General discussion

Locked

Memory

By groer ·
I downloaded a techrepublic recommended program called MemTest.exe. It said that if my PC could run the program all night my memory was OK ("the proper way to test is overnight - if the machine makes no errors in that period of time then there is nostatistical reason to expect any errors over a longer run.
".
Well, my PC hit an error within one minute. How good is this program? Is there good RAM and not so good RAM? Is my RAM really no good?

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

11 total posts (Page 1 of 2)   01 | 02   Next
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Memory

by dmiles In reply to Memory

This may be a opinion of the Program and the type of memory that you may be using.
Evaluating a program would have to be based on the hardware and software that is loaded on the machine at time of evaluation.
Comparing the test results would greatly depend on the type of memory being used and the results based on how the performance of the memory being used would be different from one type or the other.
Why not open a discussion on this topic and provide info on the Program and the type of system the test was performed on.
The results would vary from one machine to the other and it would not necessarilly conclude that you have not so good memory,and then to there is good memory and bad memory that get through QC.

Collapse -

Memory

by groer In reply to Memory

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Memory

by B_Pope In reply to Memory

as soulrider pointed out it's the opinion of that program.
perhaps that program was written by one of the chip makers,I wonder who's memory would pass in such a case.
if you have Norton system works try their memory tester,but keep in mind their'sfails on sytems with more than 512megs.
so you would have to test your dimms one at a time ,if your over 512megs.
I wouldn't trust one test source.
you don't know the motivation of the author of such programs.

Collapse -

Memory

by B_Pope In reply to Memory

also don't know why you need to test your memory all night.
does memory ownly cause errors at 3:00am or is 3:45am.
sounds a little funny doesn't it.

Collapse -

Memory

by groer In reply to Memory

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Memory

by maxwell edison In reply to Memory

Greetings,

The following article titled, ?Dealing with Bad Memory (RAM)?:

http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/article07-005

Says the following:

Bad memory can manifest itself in anything from frequent error messages to your system simplynot starting. Errors in your RAM aren't always steady or reliable, either - they can be intermittent, occurring at completely random intervals. The first thing you should do is pull out each SIMM, and make sure there isn't any dust or other obstruction between the pins and your motherboard (don't use a wet rag to clean this, however). Make sure all your SIMMs (or DIMMs) are seated properly; they should snap into place, and should be level and firm (don't break them testing their firmness, however). If all that is in order, there are two ways to determine if your RAM is actually faulty.

The first way is to use a software-testing program (CheckIt and Windsor Technologies' PC Diagnostics, both commercial packages, are the only programs weknow of that do this) to run a continual test of your RAM (have it repeat the test many times, perhaps overnight).

The second way is to go to your local computer store any buy more RAM. Replace your SIMMs one-by-one until the problem subsides - if this doesn't work, there's nothing wrong with your memory. If you find a bad SIMM, toss it.

(CheckIt, by the way, costs about $50.00)

Ram Stress Test:

http://freepctech.com/articles/articles.php?ArticleId=29

FREEware memory test (and article):

http://www.netrino.com/Articles/MemoryTesting/

Good luck,

Maxwell

Collapse -

Memory

by maxwell edison In reply to Memory

.
.
This may be the same one that you downloaded from TechRepublei, at least the name is the same (or similar). But there's an extensive article that goes along with it.

http://www.webtxt.com/articles/150801/2.htm

As far as knowing for sure whether or not the TechRepublic utility works or not, I don't think there's any way to know for sure. If I ran the program and it detected a RAM problem, I would be skeptical - especially if I had no prior "error" indication that there was a RAM problem.

So, color me skeptical.

Best of luck,

Maxwell

Collapse -

Memory

by groer In reply to Memory

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

Memory

by s_pryce In reply to Memory

further to the other answers;
You can't actually fully test RAM in situ for a couple of reasons. One, not all the ram can be tested as the machine doing the checking is actually running the program and the OS won't allow access to all memory. Two, to fully test RAM requires an addressing test, you write one bit and check all the rest to see if an error occurs elsewhere. A PC is constantly accessing RAM to run. Three, The use of various caches on the machine makes it impossible to know whether you are actually writing to physical memory. Four, when you get a false result, you don't actually know whether the memory of something else is responsible. Five, all memory is actually gaurenteed to work all the time (1x10 to the 12 R/W will fail).A SIMM/DIMM tester can do better, but fully address testing 1GB takes longer than the RAM will last (takes years) and anyway its not valid test as it doesn't check the ability of the RAM to work in your system.
All in all its not easy subject, but most RAM failures are obvious, the machine has a problem, why try to solve a problem you don't have. Intermittant failures are often caused by incompatibilty with the machine, move it somewhere else and it may go away.
To answer your question, unless you have a problem you know about, your RAM's good enough.
Said my piece so I'll shut up again.

Collapse -

Memory

by groer In reply to Memory

Poster rated this answer

Back to Desktop Forum
11 total posts (Page 1 of 2)   01 | 02   Next

Related Discussions

Related Forums