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Opinion for my recruitment portal idea

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Opinion for my recruitment portal idea

aa.jain04
I am creating a recruitment portal for IT professionals.

In this, recruiters while creating a job post would be asked to create a skills requirement matrix.

Essential Skills : asp.net MVC Entity Framework
Desired Skills : SQL Server 2008 IIS 7.0

On the other hand job seekers would also have their own skills matrix

Jobseeker #1

Core Skills : asp.net MVC Entity Framework MangoDB
Secondary Skills : SQL Server 2008 IIS 7.0

Jobseeker #2

Core Skills : asp.net Web forms
Secondary Skills : SQL Server 2008 IIS 7.0
So when both job seekers apply for the same job.

Would it be a good idea for both of them to see each other's skills matrix for comparison? Also no personal details and CVs are shared.

I think comparisons would help job seekers to understand what their areas of improvement are and could motivate to fill the skills gap.

Your opinion would be appreciated.

Regards
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    1 Votes
    robo_dev

    If I was an employer looking for a developer, how do you assess who has real experience vs those who believe that they have the experience?

    A college student with zero experience can say that they have SQL server skills, as can a person who worked as a dBA for 20 years.

    The CV is the only way to gain assurance that someone has the skills and also to accurately measure how experienced a candiate really is.

    What would be helpful would be for recruiters to report on what the most requested skills are, over time. So if over six months the recuiter has seen 50 DBA positions, then provide some numbers on the most requested database skills.

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    JamesRL

    I've interviewed and hired a fair number of developers in the last 10 years.

    There is a huge delta between, used in school, or done a couple of small projects, in a technology and used the technology in some major applications. It isn't even necessarily about how long you've used a technology, it is how deep you got into it, and how you used it.

    I've used Excel for over 20 years, but I am no expert. I'ved Visio for a quarter of that time, and I'm pretty good.

    The matrix might help you weed out people you don't need to interview, but it won't help you make a hiring decision. That is what interviews are for.

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    1 Votes
    robo_dev

    If I was an employer looking for a developer, how do you assess who has real experience vs those who believe that they have the experience?

    A college student with zero experience can say that they have SQL server skills, as can a person who worked as a dBA for 20 years.

    The CV is the only way to gain assurance that someone has the skills and also to accurately measure how experienced a candiate really is.

    What would be helpful would be for recruiters to report on what the most requested skills are, over time. So if over six months the recuiter has seen 50 DBA positions, then provide some numbers on the most requested database skills.

    +
    0 Votes
    JamesRL

    I've interviewed and hired a fair number of developers in the last 10 years.

    There is a huge delta between, used in school, or done a couple of small projects, in a technology and used the technology in some major applications. It isn't even necessarily about how long you've used a technology, it is how deep you got into it, and how you used it.

    I've used Excel for over 20 years, but I am no expert. I'ved Visio for a quarter of that time, and I'm pretty good.

    The matrix might help you weed out people you don't need to interview, but it won't help you make a hiring decision. That is what interviews are for.