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System Log Events

By Dragon Emperor ·
I recently replaced by 2) 80GB drives with 2) 200GB drives. I am running Windows 2000 SP4 and large drive support is enabled. I ran Seagate's utility and it reports both drives are fine, as does chkdsk. Yet every time I boot I get the following errors:

Source: IdeChnDr Cat: None Event: 9
The device, \Device\Ide\IdeDeviceP0T0L0, did not respond within the timeout period.

Source: ESENT Cat: Logging/Recovery Event: 413
services (236) Unable to create the log. The drive may be read-only, out of disk space, misconfigured, or corrupted. Error -1022.

Source: ESENT Cat: Performance Event: 0
services (236) Unexpected Win32 error: 0x79

Source: Disk Cat: None Event: 51
An error was detected on device \Device\Harddisk0\DR0 during a paging operation.
NOTE: There are 4 of these followed by the event 9 in the System Log.

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by CG IT In reply to System Log Events

most of the large drive support topics on Microsoft's Help & Support deal with slow responding large drives when you use drives larger that 137GB using 48bit block addressing with Service Pack 2 fixing this. Your problem doesn't seem to fall into these catagories.

That leads to asking how you went about replacing the old drives with the new ones. Drive Copy? reinstall from system state backup? Clean install? And did you install Seagates drive overlay program?

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by Dragon Emperor In reply to

I used PowerQuest DriveImage 2002 to copy and resize the partitions to the new drives. I did not use their DiscWizard since I was imaging. I did use their tools to scan the drives.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to System Log Events

it's having trouble talking to drive fast enuf.
you sure you have correct special cable with termination? you have terminiation turned on in scsi adapter, yes?
supposedly low level format has been known to cure these errors (gulp!)
maybe drive is too fast for processor...
i would like to help more for all those luscious points but insufficent data...
look for horses not zebras is my 2 cents.
here is interesting article from which above ideas come:
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - 154690

How to Troubleshoot Event 9 and Event 11 Error Messages
View products that this article applies to.
This article was previously published under Q154690
For a Microsoft Windows XP version of this article, see 314093.
SUMMARY
This article describes how to troubleshoot the event ID 9 or event ID 11 error messages. The following event ID messages may be logged in your system log (use Event Viewer to view the log), although the source can be any controller name (for example, Atdisk, Atapi, or Sparrow):

Event ID: 9
Source: aic78xx
Description: The device, \Device\ScsiPort0, did not respond within the timeout period.
-or-
Event ID: 11
Source: aic78xx
Description: The driver detected a controller error on Device\ScsiPort0.
In almost all cases, these messages are being posted due to hardware problems with either the controller or, more likely, a device that is attached to the controller in question. The hardware problems can be associated with poor cabling, incorrect termination or transfer rate settings, lazy or slow device responses to relinquish the SCSI bus, a faulty device, or, in very rare cases, a poorly written device driver.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

MORE INFORMATION
The following are some troubleshooting tips to help diagnose and pinpoint the problem:
Read the SCSI controller manufacturer's technical manual to determine the termination requirements. Many modern SCSI controllers require active terminators (at least one of the devices on the bus must provide termination power). Proper termination involves both a terminator (resistor) and a device that supplies a signal to the bus for termination power. The SCSI-2 standard specifies that a controller (initiator) must supply termination power. Therefore, any controller that claims to be SCSI-2 compatible probably does supply termination power, but you should check if you are unsure. Also, many devices, especially drives, give you the option of providing termination power; if you have a jumper on the drive that reads Trmpwr, you should enable this jumper.

If both internal and external SCSI devices are attached, make sure the last device on each SCSI chain is terminated, and that intermediary devices are not.
If only a single SCSI chain is used (either all internal or external), ensure the last device of the SCSI chain is terminated and the SCSI controller itself is terminated. This is usually a BIOS setting.
Check for loose or poor quality SCSI cabling. When you have a long chain of cables with mixed internal and external cabling, you run the risk of degrading the signal. Even though the SCSI specification may specify a long distance, the specification assumes cabling that allows no leakage or interference, and the reality is generally a shorter distance. Whenever you have 6-foot or longer external cables, you should replace them with 3-foot cables.
Note when the event messages are posted and try to determine if it coincides with certain processing schedules (such as backups) or heavy disk processing. This will help to determine what device may be causing the errors.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

NOTE: The reason that drives tend to have these types of problems under heavy stress is often slow microprocessors. In a multitasking environment, the processor may not be fast enough to process all the I/O commands that come in nearly simultaneously.
Slow the transfer rate settings if the timeouts are associated with tape drives - using 5MBS transfer rate usually cures the timeouts.
Simplify the SCSI/IDE chain by removing devices, or move the device in question to another controller. If the problem follows the device, you should replace it.
Check the revision of SCSI controller BIOS and device firmware revisions. Contact the manufacturer for the latest revisions. See the Checking the Model Number and Firmware Revision section below for the procedure on how to do this.
Check the SCSI device drivers version. The SCSI driver is located in the %Systemroot%\System32\Drivers directory. Look at the version in the file properties, and check whether the SCSI manufacturer has a newer version.
Remove other controllers that may create bus contention problems.
A low-level format performed by the SCSI controller may resolve these event messages.
Use a different make or model of any suspect hardware.
Checking the Model Number and Firmware Revision
The model number of the device and firmware revision are in the Windows registry. To check the model number and firmware revision, follow the steps below.

Run Regedt32.exe.
Locate and click the following registry key, where x varies according to device number:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Hardware\Devicemap\Scsi\ScsiPortx\ScsiBusx\ TargetIdx\LogicalUnitIdx

Look at the REG_SZ identifier value to see the model number and firmware revision values. For example, in the following value, the firmware revision value is 0510:
SEAGATE ST32430N 0510

Record all the device model numbers and firmware revisions, and check with the manufacturer for any known issues.

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by Dragon Emperor In reply to

They are IDE Drives. I have a 3.06GHz Pentium 4 with Hyperthreading enabled. I have 2GB of RAM. Every time the system boots it gives a series of 15 events of the types previously listed. Then after 4 minutes it starts giving event 51 until the system becomes unstable (only using IE seems to trip the response, but once it does the system no longer works without a hard reboot). I have already checked all cables and jumpers.

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by Don_C In reply to System Log Events

Try fixing master boot record I when imaging drive always best to fix the mbr before doing anything in some cases it doesn't matter But for maost cases its what the doctor orders

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by Dragon Emperor In reply to

Would that affect the logging? The system boots fine.

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by Don_C In reply to System Log Events

you copy from 80gig to 200gig even if they were then same manufactor the mbr still pass the infomation along

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by Dragon Emperor In reply to

There was no change in the events after attempting to repair this with the recovery console.

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