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where to recover data to from a non bootable hdd

By maradonna ·
hi, a virus destroyed the boot on my hdd, and when trying to use recovery console in dos bootcfg- list-i get no boot entries and bootcfg-rebuild-corrupt file system and chdsk-appears to contain one or more unrecoverable problems.how can i recover the files on the hdd before i do a clean install of xp i would be grateful for any help

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Live CD or HDD slave

by TobiF In reply to where to recover data to ...

You need to boot from some other media to get a working system, then you can copy the needed data off the HDD.

One way is to boot up from a "live CD" or Live USB (look for Unetbootin).

Another option would be to temporarily take this HDD out of this computer and mount it as a slave HDD (or through a USB adapter) to a working computer, and that way get access.

If you boot off a linux distribution, make sure it has support for NTFS (nowadays, most have), if you boot off a windows installation, then you may need to "take ownership" before you're allowed to touch data under someones profile.

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Details on suggestion one above.

by dldorrance In reply to Live CD or HDD slave

This would be my preferred method. On a functioning computer with an internet connection and ability to burn a CD, download ISO version of a live Linux distribution and burn the image to a CD. Here is a link to one that should boot any modern personal computer:
http://www.linuxmint.com/blog/?p=847

Burn the ISO image onto a CD and insert the CD into your dead computer and run it. It will load Linux into the memory of the dead machine, hook up your network, monitor and peripherals, USB ports, etc, and display it's front page, which contains a "My Computer" icon in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Click on it and you see a file icon and a HDD icon. Click on the latter to view the contents of your dead computer's HDD. Copy what you like off that drive, probably starting with Documents and Settings, if the dead computer runs Windows.

Then reload the original OS onto your HDD and restore whatever you copied with the live CD.

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Linux Mint 7 vs ver 9?

by TobiF In reply to Details on suggestion one ...

I followed your link.
I noted it points to Linux Mint ver7, although version 9 is already available for download.

Is there any reason to still use version 7, rather than version 9?

Just curios :)

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Yes

by dldorrance In reply to Linux Mint 7 vs ver 9?

Version 9 of Mint is based on Ubuntu 10, which does not support Intel graphics engines; Mint 8 is based on Ubuntu 9 which only supports Intel graphics with an "alternate" install. That makes Mint 7, based on Ubuntu 8 the version that will work "out of the box" on computers with Intel graphics.

If I am wrong about this please let me know.

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Thanks

by TobiF In reply to Yes

I'm just listening (well, reading) and learning.
So - Thanks for this useful piece of information.

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Thank you both

by santeewelding In reply to Live CD or HDD slave

TobiF and dldorrance for that.

Though I have studied the steps here many times, for when or if I need them, I study them again from you both.

Too many times is not enough.

I am particularly grateful for heads-up about the little Mint icon in the left-hand corner, and exactly what to do with it.

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One more thing

by dldorrance In reply to Thank you both

You need to save what you extracted from the non-bootable HDD to another medium. I would use a USB HDD or a Thumb Drive. You could also send them over network or store them on the Internet. In all of the above, the live Linux will detect the new location(s).

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Noted.

by santeewelding In reply to One more thing

The OP can only benefit from all this, as I have.

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Another One more thing

by dldorrance In reply to Thank you both

You need to save what you extracted from the non-bootable HDD to another medium. I would use a USB HDD or a Thumb Drive. You could also send them over network or store them on the Internet. In all of the above, the live Linux will detect the new location(s).

Mint Linux is much like Windows. Right click on the screen to create a temporary directory and drag and drop files like Windows.

With Mint initially there are only 2 icons on an otherwise blank desktop. Access other functions from Menu in the lower right hand corner of the screen (like START in Windows).

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using ubcd and parted magic

by maradonna In reply to Live CD or HDD slave

cheers for the input tobif but using the boot cd and parted magic program i can see the files i want to copy but i dont know where to putthem to save them. as i will be formatting the disk to put xp back on it surely that will wipe my saved files? bear with me if this seems obtuse. stay cool in the shade mukker

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