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Ubuntu - For a MS Freak a god choice?

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Ubuntu - For a MS Freak a god choice?

maxpowers410
Ok, Im an MS freak all the way, had a look at linux a few times and never really got the hang of it. Im thinking of just installing ubuntu on my notebook and hopping for the best. Everything I use is bsed on windows, my phone with sync, all my programms, my mail etc.
I know with time Ill find the rigght alternatives, just ondering if someone can share they're experiences with me, whether I should stick to mx xp or jump into linux...
thanks in advance...
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    Deadly Ernest

    at Kubuntu, the KDE variant of Ubuntu - but get 8.04 or before as 8.10 and since have KDE 4 while the others have KDE 3.5 or earlier. KDE 3.5 has a very Win 98 look to it so you should feel more comfortable with it. MepisLinux, PCLinux, and Linspire all have a very Windows feel too and are very good. I suggest you get some of the free discs sent to you so you can run the Live Disc version and see what they look like before you install them.

    Switching to Linux will reduce the dangers from many of the virus and trojan attacks but won't eliminate them. It will make some things easier while making others harder. It is harder to run some Windows compatible software and hardware.

    My personal suggestion is you take your time. Stay with your working XP until it next breaks down on you. In the meantime get some Linux discs or download the ISOs and make some discs, and try the Live Disc versions until you find one your happy with. Also, take your time looking for alternate applications for what you currently use. Many will come on the CDs from the Linux companies if you get them But you can also use resources such as:

    http://osliving.com/index.php

    http://www.linux.org/projects/

    http://www.kubuntu.org/index.php

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Medibuntu

    http://www.winehq.org/

    https://www.mepis.org/mirrors

    http://www.codeweavers.com/products/cxlinux/

    http://www.cedega.com/

    Wine, Crossover, and Cedega allow you to run Windows based stuff in Linux.

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    jck

    DE is right. KDE 3.5 is VERY Windows-user friendly. Ubuntu (which has Gnome) would take a little more getting used to.

    I have Ubuntu w/KDE 4 on it installed on my HTPC in the front room and don't like it that well, although it's not hard to learn to use.

    Good luck with your Linux experience.

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    ---TK---

    Kubuntu or Ubuntu are great starting points, I would say they are one of the most forgiving distro's to work with. 8.04 and 8.10 are great Versions, 9.04 is somewhat stable there are a few glitches, but I still use it.

    If you choose to go with these distro's, I would highly recommend installing EnvyNG (will chooses what graphic driver is best for your PC) Compiz (will **** your mind with eye candy, as long as you have the proper graphic drivers installed), Wine (Usually will run .exe's)... those are the big ones.

    Although I disagree with Ernest on Linspire, from what I remember they attempt to get you to purchase downloads and updates.... They are formally know as Lindows (MS payed them off to change their name)... Im just not a fan of Lindows, everything else Ernest said I would agree with though!

    A great site to watch is distrowatch.com. Best of luck!

    Added: Install VLC...! its the fastest way to get MP3's and video's to "just work".

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    jck

    Distrowatch is an awesome site to get info on distro releases and such.

    There is also a couple linux wikis that have everything from install advice to the particulars on setting up wireless devices using things like ndiswrapper and such.

    Awesome stuff :)

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    Tony Hopkinson

    Portables are iffy. In particular just because one works with a live cd, doesn't mean an install will.

    SimplyMepis was my get started choice and the only one that didn't lie it's arse off about whether it was going to work with the old toshiba I was loading it on.

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    Slayer_

    I suggest trying out Ubuntu on a virtual machine. Like most nix distros, Ubuntu follows the you either love it or you hate it atitude when your switching.

    Mandriva is also "cool" but so far, the latest and greatest version is buggy as ****. In an hour of use I can crash the "task bar" 4 times. The simple process of adding and removing widgets will take it down 50% of the time. On the other side, much of Mandriva's controls are very simple to use. Unless of course you intent to go browsing folders. I have yet to figure out how the **** to actually go into my Home folder.

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    ---TK---

    when you throw it into a VM machine, you don't really get the full effect... Such as compiz (fan) doesn't run... VM is a nice way, but it really limits you on the power of what you can do... maybe duel boot might be another option...

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    Slayer_

    Just cause drives on laptops can be so picky, Windows can thru a fit if you do that. You can also run into issues because of the restore partitions.

    Installing onto a flashdrive or memory card would be more ideal.

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    ---TK---

    I forgot about restore partitions... lol, I never use them... I always **** everything away when I get a new laptop and make a ghost image of the new OS...
    added: good point.

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    ws3d

    ...make sure any and all data on the laptop you care about is burned to DVD or a jump drive and you have all the software necessary to get Windows up and running again. OR take the short and sweet route of making an image of the laptop. Hope all goes well and have fun!
    I would lean towards the Kubuntu distro. Fedora is also fairly easy on a newbie. Try several but the KDE recommendation for a desktop is a good one.

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    0 Votes
    Deadly Ernest

    at Kubuntu, the KDE variant of Ubuntu - but get 8.04 or before as 8.10 and since have KDE 4 while the others have KDE 3.5 or earlier. KDE 3.5 has a very Win 98 look to it so you should feel more comfortable with it. MepisLinux, PCLinux, and Linspire all have a very Windows feel too and are very good. I suggest you get some of the free discs sent to you so you can run the Live Disc version and see what they look like before you install them.

    Switching to Linux will reduce the dangers from many of the virus and trojan attacks but won't eliminate them. It will make some things easier while making others harder. It is harder to run some Windows compatible software and hardware.

    My personal suggestion is you take your time. Stay with your working XP until it next breaks down on you. In the meantime get some Linux discs or download the ISOs and make some discs, and try the Live Disc versions until you find one your happy with. Also, take your time looking for alternate applications for what you currently use. Many will come on the CDs from the Linux companies if you get them But you can also use resources such as:

    http://osliving.com/index.php

    http://www.linux.org/projects/

    http://www.kubuntu.org/index.php

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Medibuntu

    http://www.winehq.org/

    https://www.mepis.org/mirrors

    http://www.codeweavers.com/products/cxlinux/

    http://www.cedega.com/

    Wine, Crossover, and Cedega allow you to run Windows based stuff in Linux.

    +
    0 Votes
    jck

    DE is right. KDE 3.5 is VERY Windows-user friendly. Ubuntu (which has Gnome) would take a little more getting used to.

    I have Ubuntu w/KDE 4 on it installed on my HTPC in the front room and don't like it that well, although it's not hard to learn to use.

    Good luck with your Linux experience.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    Kubuntu or Ubuntu are great starting points, I would say they are one of the most forgiving distro's to work with. 8.04 and 8.10 are great Versions, 9.04 is somewhat stable there are a few glitches, but I still use it.

    If you choose to go with these distro's, I would highly recommend installing EnvyNG (will chooses what graphic driver is best for your PC) Compiz (will **** your mind with eye candy, as long as you have the proper graphic drivers installed), Wine (Usually will run .exe's)... those are the big ones.

    Although I disagree with Ernest on Linspire, from what I remember they attempt to get you to purchase downloads and updates.... They are formally know as Lindows (MS payed them off to change their name)... Im just not a fan of Lindows, everything else Ernest said I would agree with though!

    A great site to watch is distrowatch.com. Best of luck!

    Added: Install VLC...! its the fastest way to get MP3's and video's to "just work".

    +
    0 Votes
    jck

    Distrowatch is an awesome site to get info on distro releases and such.

    There is also a couple linux wikis that have everything from install advice to the particulars on setting up wireless devices using things like ndiswrapper and such.

    Awesome stuff :)

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Portables are iffy. In particular just because one works with a live cd, doesn't mean an install will.

    SimplyMepis was my get started choice and the only one that didn't lie it's arse off about whether it was going to work with the old toshiba I was loading it on.

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    I suggest trying out Ubuntu on a virtual machine. Like most nix distros, Ubuntu follows the you either love it or you hate it atitude when your switching.

    Mandriva is also "cool" but so far, the latest and greatest version is buggy as ****. In an hour of use I can crash the "task bar" 4 times. The simple process of adding and removing widgets will take it down 50% of the time. On the other side, much of Mandriva's controls are very simple to use. Unless of course you intent to go browsing folders. I have yet to figure out how the **** to actually go into my Home folder.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    when you throw it into a VM machine, you don't really get the full effect... Such as compiz (fan) doesn't run... VM is a nice way, but it really limits you on the power of what you can do... maybe duel boot might be another option...

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    Just cause drives on laptops can be so picky, Windows can thru a fit if you do that. You can also run into issues because of the restore partitions.

    Installing onto a flashdrive or memory card would be more ideal.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    I forgot about restore partitions... lol, I never use them... I always **** everything away when I get a new laptop and make a ghost image of the new OS...
    added: good point.

    +
    0 Votes
    ws3d

    ...make sure any and all data on the laptop you care about is burned to DVD or a jump drive and you have all the software necessary to get Windows up and running again. OR take the short and sweet route of making an image of the laptop. Hope all goes well and have fun!
    I would lean towards the Kubuntu distro. Fedora is also fairly easy on a newbie. Try several but the KDE recommendation for a desktop is a good one.