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PC Performance

By jimmythegreek3 ·
Trying to open an excel application but it is taking an hour to doing calculations. Then message appears machine has run out of virtual Memory

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by brian In reply to PC Performance

You have a problem with the spreadsheet file itself to find out I would do the following.
Try running scandisk first to see if that fixes the problem.
Also check for disk free space- maybe your hard drive is full.
In addition I would considermanually setting the size of your virtual memory file to 2x or 2.5x your physical memory.
If possible copy the file to disk or email it to another computer and try running it from a machine that is known to work.

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by brian In reply to PC Performance

I meant to type that you MAY HAVE A PROBLEM WITH THE SPREADSHEET FILE ITSELF. You won't know until taking the steps above.

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by jimmythegreek3 In reply to PC Performance

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by TimTheToolMan In reply to PC Performance

Hi,

I'd suspect that your PC is an older one and doesn't have enough memory to load the spreadsheet and do the calculations. Thats why it takes so long - it has to go to disk for "virtual memory" - thousands of times slower than main memory.

If you DO have enough memory, then the first answer is probably right in that there is a problem with the spreadsheet itself. If thats the case, then I'd suspect that it is a problem with massive recursion or infinite looping in its calculations.

This would definitely be the case if the spreadsheet seems small.

Turn off autocalculation and load the spreadsheet. See if you can do that much at least. Then perform a "calculate now" and see if thats when it dies.

Hope this helps,
Cheers,
Tim.

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by jimmythegreek3 In reply to PC Performance

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by superman79 In reply to PC Performance

I would agree with Timthetoolman. If in fact you do have an older model computer check if you have enough memory available. If not you will probably have to upgrade your memory to twice of what you have now.

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by jimmythegreek3 In reply to PC Performance

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by RJBoudreaux Contributor In reply to PC Performance

If you are running Win9x you can right click on My Computer, click Properties, and click the Performance tab, then click on the Virtual Memory button. This will tell you the current virtual memory settings. By default this setting allows Windows toautomatically adjust the amount of virtual memory based on the amount of free disk space available. You can also manually set virtual memory to a user defined amount; however, this is usually not recommend in the Win9x operating system environment, unless you keep a daily watch on the amount of free disk space on the drive you can get into performance trouble here. If disk free space is the problem, move files from the partition that has the virtual memory swap file to another partition, or delete files that you do not need. Please be careful with this, as you do not want to be deleting system and resource files from your hard drive. One typical folder that takes up excess disk space is the Temp folder, and most files located here can be deleted. Be sure to remove all files from the recycle bin also.

If you are running WinNT or 2000 the typical virtual memory settings are to begin the range of the swap file at 11 MB above your installed RAM, and up to 75 MB above that initial setting. For example, if you have 128 MB RAM installed, you would have the swap file range of 139- 214. You can also setup a swap file on another partition following the same settings as above; however, I would not have more than two swap files running as this can actually slow down performance. Another item in WinNT/2000 is the Maximum Registry Size limit. Take a look the current size and the set maximum size, you can set this maximum limit size to 30 MB and this usually solves some of the performance issues as well.

- Ryan Boudreaux

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by jimmythegreek3 In reply to PC Performance

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by jimmythegreek3 In reply to PC Performance

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