Questions

Backup solutions - Part III

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Backup solutions - Part III

jdclyde
Ok everyone, here we go.

I have learned a lot in my last two Backup questions, so here we can try to pull it all together.

http://tinyurl.com/jd-backup1
Looking for ideas for Backups - 06/15/2009

http://tinyurl.com/jd-backup2
Can you image for backups? - 06/29/2009

===========================================

I admit to knowing the basics they teach you in the Admin classes, but need to update to the latest technology.

I have three servers, only one saves data.

Mentioned in the last question was a quote I got for $300/month for a managed solution. After explaining that was not in the realm of my reality, they came back with one for $150, but I don't think it does the server visualization the first one did.

This got me thinking, should I go with a NAS or one of the solutions that has removable hard drives that look like cartridges?

What is the benefit of one over the other?

What are good brands to go with, and which are good to avoid?

Took a quick look at different NAS solutions, and know right off the bat that I don't want anything to do with Dlink or Netgear. Not going to risk my reputation by saving a few bucks up front.

Does a NAS give me bare-metal recovery for multiple servers?

If I have a NAS, how do you get an off-site copy?

Or should I go with an updated Tape backup? Currently have a DAT72, and it just does NOT have the capacity required.
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    jdclyde

    http://tinyurl.com/JD-NAS-Option1

    Of course I would run it with mirror RAID.

    As my entire network isn't HALF a TB, the size is not an issue.

    Anyone use one of these before?

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    ssampier

    Your questions are pretty specific to your enterprise. I will admit I didn't read all the responses to your first two queries.

    How much backup space are we talking about? What is your backup window?

    I like disk-to-disk backup. I am not a fan of tape, it's slow and noisy. If you must archive for compliance, then D2D your new stuff and archive everything else after a set date.

    NAS is okay technology. They are relatively fast. Some are closed boxes so it's hard to reinstall the OS, though. You could probably achieve bare metal install with virtualization and/or the right software (Ghost). The NAS would just a storage box for the actual data (usually compressed images).

    I don't know your budget but virtualization and Ghost are not cheap. Of course your time is worth money, too.

    I like the simplicity of free open source rsync really. The advantage of rsync is does a direct copy of your files. Once the initial copy is done, it only copies the Delta. This means if Susie updates her spreadsheet and it changed only 1 MB, only 1 MB is transferred over.

    Rsync can run on windows, but you need to know CLI commands.

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    jdclyde

    The only things I care about are Disaster recovery and Cost. Making sure I have a safe/secure backup of the data in case of a server failure and that I could recover the server bare metal.

    I don't (to this point) deal with restoring deleted files for users, but maybe someday, and speed will still not be an issue.

    The Disk to Disk runs into the issue of how do you take a copy off-site?

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    shasca

    Are you familiar with shadow copy? It is a part of XP, Vista, and Server 2003. You just have to enable it. This can restore alot with paying for anything more than your OS purchase.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc785914(WS.10).aspx

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    jdclyde

    but I have some reading material for now....

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    jdclyde

    because of broken or long links....

    be-bopping between the different links, to get a feel for what is what... ya know?

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    The Scummy One

    they can recover their own deleted files


    Oops, I should have read Shasca's post first

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    shasca

    Is that a large footprint on my forehead?

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    The Scummy One

    then I edited it. No harm -- no footprint, just me bein a tard momentarily (I caught it in the next link I clicked).

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    shasca

    Is this yet another example of you sucking info out of my brain for your own evil purposes.

    Why yes, yes it is

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    The Scummy One

    as I have never heard of volume shadow copy before opening this thread :0

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    jdclyde

    but never knew exactly what it was or what it did.

    As shadows are the absence of light, and devoid of mass, how can they have volume? :0

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    shasca

    That to be a mere Shadow of a real observation, and or question.

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    jdclyde

    Yeah, go with that....

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    The Scummy One

    but I will not admit to more than momentarily!!!

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    shasca

    Hit up these guys to see if they can help you too.

    http://www.commvault.com/solutions-small-mid-enterprise-resource-center.html

    We have a lefthand solution that has had multiple hardware failures. They replaced the whole unit, and told us to hold on to the old. We now have a better storage system on our test environment than most companys have as their primary. They have greatly improved the product line.

    http://www.compaq.com/storage/software/clusteredfs/index.html

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    The Scummy One

    not exactly what you want (different target) but there may be some useful info in there.

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    CG IT

    Haven't really seen a definitive set of specifications on your needs for disaster recovery and data backup JD. Think if you have a definitive set of specs, getting the right hardware or software solutions would be easier.

    Never liked NAS. They have their own software. Just another set of software and licensing to track and maintain. If I was going for network storage, I'd just get a Windows or a Linux box, stuff it with hard drives and use that.

    If the current tape system doesn't have the capacity you need but tape meets the specs, I'd go with large capacity tape system. In todays business environment, I'm sure you can get great pricing.

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    jdclyde

    how do I get disaster recovery for two servers that have a lot of configuration but do not store data? Can't buy a tape drive for each of them, which is why in the second question I was toying with the idea of getting a disk image of them.

    This is such a pain, and is keeping me from doing "real" work.... ;\

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    0 Votes
    CG IT

    1: Disaster recovery for 2 servers
    a. servers have complex configurations that are not easily recreated
    b. servers need to be restored to current configuration with minimal effort.
    c. existing backup equipment does not have sufficent capacity to backup servers.

    Would upgrading existing equipment to larger capacity work?

    Backup software can, given sufficent hardware capacity, backup the entire servers including system state.

    I believe everyone here has given different methods to achieve the goal.

    All methods being equal, then price would be a deciding factor.

    Since one online storage company said they would provide the service for $1,800.00 per year, is there a lower cost method? In house only has the capital outlay without the $1,800.00 recurring costs [see Dell tape costs below].

    Acronis True Image Echo for Windows Server 2 licenses is $1,700.00 and doesn't include hardware.

    If you bought a couple of 1 TB external SATA hard drives for backup, probably cost you around $150.00 each [USB].

    They are portable.

    Going with upgrading the existing tape backup system probably would be a viable solution . The Dell LTO 1.5 TB tape solution runs about $1,700.00 without tapes. This is for 1 to 2 servers with no more than 1.5 TB of data. SCSI interface. Tapes 5 pack are around $350.00 each. Individual tape cost is $70.00 Doesn't include software to backup the data.

    Thats Dell. Typically, HP will be more expensive.

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    jdclyde

    downloaded the trial of Acronis home to play with at home.

    I can see that being a good solution for the NON-tape systems, combined with a few USB drives.

    Thanks, will keep everyone posted.

    jd

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    balge

    hi
    I was just wondering, surely you only need one licence for the server version, you only need to install on one machine as it can backup the other machines on the network as well as itself?
    this is a bit above my paygrade but I had a good look at the information on their website and couldn't work it out...
    also as far as I can tell you can store copies of the images anywhere on the net so you could add 'off-site backup' to your disaster recovery strategy if you had storage space elsewhere?
    cheers!

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    jdclyde

    http://tinyurl.com/USB-enclosure

    This option is more for the other servers that are currently not being backed up at all. Thinking get a few of these, one for each server.

    Currently looking hard at the Acronis True Image software to backup to the external drives.

    For the main SQL server, I am thinking upgrading the tape drive will be my best option for the lowest cost, since fast recovery of a single file here or there is not a concern of mine.

    Thoughts people?

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    shasca

    Long as you and Management are confortable with your backup scheme, and disaster recovery plan who are we to judge..........


    Looks like a good and simple to manage plan, that can be implemented at low cost. Go for it.

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    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    more looking for people who have been there, done that and what their experience has taught them.

    Trying to find a solution that I will be able to get approved. Right now, if we had a fire, we would be in big trouble. :0

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    shasca

    I was saying that you need to be comfortable with your solution. If you make decisions based solely on $ amounts but don't feel it is adequate. It isn't really a solution.

    I did continue and state that I thought with what you've got, and what you need it seemed like a good simple setup that would be easy to management.I just don't anything about how easy Ancronis is to manage. Thats the part I can't comment on. Backup software always seems to make a simple process more complicated than it needs to be. Arcserve seemed to get worse every time a patch or upgrade came out. Thus we are moving away from it to Commvault.

    Do enable Volume Shadow Copy also. When you can walk to someone's desktop have them right click a folder and copies of their data is right there at hand. You look like the hero of the day. Excellent for performance appraisals time too.

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    The Scummy One

    though!

    I recently got a freeagent 1.5 TB drive (seagate), and it worked fine for about a month -- then it started acting up. It does have a 5 yr warranty, so it shouldnt be an issue except for the data on it.
    Looking online, this is not uncommon for this unit either :0

    I have good luck with a caddy and other drives though.

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    jdclyde

    what caddy/drive combination have you used with favorable results?

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    CG IT

    Disliked their software.

    USB can take an god awful amount of time to copy stuff.

    JD, want some customer imput on external enclosures? try newegg.com and read through the customer reviews. now temper some of what the reviews say with the knowledge that some of them aren't all that savy at setup so they encounter problems and think it's the equipment, not them. Overall, though, the reviews are very informative.

    here's an example:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16817332011

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182144

    That's how I know it can take an awful amount of time to move stuff over USB 2.0.

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    The Scummy One

    over the USB drive, + it is mirrored, and uses a browser interface rather than installing SW on my system to connect it up.
    Personal preference.
    I have 2 hitachi 1TB drives in it currently, although there are issues with it (after connecting, the unit needs rebooting a second time to find them).
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822155003

    As for drives, I usually like seagate, but more recent ones seem to have a higher failure rate. I like hitachi as well.

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    jdclyde

    so you can get a rotation, how many of these enclosures do you use?

    How far back does it allow you to go on your current strategy?

    What do you do for year end or anything like that? Retire a drive from the enclosure?

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    The Scummy One

    I dont. I have the data on a USB drive backed up every month (about, or when I have time/remember)and unplugged, put in the other room.
    The main backups are on the mirrored NAS unit.

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    shasca

    I'm in the process of returning an I/O Magic 500G external drive. Lasted 3 mos. It isn't going well. I've been waiting for an RMA for almost a month now. So check them off the list too. **** we ordered through our Dell rep. WTH>>>>>>>>>

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    The Scummy One

    I prefer ones that I add my own HDD to. Just about everytime I get my hands on one that comes with a drive, the drive fails within a year.
    The problem is I usually just use adapters, not enclosures, and they leave the drive pretty exposed.

    A good USB enclosure should have an on/off switch and fans. The ones without fans allow heat to be trapped inside.

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    shasca

    You know anything about I/O Magic? I'm thinking the company is getting ready to "take a powder". They confirmed with my initial inquiry that the drive was under warrantee, and to fax in info for an RMA. Sitting here tapping toes and humming for a month now waiting for the return auth. Warrantee # went straight to voicemail, and they didn't call back. Guess it's what I get for trying to help the procurement guy. Shoulda left it to the expert.

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    The Scummy One

    I have heard of them, just no exp. with them.

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    OH Smeg

    That the drive is in. Many of these Big Drives are in Crap Enclosures that allow the Drives to Overheat when they are left running.

    For the Bigger 750 Gig + Drives they really need to be a a Actively Cooled Case with a Dedicated Power Supply anything less is just a recipe for disaster.

    I use a lot of the Antec MX1 Cases as they have both ESATA and USB interfaces and I've yet to have a problem with any drive in one of those. But to be fair I do use the higher G Rated Drives just in case.

    Col

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    jdclyde

    Ok, going and looking at hard drives, but I do not see a rating, let along a G rating?

    What is it, why do I want it, how do I find it?

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    OH Smeg

    Some of these are rated to a 50 G Impact. That are the ones that I use in External Enclosures while the Desktop computers get the cheaper 30 G Gravity rated drives in them.

    This is a measure of the force that can be applied to them in the Parked Nonruning condition without causing the heads to move from the parked positions, not the force that can be applied when they are running.

    I found that in the HDD Description at the makers Web Site when looking at which HDD is the best for which particular need. I'm not sure if it is listed on the actual Drives though.

    Cheers

    Col

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    The Scummy One

    now I wont have to freak out when I grab a HDD and take it on a bike trip with 20G cornering :^0

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    OH Smeg

    Are rated to a 30 G impact and not do any damage supposedly. :0

    But for those that I know are going to be moved around I prefer to use Drives with a Higher G Rating just to be on the safe side. I just don't trust the Users that I have all that much.

    But can I have the Police Photos that will be presented to the Coroner of you riding a bike that generates 20 G Cornering Loads? I would be great to show What Not To Do. :^0

    Col

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    Erik

    Where I am at I have a total of three servers. My DB server and Fax/AV Server backup to the main Win2k3 machine. On the Win2k3 machine I added an eSATA card and use a HD toaster. All information on the network is backed up in full each night to a 1TB drive in the toaster using the standard Win Backup program. Using two 1TB drives allows me to take the copy from the night before home with me and my lappy.

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    CG IT

    I've used some of the enclosures and they did heat up the hard drive considerably.

    I like the external enclosures to have some ventilation or a small fan for cooling.

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    NotSoChiGuy

    What I had setup once was a tape drive (SDLT 320, 1/8 autoloader, as I recall) attached to a HP NAS server.

    The overnight jobs would run to the NAS, and then during the day, I'd run a tape backup of the disk(s) to ship off site.

    This afforded us the protection of offsite storage, with the expedience of onsite data for restorations (especially helpful with DBs that get nightly refreshes). It also helped reduce failed backup jobs due to a bad tape or some other error.

    The cost was higher up front. However, it reduced the number of tapes we would have had to use, as well as the calls to retrieve tapes in order to perform a restore (those were $75 a pop from Iron Mountain, if I recall correctly).

  • +
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    jdclyde

    http://tinyurl.com/JD-NAS-Option1

    Of course I would run it with mirror RAID.

    As my entire network isn't HALF a TB, the size is not an issue.

    Anyone use one of these before?

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    0 Votes
    ssampier

    Your questions are pretty specific to your enterprise. I will admit I didn't read all the responses to your first two queries.

    How much backup space are we talking about? What is your backup window?

    I like disk-to-disk backup. I am not a fan of tape, it's slow and noisy. If you must archive for compliance, then D2D your new stuff and archive everything else after a set date.

    NAS is okay technology. They are relatively fast. Some are closed boxes so it's hard to reinstall the OS, though. You could probably achieve bare metal install with virtualization and/or the right software (Ghost). The NAS would just a storage box for the actual data (usually compressed images).

    I don't know your budget but virtualization and Ghost are not cheap. Of course your time is worth money, too.

    I like the simplicity of free open source rsync really. The advantage of rsync is does a direct copy of your files. Once the initial copy is done, it only copies the Delta. This means if Susie updates her spreadsheet and it changed only 1 MB, only 1 MB is transferred over.

    Rsync can run on windows, but you need to know CLI commands.

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    jdclyde

    The only things I care about are Disaster recovery and Cost. Making sure I have a safe/secure backup of the data in case of a server failure and that I could recover the server bare metal.

    I don't (to this point) deal with restoring deleted files for users, but maybe someday, and speed will still not be an issue.

    The Disk to Disk runs into the issue of how do you take a copy off-site?

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    0 Votes
    shasca

    Are you familiar with shadow copy? It is a part of XP, Vista, and Server 2003. You just have to enable it. This can restore alot with paying for anything more than your OS purchase.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc785914(WS.10).aspx

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    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    but I have some reading material for now....

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    because of broken or long links....

    be-bopping between the different links, to get a feel for what is what... ya know?

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    they can recover their own deleted files


    Oops, I should have read Shasca's post first

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    Is that a large footprint on my forehead?

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    then I edited it. No harm -- no footprint, just me bein a tard momentarily (I caught it in the next link I clicked).

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    Is this yet another example of you sucking info out of my brain for your own evil purposes.

    Why yes, yes it is

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    as I have never heard of volume shadow copy before opening this thread :0

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    but never knew exactly what it was or what it did.

    As shadows are the absence of light, and devoid of mass, how can they have volume? :0

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    That to be a mere Shadow of a real observation, and or question.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    Yeah, go with that....

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    but I will not admit to more than momentarily!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    Hit up these guys to see if they can help you too.

    http://www.commvault.com/solutions-small-mid-enterprise-resource-center.html

    We have a lefthand solution that has had multiple hardware failures. They replaced the whole unit, and told us to hold on to the old. We now have a better storage system on our test environment than most companys have as their primary. They have greatly improved the product line.

    http://www.compaq.com/storage/software/clusteredfs/index.html

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    not exactly what you want (different target) but there may be some useful info in there.

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    Haven't really seen a definitive set of specifications on your needs for disaster recovery and data backup JD. Think if you have a definitive set of specs, getting the right hardware or software solutions would be easier.

    Never liked NAS. They have their own software. Just another set of software and licensing to track and maintain. If I was going for network storage, I'd just get a Windows or a Linux box, stuff it with hard drives and use that.

    If the current tape system doesn't have the capacity you need but tape meets the specs, I'd go with large capacity tape system. In todays business environment, I'm sure you can get great pricing.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    how do I get disaster recovery for two servers that have a lot of configuration but do not store data? Can't buy a tape drive for each of them, which is why in the second question I was toying with the idea of getting a disk image of them.

    This is such a pain, and is keeping me from doing "real" work.... ;\

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    1: Disaster recovery for 2 servers
    a. servers have complex configurations that are not easily recreated
    b. servers need to be restored to current configuration with minimal effort.
    c. existing backup equipment does not have sufficent capacity to backup servers.

    Would upgrading existing equipment to larger capacity work?

    Backup software can, given sufficent hardware capacity, backup the entire servers including system state.

    I believe everyone here has given different methods to achieve the goal.

    All methods being equal, then price would be a deciding factor.

    Since one online storage company said they would provide the service for $1,800.00 per year, is there a lower cost method? In house only has the capital outlay without the $1,800.00 recurring costs [see Dell tape costs below].

    Acronis True Image Echo for Windows Server 2 licenses is $1,700.00 and doesn't include hardware.

    If you bought a couple of 1 TB external SATA hard drives for backup, probably cost you around $150.00 each [USB].

    They are portable.

    Going with upgrading the existing tape backup system probably would be a viable solution . The Dell LTO 1.5 TB tape solution runs about $1,700.00 without tapes. This is for 1 to 2 servers with no more than 1.5 TB of data. SCSI interface. Tapes 5 pack are around $350.00 each. Individual tape cost is $70.00 Doesn't include software to backup the data.

    Thats Dell. Typically, HP will be more expensive.

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    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    downloaded the trial of Acronis home to play with at home.

    I can see that being a good solution for the NON-tape systems, combined with a few USB drives.

    Thanks, will keep everyone posted.

    jd

    +
    0 Votes
    balge

    hi
    I was just wondering, surely you only need one licence for the server version, you only need to install on one machine as it can backup the other machines on the network as well as itself?
    this is a bit above my paygrade but I had a good look at the information on their website and couldn't work it out...
    also as far as I can tell you can store copies of the images anywhere on the net so you could add 'off-site backup' to your disaster recovery strategy if you had storage space elsewhere?
    cheers!

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    http://tinyurl.com/USB-enclosure

    This option is more for the other servers that are currently not being backed up at all. Thinking get a few of these, one for each server.

    Currently looking hard at the Acronis True Image software to backup to the external drives.

    For the main SQL server, I am thinking upgrading the tape drive will be my best option for the lowest cost, since fast recovery of a single file here or there is not a concern of mine.

    Thoughts people?

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    Long as you and Management are confortable with your backup scheme, and disaster recovery plan who are we to judge..........


    Looks like a good and simple to manage plan, that can be implemented at low cost. Go for it.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    more looking for people who have been there, done that and what their experience has taught them.

    Trying to find a solution that I will be able to get approved. Right now, if we had a fire, we would be in big trouble. :0

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    I was saying that you need to be comfortable with your solution. If you make decisions based solely on $ amounts but don't feel it is adequate. It isn't really a solution.

    I did continue and state that I thought with what you've got, and what you need it seemed like a good simple setup that would be easy to management.I just don't anything about how easy Ancronis is to manage. Thats the part I can't comment on. Backup software always seems to make a simple process more complicated than it needs to be. Arcserve seemed to get worse every time a patch or upgrade came out. Thus we are moving away from it to Commvault.

    Do enable Volume Shadow Copy also. When you can walk to someone's desktop have them right click a folder and copies of their data is right there at hand. You look like the hero of the day. Excellent for performance appraisals time too.

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    though!

    I recently got a freeagent 1.5 TB drive (seagate), and it worked fine for about a month -- then it started acting up. It does have a 5 yr warranty, so it shouldnt be an issue except for the data on it.
    Looking online, this is not uncommon for this unit either :0

    I have good luck with a caddy and other drives though.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    what caddy/drive combination have you used with favorable results?

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    Disliked their software.

    USB can take an god awful amount of time to copy stuff.

    JD, want some customer imput on external enclosures? try newegg.com and read through the customer reviews. now temper some of what the reviews say with the knowledge that some of them aren't all that savy at setup so they encounter problems and think it's the equipment, not them. Overall, though, the reviews are very informative.

    here's an example:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16817332011

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182144

    That's how I know it can take an awful amount of time to move stuff over USB 2.0.

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    over the USB drive, + it is mirrored, and uses a browser interface rather than installing SW on my system to connect it up.
    Personal preference.
    I have 2 hitachi 1TB drives in it currently, although there are issues with it (after connecting, the unit needs rebooting a second time to find them).
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822155003

    As for drives, I usually like seagate, but more recent ones seem to have a higher failure rate. I like hitachi as well.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    so you can get a rotation, how many of these enclosures do you use?

    How far back does it allow you to go on your current strategy?

    What do you do for year end or anything like that? Retire a drive from the enclosure?

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    I dont. I have the data on a USB drive backed up every month (about, or when I have time/remember)and unplugged, put in the other room.
    The main backups are on the mirrored NAS unit.

    +
    0 Votes
    shasca

    I'm in the process of returning an I/O Magic 500G external drive. Lasted 3 mos. It isn't going well. I've been waiting for an RMA for almost a month now. So check them off the list too. **** we ordered through our Dell rep. WTH>>>>>>>>>

    +
    0 Votes
    The Scummy One

    I prefer ones that I add my own HDD to. Just about everytime I get my hands on one that comes with a drive, the drive fails within a year.
    The problem is I usually just use adapters, not enclosures, and they leave the drive pretty exposed.

    A good USB enclosure should have an on/off switch and fans. The ones without fans allow heat to be trapped inside.

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    shasca

    You know anything about I/O Magic? I'm thinking the company is getting ready to "take a powder". They confirmed with my initial inquiry that the drive was under warrantee, and to fax in info for an RMA. Sitting here tapping toes and humming for a month now waiting for the return auth. Warrantee # went straight to voicemail, and they didn't call back. Guess it's what I get for trying to help the procurement guy. Shoulda left it to the expert.

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    The Scummy One

    I have heard of them, just no exp. with them.

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    OH Smeg

    That the drive is in. Many of these Big Drives are in Crap Enclosures that allow the Drives to Overheat when they are left running.

    For the Bigger 750 Gig + Drives they really need to be a a Actively Cooled Case with a Dedicated Power Supply anything less is just a recipe for disaster.

    I use a lot of the Antec MX1 Cases as they have both ESATA and USB interfaces and I've yet to have a problem with any drive in one of those. But to be fair I do use the higher G Rated Drives just in case.

    Col

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    jdclyde

    Ok, going and looking at hard drives, but I do not see a rating, let along a G rating?

    What is it, why do I want it, how do I find it?

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    OH Smeg

    Some of these are rated to a 50 G Impact. That are the ones that I use in External Enclosures while the Desktop computers get the cheaper 30 G Gravity rated drives in them.

    This is a measure of the force that can be applied to them in the Parked Nonruning condition without causing the heads to move from the parked positions, not the force that can be applied when they are running.

    I found that in the HDD Description at the makers Web Site when looking at which HDD is the best for which particular need. I'm not sure if it is listed on the actual Drives though.

    Cheers

    Col

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    The Scummy One

    now I wont have to freak out when I grab a HDD and take it on a bike trip with 20G cornering :^0

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    OH Smeg

    Are rated to a 30 G impact and not do any damage supposedly. :0

    But for those that I know are going to be moved around I prefer to use Drives with a Higher G Rating just to be on the safe side. I just don't trust the Users that I have all that much.

    But can I have the Police Photos that will be presented to the Coroner of you riding a bike that generates 20 G Cornering Loads? I would be great to show What Not To Do. :^0

    Col

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    Erik

    Where I am at I have a total of three servers. My DB server and Fax/AV Server backup to the main Win2k3 machine. On the Win2k3 machine I added an eSATA card and use a HD toaster. All information on the network is backed up in full each night to a 1TB drive in the toaster using the standard Win Backup program. Using two 1TB drives allows me to take the copy from the night before home with me and my lappy.

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    CG IT

    I've used some of the enclosures and they did heat up the hard drive considerably.

    I like the external enclosures to have some ventilation or a small fan for cooling.

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    NotSoChiGuy

    What I had setup once was a tape drive (SDLT 320, 1/8 autoloader, as I recall) attached to a HP NAS server.

    The overnight jobs would run to the NAS, and then during the day, I'd run a tape backup of the disk(s) to ship off site.

    This afforded us the protection of offsite storage, with the expedience of onsite data for restorations (especially helpful with DBs that get nightly refreshes). It also helped reduce failed backup jobs due to a bad tape or some other error.

    The cost was higher up front. However, it reduced the number of tapes we would have had to use, as well as the calls to retrieve tapes in order to perform a restore (those were $75 a pop from Iron Mountain, if I recall correctly).