or graphics intensive applications?
    Do you want to automate?

    Then you really need to get hold of a good book on the subject - IDG 'Bible' series are good as reference works with examples included - the 'net is largely a resource to ask problem solving questions, unless you can find on-line courses - even then, you really need to have an idea of what you want to do.

    +
    0 Votes
    mdv3441

    Besides the examples provided by Microsoft you might look at http://www.planetsourcecode.com/
    It has many source code examples of just about any VB or VB.net applications and many include comment/documentation in the programs.

    Mike

    +
    0 Votes
    mikifinaz1

    Start with making good scripts. I started by using Tim Hill's NT shell scripting and others.

    Once I had gotten my feet under me with scripts I moved to a book (I can't remember the title etc.) by a programmer called something like beyond programming, coding or something close where she discussed the structures of programming like loops and showed how to look beyond the details.

    Every language I have seen uses a loop once you can identify the "tools" like a loop you can find them in any language and use them.

    I moved from scripts, to HTML, then VB and finally C. As I cover more languages the similarities become apparent and make it easier to learn another language. Now I am working with Perl, PHP, Ruby, XML and others as the need arises.

    I found this a slow process in the beginning but as I have learned more it has become faster and easier to learn programming and languages. I am don't have the flair. There are some programmers that have an essence that makes the Uber programmers but you don't have to have it to be a good programmer.

    +
    0 Votes
    brettellingson

    This question is near to things I've been experiencing recently in my life. Thankfully I'm currently employed but I've been doing lots and lots of thinking about what I want to ?do with my life.?

    SHORT ANSWER
    -www.learnvisualstudio.net - cost money but really good
    -www.wikipedia.org (or .com) - good outlines of different topics
    -"________" For Dummies (Fill in the blank like C++ for Dummies, VB for dummies, etc)
    -Find a job in some technology department and work your way into a programming position from the inside of a company

    LONG ANSWER:
    What other suggestions have you had or what have you tried? How long have you been interested in programming? Is your interest a passing interest or have you wanted to do this for a while? You mentioned unemployment - not to get too personal but what is your financial situation? Are you desperate for a job? If so, that'd be the first priority to get something going to pay the bills, then you can work on improving your skills part time in the evening

    One idea on the job search is to put in your resume with recruiters at different staffing agencies. (Do you have staffing agencies in the Netherlands?) there are tons and tons of them out there in America. Are you a quick learner? If so one idea is to go to one (or multiple staffing agencies) and say that you're willing to take any job that is related to technology. What that can do is to get your foot in the door somewhere and get food on the table.

    Try to use any technology that you can to do your job in a different way. For example, the job I'm at now has a lot of reporting that is done, but instead of just using access and excel, I'm trying to find a way to use crystal reports or some other reporting tool. I still do my job, but I'm also building my resume at the same time.

    Whether or not books and the internet will work is also something personal for you. I've found that I'm a good learner through on-line stuff, I'm very self-motivated and I enjoy reading and researching topics so the internet and books are great for me. But some people do better if they have a structured class environment to get them started. which one are you or which side do you lean more toward?

    One good in between idea, in between a book and a traditional classroom is to take on-line classes. There are tons and tons of classes on line that you can take. And actually the University of Illinois - Springfield, has an online B.S. degree program that you can pursue or an on-line masters program - you can do these programs completely from your home. Illinois has hundreds of totally online classes - some only $80 (plus books and such) for the whole semester - http://www.ivc.illinois.edu/ - actually

    www.learnvisualstudio.net - is a website that you can subscribe to and it has like 500 downloadable videos. Bob Tabor is the guy who runs the site and he is/was a microsoft C# MVP, but he also has some great stuff for VB and ASP and other stuff.

    Also, I thought it was a great suggestion to find out what it is that you want to produce and that a programming language is a tool. Figure out what it is you want to build then you can find the best tool available to build it with. So you could build a webpage with really cool stuff using like Microsoft Visual studio. Then you could use the webpage as a resume (I think you can use MS Visual Studio to do this?)

    For the internet, I think that's pretty insightful that you generally have to know what you're looking for to be able to use it well. I personally love wikipedia and the summaries that they give on different subject and the links that they provide. Also if you do a search for e-books or ebooks on google, you can find a couple of places to buy some of these books as a pdf file, then you can read them and search them from your computer.

    I'm a big fan of the dummies books series and they have them for the C++ or C# or VB and many other programming languages. Also, if you look at almost any book that discusses VBA with MS Access or MS excel - the first few chapters will have a decent discussion of programming concepts

    Does this help? I know I rambled on about a lot of different stuff. But hopefully that gives you a start??.seems like one of the best ideas after all of this is what someone else already said in the post and that?s to figure out what you want to build and then try to us a programming language to do it.

    Brett

    +
    0 Votes
    nih_nay

    Hello,
    If you wish we may interact on mails, and I can guide you. I have also learnt the hard way but today i am programming for last 8 years

    Mody

    +
    0 Votes
    jprogrammer9

    I dont know whether this method works for you or not!! But give it a go.. for one month.

    You get lot of ebooks from internet for eg:WWW.esnips.com search for VB ebooks.
    Then follow one good book which has lot of examples...start doing a project which you are holding for long time to do and implement it..whilst reading book.
    You can Master it!!!! ok
    Good Luck

  • +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    hefty one in the environment.
    At the moment you will be trying to pick up VB, the IDE, OO and the event driven model and probably with examples that don't mean that much to you.

    A possible way to ease you in why not try simulating a simple robot arm. Start off with just the numbers with some intital values and increments.

    Move on to buttons and sliders, displaying limits. May be then a bit of graphics or a bit of object orientation. Tool tips like diplaying and angle or extension when the
    mouse hovers over the representation.
    Get parameters values off a database, do a web based simulation.

    Probably a good idea to invest in a book on programming in VB. The big problem with the web for learning is you have to be pretty sure of the question you want to ask.

    It's the instruction set and the extraordinarily large range of motions that's doing you in.

    I bet your first robot was very simple, didn't talk, make your tea, maintain starships or win wars etc.
    There were lot's of things you didn't have to know to build and control it, just the same in windows. Consider it black box for now, or an unrequired component. Put the wheels on later as it were.

    +
    0 Votes
    SF_Pat

    Many States offer a free education at the community college if you are layed off from a job. You may want to check with your local community college to see if they offer any classes that can give you a good grounding in programming. Also check the college library they may have some good programming books? You will not get to check them out until you enroll, but there is no charge for reading in the library.

    If you are doing this to find employment in the programming field, I would start easy learn VBscript or VBA they are not pretty but they can be learned quickly and you can then find a job and start paying the bills. Most community colleges have a placement service and counseling that can offer you part-time work. See what types of programming skills are in demand in your locally. I have observed the internet is better for honing skills than teaching skills.

    People who take classes learn the material many times faster than learning on their own as the professor will filter the material and teach just the most essential information. The night-time professors frequently moon-light in teaching and work in the profession during the day. My best programming classes are generally taught by the evening instructors. Watching the thought process the teacher uses in solving problems can be very helpful in reducing your own coding and debuging time.

    Good hunting and good Luck!

    +
    0 Votes
    Dr Dij

    the IEEE
    computer.org

    and the ACM
    acm.org

    both have dozens of VB, VB.net, visual studio courses

    membership which includes courses online for year is about $100/yr

    +
    0 Votes
    toms45

    for the nice compliment about evening teachers at community colleges. I've been an adjunct (that's the official name for us part timers) since 1994 and have enjoyed every minute of it. You're quite correct about the "filtering" process and since we're activily employed as developers we have a better idea of relevance than do the full time staff.
    I've found that most who attempt to learn on their own, invariably don't learn enough to understand the "why" of the "what".
    Thanks again

    +
    0 Votes
    Locrian_Lyric

    Use the "Record new macro" feature as often as you like.

    What this will do is give you a representation in VBA code of what you are doing on the screen. from there, you can play with it a bit.

    +
    0 Votes
    michel.vallee

    Starting with macro record in Excel is not the best idea because what you obtain is the interaction between VBA (Visual Basic for Application) and the OO (object Oriented) Interface of Excel. You can do the same with Word but it does not learn you the basics of VB language.
    A better idea is to start with VBScript, which exist on all Windows PC's or is available for free at Microsoft Web Site.
    VBScript is slightly different from true VB but the differences are explained in the VBScript documentation.
    Using cscript.exe, you can learn how to control the flow of execution in a program.
    To find VBScript documentation on your PC, search file VBS*.CHM
    The asterisc * is find any version, currently we version 5.6 with XP or Vista but you can find version 5.5 on your PC

    +
    0 Votes
    jerry~Beans&Bytes

    now, i'm an accountant, not a programmmer, but ...
    i used Excel until it couldn't do what i needed it to do. by then, (from watching my macros), i had learned enough that i was able to code in FoxPro (which will tell you how old i am). again, i hit a wall, and again, i was able to take the next step (VB and, since i am a database guy, SQL).

    this is a slow way of getting there, but it is pretty natural, easy way of growing into programming. whenver you get impatient, go to school to ramp up your learning curve.

    +
    0 Votes
    D_Bones

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/

    The above link takes you to a free download for various components of the free to use Visual studio. Including Visual Basic.
    Lots of help and examples on how to use the programs. Large download though. Read the installation notes before downloading. Best of luck

    +
    0 Votes
    SpatsTriptiphan

    Microsoft Studio Express has great resources to learn VB6 while learning ASP.NET 2.0 which is going to make you much more attractive to companies.

    +
    0 Votes
    rob

    What you are asking may be akin to someone holding a set of spanners and asking what is the best way to use them?
    Are you building a bycicle? assembling some furniture? installing a bathroom?

    VB is a tool, and not an end in itself, so fist of all you have to have a goal in mind, then work out how to get VB to help you achieve that goal.

    Do you want to work with databases?
    Do you want to produce games or graphics intensive applications?
    Do you want to automate?

    Then you really need to get hold of a good book on the subject - IDG 'Bible' series are good as reference works with examples included - the 'net is largely a resource to ask problem solving questions, unless you can find on-line courses - even then, you really need to have an idea of what you want to do.

    +
    0 Votes
    mdv3441

    Besides the examples provided by Microsoft you might look at http://www.planetsourcecode.com/
    It has many source code examples of just about any VB or VB.net applications and many include comment/documentation in the programs.

    Mike

    +
    0 Votes
    mikifinaz1

    Start with making good scripts. I started by using Tim Hill's NT shell scripting and others.

    Once I had gotten my feet under me with scripts I moved to a book (I can't remember the title etc.) by a programmer called something like beyond programming, coding or something close where she discussed the structures of programming like loops and showed how to look beyond the details.

    Every language I have seen uses a loop once you can identify the "tools" like a loop you can find them in any language and use them.

    I moved from scripts, to HTML, then VB and finally C. As I cover more languages the similarities become apparent and make it easier to learn another language. Now I am working with Perl, PHP, Ruby, XML and others as the need arises.

    I found this a slow process in the beginning but as I have learned more it has become faster and easier to learn programming and languages. I am don't have the flair. There are some programmers that have an essence that makes the Uber programmers but you don't have to have it to be a good programmer.

    +
    0 Votes
    brettellingson

    This question is near to things I've been experiencing recently in my life. Thankfully I'm currently employed but I've been doing lots and lots of thinking about what I want to ?do with my life.?

    SHORT ANSWER
    -www.learnvisualstudio.net - cost money but really good
    -www.wikipedia.org (or .com) - good outlines of different topics
    -"________" For Dummies (Fill in the blank like C++ for Dummies, VB for dummies, etc)
    -Find a job in some technology department and work your way into a programming position from the inside of a company

    LONG ANSWER:
    What other suggestions have you had or what have you tried? How long have you been interested in programming? Is your interest a passing interest or have you wanted to do this for a while? You mentioned unemployment - not to get too personal but what is your financial situation? Are you desperate for a job? If so, that'd be the first priority to get something going to pay the bills, then you can work on improving your skills part time in the evening

    One idea on the job search is to put in your resume with recruiters at different staffing agencies. (Do you have staffing agencies in the Netherlands?) there are tons and tons of them out there in America. Are you a quick learner? If so one idea is to go to one (or multiple staffing agencies) and say that you're willing to take any job that is related to technology. What that can do is to get your foot in the door somewhere and get food on the table.

    Try to use any technology that you can to do your job in a different way. For example, the job I'm at now has a lot of reporting that is done, but instead of just using access and excel, I'm trying to find a way to use crystal reports or some other reporting tool. I still do my job, but I'm also building my resume at the same time.

    Whether or not books and the internet will work is also something personal for you. I've found that I'm a good learner through on-line stuff, I'm very self-motivated and I enjoy reading and researching topics so the internet and books are great for me. But some people do better if they have a structured class environment to get them started. which one are you or which side do you lean more toward?

    One good in between idea, in between a book and a traditional classroom is to take on-line classes. There are tons and tons of classes on line that you can take. And actually the University of Illinois - Springfield, has an online B.S. degree program that you can pursue or an on-line masters program - you can do these programs completely from your home. Illinois has hundreds of totally online classes - some only $80 (plus books and such) for the whole semester - http://www.ivc.illinois.edu/ - actually

    www.learnvisualstudio.net - is a website that you can subscribe to and it has like 500 downloadable videos. Bob Tabor is the guy who runs the site and he is/was a microsoft C# MVP, but he also has some great stuff for VB and ASP and other stuff.

    Also, I thought it was a great suggestion to find out what it is that you want to produce and that a programming language is a tool. Figure out what it is you want to build then you can find the best tool available to build it with. So you could build a webpage with really cool stuff using like Microsoft Visual studio. Then you could use the webpage as a resume (I think you can use MS Visual Studio to do this?)

    For the internet, I think that's pretty insightful that you generally have to know what you're looking for to be able to use it well. I personally love wikipedia and the summaries that they give on different subject and the links that they provide. Also if you do a search for e-books or ebooks on google, you can find a couple of places to buy some of these books as a pdf file, then you can read them and search them from your computer.

    I'm a big fan of the dummies books series and they have them for the C++ or C# or VB and many other programming languages. Also, if you look at almost any book that discusses VBA with MS Access or MS excel - the first few chapters will have a decent discussion of programming concepts

    Does this help? I know I rambled on about a lot of different stuff. But hopefully that gives you a start??.seems like one of the best ideas after all of this is what someone else already said in the post and that?s to figure out what you want to build and then try to us a programming language to do it.

    Brett

    +
    0 Votes
    nih_nay

    Hello,
    If you wish we may interact on mails, and I can guide you. I have also learnt the hard way but today i am programming for last 8 years

    Mody

    +
    0 Votes
    jprogrammer9

    I dont know whether this method works for you or not!! But give it a go.. for one month.

    You get lot of ebooks from internet for eg:WWW.esnips.com search for VB ebooks.
    Then follow one good book which has lot of examples...start doing a project which you are holding for long time to do and implement it..whilst reading book.
    You can Master it!!!! ok
    Good Luck