Questions

Adding a DSl line to existing network that has a partial T1

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Adding a DSl line to existing network that has a partial T1

carlosmarin321
I am adding a DSl (extreme) to an exisitng T1 that is a partial T1 and its slow, I purchased a DSL extreme to make the internet connection faster- I have 39 PC's on it- I connected the DSL router to one of the ports on the cisco switch- gave it an IP address different than the other two cisco routers and it seemed to slow down the internet- I added the DNS addresses of the new router to the pc's and it slowed it down- what am i missing? by itself off the network its very fast....

thanks,
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    CG IT

    you hooked up a DSL line from your ISP on to a switched port on a Cisco switch?

    what a novel approach.

    one would think that if the WAN ports are all used, heck just plug it in to a switched port. yeah! there ya go! Problem solved! but it doesn't work.

    the Switched port you connected the DSL line to needs an address [which the ISP assigns] it needs a subnet mask [which the ISP assigns] it needs a default gateway [which the ISP assigns] and it needs a DNS server [which the ISP assigns]. Then it will work.

    FNG!!!!!

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    carlosmarin321

    Actually I connected a Router from the ISP that they provided- gave it an ip address that matched the network xx.xx.xx.252 local-
    so what you mean is that I should not have assigned a local address to it and just use
    the dns it comes with and added to the local pc's?

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    CG IT

    DSL router into the the switch won't give you load balancing on a fractal T1 in. Both have to be connected to a router that has multiple WAN ports that can do Load Balancing.

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    rshack

    The problem is gateways, you only get one default gateway in Windows, right? So the internal net to a single router with 'outside' WAN ports is correct.

    You COULD designate a set of PC's ONLY for the DSL line by hard-setting IP information, and DSL is usually pretty reliable. If you seek true load balancing the first option applies.

    I had a Finance dept complaining about Interenet access so I put them on their own DSL line.

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    robo_dev

    As long as you address everything correctly, you could setup some PCs to use the DSL connection, and others to stay the way that they are.

    Assuming that the LAN address of the DSL router is correct for your network, and DHCP is turned off in the DSL router, then some workstations (like the boss's PC) could be configured to use the IP address of the DSL router as it's default gateway, and the others could be left alone to fight for their share of the T1 bandwidth.

    The better way to do this would be to define VLANs on the Cisco Switch and put the DSL router and the boss's PC in it's own VLAN, that way you could use DHCP without fear.

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    bwhalon

    I have been trying to get this to work for a few months but not had success. Did you get it to work? We have a managed firewall and I am not sure if that is blocking it or what?

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    ron

    It's much better to just get a full blown T1 Line due to the price reductions of T1's.

  • +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    you hooked up a DSL line from your ISP on to a switched port on a Cisco switch?

    what a novel approach.

    one would think that if the WAN ports are all used, heck just plug it in to a switched port. yeah! there ya go! Problem solved! but it doesn't work.

    the Switched port you connected the DSL line to needs an address [which the ISP assigns] it needs a subnet mask [which the ISP assigns] it needs a default gateway [which the ISP assigns] and it needs a DNS server [which the ISP assigns]. Then it will work.

    FNG!!!!!

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    0 Votes
    carlosmarin321

    Actually I connected a Router from the ISP that they provided- gave it an ip address that matched the network xx.xx.xx.252 local-
    so what you mean is that I should not have assigned a local address to it and just use
    the dns it comes with and added to the local pc's?

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    DSL router into the the switch won't give you load balancing on a fractal T1 in. Both have to be connected to a router that has multiple WAN ports that can do Load Balancing.

    +
    0 Votes
    rshack

    The problem is gateways, you only get one default gateway in Windows, right? So the internal net to a single router with 'outside' WAN ports is correct.

    You COULD designate a set of PC's ONLY for the DSL line by hard-setting IP information, and DSL is usually pretty reliable. If you seek true load balancing the first option applies.

    I had a Finance dept complaining about Interenet access so I put them on their own DSL line.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    As long as you address everything correctly, you could setup some PCs to use the DSL connection, and others to stay the way that they are.

    Assuming that the LAN address of the DSL router is correct for your network, and DHCP is turned off in the DSL router, then some workstations (like the boss's PC) could be configured to use the IP address of the DSL router as it's default gateway, and the others could be left alone to fight for their share of the T1 bandwidth.

    The better way to do this would be to define VLANs on the Cisco Switch and put the DSL router and the boss's PC in it's own VLAN, that way you could use DHCP without fear.

    +
    0 Votes
    bwhalon

    I have been trying to get this to work for a few months but not had success. Did you get it to work? We have a managed firewall and I am not sure if that is blocking it or what?

    +
    0 Votes
    ron

    It's much better to just get a full blown T1 Line due to the price reductions of T1's.