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Windows 2000 Terminal Services Decision

By prontoro ·
First - a brief overview: we have 40 computers (not all on same hardware platform - Compaq/HP/Clone/IBM - nightmare). We have have 2 SQL servers running accounting/insurance programs and file/print server. We are looking to standardize the company(whether it be through hardware or software), implement an efficient disaster recovery plan for the desktops, & implement a remote access solution so employees can access the client/server applications that either run from the network (files are located on network) or have a SQL backend. A consultant has brought up Terminal Server and I am impressed by the technolgy but wondering if this solution is suitable as it could be costly. The IT dept. is a one person show for the most part so I am looking for a solution for the long haul with little administration once it is setup. I realize there may be compatability issues with the client/server apps and if they run on Terminal Server - but saying they do - would this be a proper solution? Any advice would be appreciated.
Thank you.

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Windows 2000 Terminal Services Decision

by McKayTech In reply to Windows 2000 Terminal Ser ...

I'm in the early stages of rolling out a Terminal Services project and it has worked very, very well. We are seeing very impressive performance even where the desktop is a 486/100 with 16meg of RAM and a 10meg NIC (from a users' perspective, programs load far faster than even with their PIII/600 desktops). However, we were blessed with a pair of very capable servers on the backend (Compaq Proliant 6500 with dual CPU, 4gig of RAM, RAID5 with 10k drives, teamed NIC, etc.).

We have had some problems with using W2K Terminal Services in an NT4 domain with profile conflicts but those will resolve when the domain architecture is upgraded.
There have also been some concerns from the programming folks because some of their queries to a backend Oracle database spike CPU utilization more than they expected.

From a support standpoint, it's been relatively light even during the rollout phase.

On the downsides, the licensing costs are not trivial and on the hardware side, what you save at the desktop will have to be spent at the server to maintain good performance. I honestly don't know how many users a single server will support and the published range seems to be from 25-80 depending on actual useage but that is part of what we're trying to determine.

The other part of the question is whether all of your mission-critical apps will run on Terminal Services and how many users will need something other than what's on the TS box. Down the road, we'll probably have two groups of users: standard with a WinTerm on the desktop running only Terminal Services and power users with a full desktop machine running a Terminal Services client as an application.

paul

The actual network traffic we're seeing is around 15k per active session so it works very well over a 56k dialup. What we don't know yet is how many users will fit on a T1.

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Windows 2000 Terminal Services Decision

by prontoro In reply to Windows 2000 Terminal Ser ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows 2000 Terminal Services Decision

by cames In reply to Windows 2000 Terminal Ser ...

Anyone wanting to roll out a Terminal Services solution should first read Windows NT/2000 Thin Client Solutions by Todd Mathers from Macmillan Technical Publishing (about $50 at Barnes & Noble). This covers all bases, including how to set up logon policies on the W2K TS to work properly with the NT 4 Domain without hosing up the regular NT 4 user's desktops.

Give yourself plenty of time, though. This book is 773 pages. When you read it, you go, "Wow, I'd have never thought of that." It goes indepth into how many processors you should plan for and how much memory will be needed for your userbase.

Plan on purchasing the W2K Resource Kit ($209 from B&N) which has s/w to help in configuration and more information on Policies that Todd does not cover (he tells you to go to the resource kit, since you need to get it anyway).

Todd also covers Citrix deployment, which you will need if you want the user to use TS and have access to his local disks and sound card.

If the apps you require all run on the TS, you are in good shape and I'd say this is your best solution. At $81 per TS CAL + $15 per W2K CAL (upgrade from NT 4), you are gaining central administration and speed.

You have to do some of your own calculations foryour environment, but from Todd's formulas, you should do well with a single 750MHz PIII processor and 2M memory to handle 40 users (and some room for expansion to boot!). But do a reality check.

Get the book. You won't be sorry.

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Windows 2000 Terminal Services Decision

by prontoro In reply to Windows 2000 Terminal Ser ...

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by prontoro In reply to Windows 2000 Terminal Ser ...

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