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New OS With New Motherboard?

By mraftice ·
Am I correct that if you replace the motherboard on a machine that has a legally licensed copy of Windows XP that you have to buy another license because Microsoft considers it a "New Machine?"

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Just did it - no problem

by djeske2 In reply to New OS With New Motherboa ...

I just had the motherboard on my Dell Inspiron 5160 replaced (overheating problem). Win/XP Pro SP2 restarted without any clue that anything had been done (i.e. did not even ask for re-activation), as expected, since CPU, Disk, etc. had not changed.

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This will help

by nentech In reply to New OS With New Motherboa ...

This is a link a document about Activation
http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/1/6/21654b16-6c81-4d96-9390-5203cd43d07d/WPA_SP1_Market_Bulletin.doc

This one is Q&A about software licences

http://download.microsoft.com/download/4/e/3/4e3eace0-4c6d-4123-9d0c-c80436181742/OSLicQA.doc

Hope this helps you

Edited to remove all but the links

Duh I should read them
I was tired

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It depends on how Windows XP was licensed.

by pjboyles In reply to New OS With New Motherboa ...

If the system is an OEM (ie Dell, HP, etc) and you replaced it with a different motherboard, you will need to purchase a copy of Windows. These are licensed to the hardware and you must replace broken motherboards with a replacement of the same board.

If this was a box copy you installed (full, oem, upgrade) and you replaced your motherboard on the system, you should be able to reactivate Windows XP from Microsoft. I usually do so over the Internet. Sometimes I had to call.

Full copies can be moved to new machines.

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I think this clarifies the OEM issue

by paulankin In reply to It depends on how Windows ...

Statement from Microsoft Education Operating System Licensing Q&A

http://download.microsoft.com/download/4/e/3/4e3eace0-4c6d-4123-9d0c-c80436181742/OSLicQA.doc

Q. Rather than purchase completely new PCs, my organization performs in-place upgrades to the hardware on many of our computers. We often times only replace the motherboard, processor, and memory. Since the COA is still on the case and the OS is still installed on the hard drive, this computer is still licensed, right?

ANSWER. Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your computer and maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard. An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer." Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from one computer to another. Therefore, if the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect then a new computer has been created, the original license expires, and a new full operating system license (not upgrade) is required. This is true even if the computer is covered under Software Assurance or other Volume License programs

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You do NOT need to buy another license....

by Desktop Veteran In reply to New OS With New Motherboa ...

The license of the operating system refers to the installion of the OS on the HD. Replacing hardware does not constitute an additional installation. Even if the HD had crashed and you had reinstall the OS from scratch, that still only counts as one installation of the operating system, and that is what you paid for. Once you install the OS on two different systems, then you have technically violated the license agreement.

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However......

by Desktop Veteran In reply to You do NOT need to buy an ...

I should mention that Microsoft does not always follow a logical path (as if they ever have). And based on that thought, there may be a difference between OEM and PRO, and whether or not your working with a site license. I tend to forget about the licensing issues because I always work with site or volume licensing. The issue would be with the "activation" of the OS. I wouldn't think you'd have to activate the OS by simply switching the motherboard, but leave it to MS to find a way to charge you twice for the same product.

There ought to be a law against it! ;-0

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bios replacement makes you buy a new license

by rtroy56 In reply to You do NOT need to buy an ...

So why, if you upgrade the bios on an oem based xp installation (as on a HP box), do you have to then buy a new copy of XP?

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You don't need to!

by RobPatten In reply to bios replacement makes yo ...

If the BIOS is significantly different from the older version, Windows XP may think that the motherboard has been changed and consider the change significant enough for re-activation to be required.

Just because you are prompted to re-activate does not mean that your license is no longer valid. You should be able to successfully re-activate your copy of Windows XP, and if it won't do it automatically you can call the toll free number provided to you on the activation wizard where you will be asked some standard questions and you will be given an activation code.

It amazes me the number of people who have perfectly legitimate software who seem to be scared to use the 'call the activation centre' option and assume they are doomed!

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So true

by nentech In reply to You don't need to!

Why don?t they just ask Microsoft?

What is Microsoft going to do?

Say yes or no

It?s that simple

In my opinion if the PC is so slow its painful to use
And the only fix is to replace he Motherboard
Then that is a repair

It wasn?t that slow when they paid for it so it must be faulty
To bad for MS if it?s their service pack slowing it to a crawl

There is also the case of a defective CPU
To bad for MS if you cant find one to fit the Motherboard
It has to be repaired and to do that the motherboard has to be replaced

There are many reasons that a motherboard has to be replaced as part of a repair

And like I said they can only say no

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called activation center

by rtroy56 In reply to You don't need to!

When the activation wizard told me to call Microsoft, I did. They told me to call HP. HP charged me $50 and then told me they couldn't do anything (I did eventually get the money back).

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