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Supernetting?

By ttran ·
Hi all,

How can I create a different scope using the same network IP address. For instance, our main campus network is 172.1.x.x. Our remote sites also use 172.1.x.x host ID's ... how can I create a separate scope for these remote sites and DHCP Scope options for each of these scopes?

Does this involve supernetting??? Can someone explain to me what supernetting is and where I can get more info? thanks!

-t

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Supernetting?

by jprovost In reply to Supernetting?

Supernetting: borrows bits from the network ID and masks them as the host ID for more efficient routing.

For your case, I think this can help. First you need to calculate how many nodes you are going to have. Plan for growth in this estimate.

Let's say you needed 1800 nodes. You would then borrow 3 bits from the network ID, giving you a possible 2048 addresses. This would equate to 2032 nodes, the other 16 address are for the 8 network ID's you would need and their broadcast addresses. This subnet mask would be 255.255.248.0.

If I was coming off the internet and pinging you, a conventional routing table may look like: (where 172.1.1.1 is your router)

172.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.3.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.4.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.5.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.6.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.7.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1
172.1.8.0 255.255.255.0 172.1.1.1

After supernetting it would just be:
172.1.1.0 255.255.248.

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Supernetting?

by ttran In reply to Supernetting?

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Supernetting?

by fabolude In reply to Supernetting?

This doesn't require supernetting. It could require supernetting. The rules are:
On a given DHCP server, only one scope can be created per subnet and a scope cannot span multiple subnets.

You would subnet your remote sites using custom subnet masks and use this to create separate dhcp scopes on your server.

by setting up your routers appropriately, each subnet would receive it's ip data from the correct scope. You could/may/should also have a dhcp server on each subnet to limit network traffic andlocalise administration. This will produce the same results you want.

Supernetting enables you treat several contiguous class b or c network domains as a single domain class to increase the number of hosts on your network. You have a class b domain. You would need to have enough more class b domain ids (Internic wont give it to you) in order to supernet. It doesn't solve your problems - it only adds to them.

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Supernetting?

by ttran In reply to Supernetting?

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Supernetting?

by jprovost In reply to Supernetting?

An addendum to my last posting as it was cut off....

The other gent was right, it does not require supernetting, but if you are looking for a large flat network it would help.

Though I would recommend having multiple DHCP servers and backup's. (Donot use only one DHCP Server and rely on the DHCP relay agent.)

From my perception, It sounds like you have one flat network, and superneting would work.

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Supernetting?

by ttran In reply to Supernetting?

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Supernetting?

by ttran In reply to Supernetting?

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