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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

By hylton ·
I am wanting to establish a +-20 machine network at my home. I will be using a Linux box as a router and was wondering what the IP addresses would be as well as the subnet masks. I will access the internet via the router and a dial-up connection at various times.

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by kshum In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

you can use the nonrouting ip address such as
10.x.x.x, 192.168.x.x, 172.[16-31].x.x and use what ever netmask you want as long as it fits in ip range

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by hylton In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

A little more detail regarding the adress range make ups and how to pick15 or so nodes.

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by Kevin M. Hirahara In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

Hello,

Kshum is very correct.

With the creation of RFC 1597, RFC 1627, and most recently RFC 1918, the addresses he listed were given special purpose and were removed from being routable addresses on the Internet. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) actually reserved those three blocks of IP address space for private networks (x.255.255.255, being the broadcast):

10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255

These addresses were designed for internal address space only and will not conflict with any public IP schemes.

Regards,

Kevin.

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by hylton In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by McKayTech In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

The answers above are correct for your internal network. I generally just use 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254 for my addresses and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
That gives me roughly 250 addresses to work with.

On the outside world, your IP address and subnet mask will be determined by your ISP. The subnet mask is often Class C (255.255.255.0) but not always so you'll need to get that information from them. (For example, my ISP uses a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128 even though it is a Class A address block).

One suggestion I might make would be to consider using the Linux Router Project software rather than a full distribution. You can run it from a floppy on a 486/16meg of RAM with no hard drive and most of the configuration work is already done, both for dialup and broadband connections.

paul

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by hylton In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by wlbowers In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

With this many machines you better go with cable or dsl. If they aren't avaible isdn.

If you can go with cable or dsl get a Gateway firewall and let it dish out the ip's.

If you have to go with dialup the the answer that suggested the 10.0.0.0255.255.255.0 is the way to go.

Good Luck Lee

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by hylton In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

Seeing as via the email address you could see that I am based in South Africa and that we do not have the DSL ability here with our monopolistic telecoms provider.

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by hylton In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

Some of the answers recd have been helpful in that they have mentioned the IP ranges I could use but I would appreciate someone telling me how to work out the subnets and IP numbers if I chose one which would give me up to 254 addresses.

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The TCP/IP protocol for home use

by estebandelatorre In reply to The TCP/IP protocol for h ...

Consider using 192.168.10.x MASK 255.255.255.0 as an example. Don't worry about how many, due to the fact that you will access internet using NAT (that is to said: all machines from your network will access internet (using linux public ip address) as if they are the linux box itself.
The problem with subnets came, when you need to setup a large number of machines with real public ip address. Since your side will be a private lan, you can set the number of host that you want.

help it's usefull

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