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Should I leave Microsoft for Linux?

Tags: Microsoft
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0 Votes

Should I leave Microsoft for Linux?

Gratus
I am a Ms Word 2010 'specialist' who use hundreds of autocorrect entries for my native language, Afrikaans, which needs diacritical signs, and also use some macros. (Win 8.1 OS, mouse on desktop). I have been with Ms Word since 1989 (remember the brave Word for Dos 4 and 5?). What are the pros for and cons against switching to Open Office? My previous short experience, about 5 years ago with Open Source's Word Processor was that it was rather clumsy and less developed than Ms Word. Is it as user-friendly and intuitive as Word? I am doing text editing all the time. I paid for Win 8.1 and a new box 4 months ago, and should be willing to pay for Open Source as well. And yes: I will have to completely change my platform (steep learning curve): Bye Windows 8.1, bye Windows-only programs. Hopefully Linux will talk to my 4 years old Canon MF 4350 three in one Printer, which Win 8.1 flatly refuses to do...

Member Comments

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      1 Votes
      btljooz

      Why are you considering this move? Answer that question to yourself and then incorporate that answer into your decision making process. Yes, as HAL has pointed out there are some rather pointed caveats to changing OSes. But, it can be done as there are MANY who have done and are doing it.

      To see if you like Linux and/or any of its Distributions you CAN try out any Linux Distro from Live CD to see what you think of it. (I, personally, would suggest PCLinuxOS with the KDE user interface. Simply download it's ISO and burn it to CD with an ISO burner such as Nero or ISO Recorder by Alex Feinman. Then boot to that live CD to actually get a taste of using that distro and whatever software is packaged with it without even touching your hard drive at all.

      You can get help with your migration to Linux both from on-line forums and if you have a Linux User Group in your area. Just to a search for "<i>Where you live</i> Linux User Group" to see what you can find. Your local LUG will be more than happy to help you out. My LUG has been invaluable to me!

      I would suggest that while you migrate you run a dual boot configuration so that you can still use Windows, but be able to boot into Linux when you want to in order to familiarize yourself with it. As with learning Windows you will have to have some patience and work through the process of learning Linux. It's just like learning anything new.

      As for LibreOffice (a much better fork from Open Office) vs. MS Office [to me] LibreOffice is like MS Office with some of the air let out. It doesn't have nearly the advanced options that MS Office has, but on the flip side of that coin it has some options that MS Office does not have, too. You can download and install Libre Office on Windows to use and learn so that when you do complete your migration to Linux you'll be ahead of the game on that front. I have both MS Office 2003 and LibreOffice installed on my XP machine and they both come in handy for the things that they do best. And, the nice thing about Linux is that you can run Windows apps like Office through Wine and run both on Linux, too, if you prefer. Check out Wine at https://winehq.org/ Wine is a bit slow for the faster Windows games, but for an office suite it would be just fine.

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      0 Votes
      Sue T

      I found the driver on canon's site without a problem and also found info that may help you on this site. http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-hardware/windows-8-cant-find-canon-mf4350d-printer-driver/1dc8d8ca-5ebc-45a0-9a76-c0e9b29d4a83
      I have a newly bought windows8.1(64bit) laptop. I went through the same frustration of not able to install MF4350D. Aftewr spending hours on web without no avail, I downloaded the win8(64bit) driver from Canon website. After unzipping the downloaded file, I tried adding the printer by "Have Disk" and point to the "Drive" subdir, I was able to install the printer.

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      0 Votes
      Sue T

      I found the driver on canon's site without a problem and also found info that may help you on this site. http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-hardware/windows-8-cant-find-canon-mf4350d-printer-driver/1dc8d8ca-5ebc-45a0-9a76-c0e9b29d4a83
      I have a newly bought windows8.1(64bit) laptop. I went through the same frustration of not able to install MF4350D. Aftewr spending hours on web without no avail, I downloaded the win8(64bit) driver from Canon website. After unzipping the downloaded file, I tried adding the printer by "Have Disk" and point to the "Drive" subdir, I was able to install the printer.

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      0 Votes
      HAL 9000 Moderator

      Like you I've been using a Word Processor for a very long time but unlike you it was Word Perfect which I still use to this day.

      I tried Word when it was first integrated into MS Office and hated it and have never seriously used it since. It just lacks the things that Word Perfect has which keeps it Light Years ahead of Word. Of course because I use WP heavily I know where things are and how it works and use a lot of things that Microsoft has yet to incorporate into Word.

      The Bad News is that while Liber Office is good because of what you are likely to already use your current documents will not be easily openably in Liber Office or more correctly will not be formatted properly when you try to open them in a different program. It's exactly the same as when you try to open a word document written in 2003 in Word 2013. It sort of works but not properly.

      If you really want to leave Microsoft behind there is going to be a very steep Learning Curve and lots of rewriting existing documents that are still being used. Not to mention wh

    • +
      0 Votes
      HAL 9000 Moderator

      Like you I've been using a Word Processor for a very long time but unlike you it was Word Perfect which I still use to this day.

      I tried Word when it was first integrated into MS Office and hated it and have never seriously used it since. It just lacks the things that Word Perfect has which keeps it Light Years ahead of Word. Of course because I use WP heavily I know where things are and how it works and use a lot of things that Microsoft has yet to incorporate into Word.

      The Bad News is that while Liber Office is good because of what you are likely to already use your current documents will not be easily openably in Liber Office or more correctly will not be formatted properly when you try to open them in a different program. It's exactly the same as when you try to open a word document written in 2003 in Word 2013. It sort of works but not properly.

      If you really want to leave Microsoft behind there is going to be a very steep Learning Curve and lots of rewriting existing documents that are still being used. Not to mention wh

      +
      0 Votes
      Sue T

      I found the driver on canon's site without a problem and also found info that may help you on this site. http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-hardware/windows-8-cant-find-canon-mf4350d-printer-driver/1dc8d8ca-5ebc-45a0-9a76-c0e9b29d4a83
      I have a newly bought windows8.1(64bit) laptop. I went through the same frustration of not able to install MF4350D. Aftewr spending hours on web without no avail, I downloaded the win8(64bit) driver from Canon website. After unzipping the downloaded file, I tried adding the printer by "Have Disk" and point to the "Drive" subdir, I was able to install the printer.

      +
      0 Votes
      Sue T

      I found the driver on canon's site without a problem and also found info that may help you on this site. http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-hardware/windows-8-cant-find-canon-mf4350d-printer-driver/1dc8d8ca-5ebc-45a0-9a76-c0e9b29d4a83
      I have a newly bought windows8.1(64bit) laptop. I went through the same frustration of not able to install MF4350D. Aftewr spending hours on web without no avail, I downloaded the win8(64bit) driver from Canon website. After unzipping the downloaded file, I tried adding the printer by "Have Disk" and point to the "Drive" subdir, I was able to install the printer.

      +
      1 Votes
      btljooz

      Why are you considering this move? Answer that question to yourself and then incorporate that answer into your decision making process. Yes, as HAL has pointed out there are some rather pointed caveats to changing OSes. But, it can be done as there are MANY who have done and are doing it.

      To see if you like Linux and/or any of its Distributions you CAN try out any Linux Distro from Live CD to see what you think of it. (I, personally, would suggest PCLinuxOS with the KDE user interface. Simply download it's ISO and burn it to CD with an ISO burner such as Nero or ISO Recorder by Alex Feinman. Then boot to that live CD to actually get a taste of using that distro and whatever software is packaged with it without even touching your hard drive at all.

      You can get help with your migration to Linux both from on-line forums and if you have a Linux User Group in your area. Just to a search for "<i>Where you live</i> Linux User Group" to see what you can find. Your local LUG will be more than happy to help you out. My LUG has been invaluable to me!

      I would suggest that while you migrate you run a dual boot configuration so that you can still use Windows, but be able to boot into Linux when you want to in order to familiarize yourself with it. As with learning Windows you will have to have some patience and work through the process of learning Linux. It's just like learning anything new.

      As for LibreOffice (a much better fork from Open Office) vs. MS Office [to me] LibreOffice is like MS Office with some of the air let out. It doesn't have nearly the advanced options that MS Office has, but on the flip side of that coin it has some options that MS Office does not have, too. You can download and install Libre Office on Windows to use and learn so that when you do complete your migration to Linux you'll be ahead of the game on that front. I have both MS Office 2003 and LibreOffice installed on my XP machine and they both come in handy for the things that they do best. And, the nice thing about Linux is that you can run Windows apps like Office through Wine and run both on Linux, too, if you prefer. Check out Wine at https://winehq.org/ Wine is a bit slow for the faster Windows games, but for an office suite it would be just fine.