Questions

Bandwidth management QoS

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Bandwidth management QoS

jaxisa
I am looking for something to provide bandwidth management for our 15 sites connected to our head office. All satelaite sites are 1.5/256DSL and the head office is 5mb/5mb. The only application runnning on our network that is of business importance and suceptable to latency is Terminal Server Client (RDP3389). I have been using a trial packeteer with great success, but to purchase a Packet Shaper appliance with a licence to support 10mb pipe is prohibative.

Have you heard of Net Equalizer product?
http://www.netequalizer.com/

Are there other products that can give me QoS without the high start up and maintenance costs?

What can you suggest to give QoS (compression not required) of 3389 traffic class? Will Cisco router QoS work - I thought you could only deddicate kb per session and it is not dynamic?

Thank you, James.
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    apotheon

    The ALTQ framework is the standard QoS packet prioritization toolset for BSD Unix systems. The FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD base systems include ALTQ, and it is in fact integrated with pf (the OpenBSD project's firewall, which is also available for NetBSD and FreeBSD).

    Here's information from the FreeBSD Handbook on use of ALTQ with pf:

    28.4 The OpenBSD Packet Filter (PF) and ALTQ

    That's the best QoS packet prioritization system I've dealt with -- better than the couple of proprietary/commercial systems I've seen (Cisco, et cetera). It should provide comprehensive coverage for QoS management, including granular control of protocols like Microsoft's RDP.

    Since FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD are all free/libre/open source software OSes, there are no licensing costs involved. They also tend to be fairly efficient systems with regard to resource usage, and under high network loads FreeBSD tends to benchmark better than Linux systems (to say nothing MS Windows, which benchmarks somewhere south of crappy under high network loads).

    edit: Depending on your needs, you may want to look into m0n0wall. It's a tiny little slimmed-down FreeBSD based dedicated router/firewall OS with one-click QoS configuration. Dead simple. Also not suitable for some firewalling purposes. You'll have to figure out for yourself if it suits your needs. Meanwhile, pfSense is a more feature-rich dedicated router/firewall OS that uses ALTQ for QoS management, and would probably scale upward with larger organizations better than m0n0wall. In comparative reviews, pfSense and m0n0wall have a tendency to beat all comers within their respective niches -- they're both excellent dedicated router/firewall OSes, and one could do much worse than to choose whichever of those two best suits your needs.

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    apotheon

    I've posted a new article about pf and ALTQ for QoS management in TechRepublic's IT Security weblog. You might want to check that out for more details.

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    blogtech1000

    We've been using Netequalizer (http://www.netequalizer.com) for a while now and it's been a good investment. Someone on this board recommended it and we've been happy. Compared with some other choices, the start up cost is really minimal and it's an easy set up. We just set it up and let it run. No problems so far.

  • +
    0 Votes
    apotheon

    The ALTQ framework is the standard QoS packet prioritization toolset for BSD Unix systems. The FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD base systems include ALTQ, and it is in fact integrated with pf (the OpenBSD project's firewall, which is also available for NetBSD and FreeBSD).

    Here's information from the FreeBSD Handbook on use of ALTQ with pf:

    28.4 The OpenBSD Packet Filter (PF) and ALTQ

    That's the best QoS packet prioritization system I've dealt with -- better than the couple of proprietary/commercial systems I've seen (Cisco, et cetera). It should provide comprehensive coverage for QoS management, including granular control of protocols like Microsoft's RDP.

    Since FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD are all free/libre/open source software OSes, there are no licensing costs involved. They also tend to be fairly efficient systems with regard to resource usage, and under high network loads FreeBSD tends to benchmark better than Linux systems (to say nothing MS Windows, which benchmarks somewhere south of crappy under high network loads).

    edit: Depending on your needs, you may want to look into m0n0wall. It's a tiny little slimmed-down FreeBSD based dedicated router/firewall OS with one-click QoS configuration. Dead simple. Also not suitable for some firewalling purposes. You'll have to figure out for yourself if it suits your needs. Meanwhile, pfSense is a more feature-rich dedicated router/firewall OS that uses ALTQ for QoS management, and would probably scale upward with larger organizations better than m0n0wall. In comparative reviews, pfSense and m0n0wall have a tendency to beat all comers within their respective niches -- they're both excellent dedicated router/firewall OSes, and one could do much worse than to choose whichever of those two best suits your needs.

    +
    0 Votes
    apotheon

    I've posted a new article about pf and ALTQ for QoS management in TechRepublic's IT Security weblog. You might want to check that out for more details.

    +
    0 Votes
    blogtech1000

    We've been using Netequalizer (http://www.netequalizer.com) for a while now and it's been a good investment. Someone on this board recommended it and we've been happy. Compared with some other choices, the start up cost is really minimal and it's an easy set up. We just set it up and let it run. No problems so far.