Questions

Asus Antisurge detected unstable powersupply...

Tags: Hardware
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Asus Antisurge detected unstable powersupply...

wompai
Hey guys,

Been a while since I posted on this forum, but i hope we can have a good discussion about this subject like I'm used to from this webpage :)

I have recently build a computer from new parts, bought them at a local tech-store. I made sure they where all compatible with each other. Now I have two issues, and I have no clue what they are... First of all, the CPU is an AMD FX-4130, it is mounted inside a motherboard that allowed AM3 CPUs. However, when I start it, it shows a message: "This CPU is not supported by the motherboard. Press f1 to resume." When I press f1 the computer continues to boot like nothing's wrong, all 4 cores are utilized as normal. It appears that because the CPU is one from a later series as the motherboard, all that is needed is a BIOS update.

The second issue is that fact that it shuts down after some time of gaming. When it reboots it gives me the message: "Power supply surges detected. Asus anti-surge has detected an unstable power-supply." This happened the first few times after about 30 minutes of gaming. The third time I had removed a cooler from the power supply. Now it lasted much longer, not sure if this is related to the problem though. I also had my hard-drive replaced in between the second and third occurrence of the shutdown, because it was old and was causing the computer to run slower then it should.

I am not sure if both problems are related, but I tried fixing the latter one by removing a couple fans.

I would like to hear your thoughts on this. Could it be a faulty power supply? Or is my CPU actually not compatible with the motherboard and causing these surges?

Thanks in advance.

The computer's specs:
CPU: AMD FX-4130
Motherboard: Asus M5A 78L-M LX3 series
Power supply: CoolerMaster B500 (500 W)
GPU: MSI GeForce GTX660 Twin Frozr III
RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu 8 GB (2 x 4 GB)

Member Answers

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      mjd420nova

      Removing the fan just took a little load off the PS so it lasted a bit longer before overheating. You may not notice any excess heat, but an transistor element generates a lot anyway, like a regulator, mounted to its own heatsink. I've replaced a few CoolerMaster units and they don't seem to be long lived units, about four years on the outside. Be sure you check the wattage (peak and average) ratings and maybe add an extra 50 W to give a little buffer.

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      wompai

      Thanks, I will definitely consider adding another 50W, maybe I'll even switch to a differend brand. We'll see how this works out.

      Thank you for taking the time to comment!

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      0 Votes
      mjd420nova

      Removing the fan just took a little load off the PS so it lasted a bit longer before overheating. You may not notice any excess heat, but an transistor element generates a lot anyway, like a regulator, mounted to its own heatsink. I've replaced a few CoolerMaster units and they don't seem to be long lived units, about four years on the outside. Be sure you check the wattage (peak and average) ratings and maybe add an extra 50 W to give a little buffer.

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      wompai

      Thanks, I will definitely consider adding another 50W, maybe I'll even switch to a differend brand. We'll see how this works out.

      Thank you for taking the time to comment!