Questions

Best Begginer Jobs in IT

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Best Begginer Jobs in IT

HeyUTechGuy
Hello everyone, recently i have graduated from college with an associates degree in what my school called NCIS (Network Communication & Information Systems).

I have been job searching for a position where i can be hands on such as a pc technician which im really familiar with or some type of networking job which i only know the basics of. All i really see available to me is help desk (not something i want to do for a career) & Im going to follow up with an app i put to geek squad. But most of the positions where i would like to be in require years of experience (of course). I just want to be physically active and as hands on as possible, i just need a chance to show employers what i can do you know.

Does anyone know of the type of companies/places i should look for an entry level job that is hands on where i could learn and build a resume? I've had no luck finding any. I live in Cincinnati OH if that helps any.

Thank you so much for advice.
  • +
    0 Votes
    santeewelding

    That "help", as in, "desk" -- helping those who know not, as you do, and for which you would presumably be retained -- is not in the cards?

    I would have no use for you.

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    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    'nuff said.
    You need the attitude to get employers to ley you show your aptitude....

    There are plenty about with both, and you'll lose to them every time, no matter how brilliant you are with hardware.

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    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Take it, I started in support so did many others. It's crap job, but you will learn some practical IT, more to the point you'll learn about working with and for people and what IT is for.

    You reek of a "The world owes me living" attitude, not many people have any time for that. Employers don't have any at all.

    My first IT task was seperating print outs and delivering them to management, a year later I was coding on the mainframe to produce them. I said I could deliver reports, I was right, that and my general attitude built up a bit of trust.

    There's a lot more to working in IT than being able to tell a SATA drive from an IDE, or when to use a for or a while loop.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Take what Tony posted above to heart. I to started out in the IT world as a "runner/grunt" for lack of better words. Actually the first company I started to work with, I did very little IT work and for the most part helped the boss many rebuild some of his apartments (anything from wiring to painting or wood working). Soon after we had finished the fourth or fifth apartment, he placed me in the field full time. It took rebuilding the apartments to show him that I was punctual, had an attention for detail, and understood the tasks of what was laid out infront of me (ie, lay the tile floor, he laid the first row just to show the pattern, I laid the rest of it without question). We all had to start somewhere, and after about 8 years, I have changed companies and now am an assistant director of IT at a major company dealing directly with the gvt. So, basically as Tony said, and I am saying, you have to start somewhere, he started by running papers and what not to management, I started by laying tile and running electrical wire through walls.

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    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    RS232, doing drawings and labeling up the computer room.

    Then thicknet, thinnet, UTP, hubs, switches, bridges, routers, TCP/IP, network admin, topolgies, protocols, not bad for a programmer....

    Client server development is what I do, network topology can have a huge impact on well my solutions perform, being familiar with the issues, stops me getting it badly wrong the first time.


    Learning stuff is never wasted.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    The last line you wrote is exactly right, no matter what, always learn...

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    say in some kind (any kind) of IT field?

    If not more fool you - you now need to start at the bottom.

    I would think you now feel a bit sick with the realisation that you could have given yourself a head start. Not to worry however, in a couple of years you can get going for real. :-)

    +
    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont want to give impression that im owed anything because of a mere associates degree, its just that I know i would do a very good job and learn alot quickly in a hands on position. But i will say, since i completed associates i thought i could atleast get in some place where i could do some physical work, im not looking to make big money or anything like that, just want to learn and enjoy the type of work i do. Ultimately i want to do cisco routing when im in my 30s+ (Im 20 now) and just want to make sure im doing the best i can do each step in my career to reach my goal.

    I do understand that everyone has to start somewhere so i am applying for some help desk positions and what ever else i can handle.I figure if i cant move up from help desk it will at least give me some IT experience helping others on my resume.

    And no g-man, my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work which was really unfortunate because i think we should all have that opportunity to put our learning to practical use on the job.

    You guys have been really helpful. I truly appreciate your responses.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    those world owes me a living types about, some of them have PhDs never mind 'lowly' associates. I haven't got any degree at all!

    You sounded like one, which as we pointed out is a bad move.

    Times have been hard for a while in IT, in the US with H1Bs I understand it's a f'ing nightmare.

    My start right at the bottom of the ladder (my first job was data entry on nights !) taught me that you take every opportunity you can get and wring the life out of it to get yourself a good chance at the next.

    You certainly won't get f'all sat around waiting for an employer to recognise your obvious talent, in or out of work.

    Glad to help.
    We'd rather have someone like you in the job than some glib numpty with the right hair style who can't tell which way up a D plug should go.

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    You have to go and find the work yourself outside class all on your own (gasp). Not everything is handed to you on a plate - thinking ahead is the game!
    '
    That's the problem - you just sat back and said my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work, oh well I will not bother.

    +
    0 Votes
    santeewelding

    Pointing out the obvious, like that.

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    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont understand why you assume these negative and lazy things when you dont know me or half of what my college experience was. They made promises throughout my time in school, some they did do and some they didnt, intern/externs unfortunately was one of the ones they promised and didnt. All the other majors had their internships setup so i figured they would have interns for their IT students.

    All i can do is do the best i can for the present, no point in crying over spilled milk. So if you have nothing helpful to contribute, really dont bother, insults get no one anywhere.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    No problem, what tony said is right but to add to the last line of it, if you don't mind getting dirty, climbing through cealings, and who knows what else, then you should be able to move up quickly because you then show the management that you are willing to do what it takes to get the job done, done correctly, done on time, and done safely.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    If working safe makes it takes longer, they'd rather you didn't, as long of course as you don't hurt yourself, or a safety auditor turns up, or they are looking for an excuse....

    Ask for the procedure make sure you follow it no matter what. If there is one and you don't they'll use it against you.

    Broken bones and the sack!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    jhouseholder

    HeyUTechGuy...still around? I would be curious in knowing what you are doing these days. I am a Technical Recruiting Manager and we have an office in Cincinnati.

    +
    0 Votes
    jem94518

    Remember Grasshopper...wax on...wax off...wax on...wax off...we've all been there!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Take it, I started in support so did many others. It's crap job, but you will learn some practical IT, more to the point you'll learn about working with and for people and what IT is for.

    You reek of a "The world owes me living" attitude, not many people have any time for that. Employers don't have any at all.

    My first IT task was seperating print outs and delivering them to management, a year later I was coding on the mainframe to produce them. I said I could deliver reports, I was right, that and my general attitude built up a bit of trust.

    There's a lot more to working in IT than being able to tell a SATA drive from an IDE, or when to use a for or a while loop.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Take what Tony posted above to heart. I to started out in the IT world as a "runner/grunt" for lack of better words. Actually the first company I started to work with, I did very little IT work and for the most part helped the boss many rebuild some of his apartments (anything from wiring to painting or wood working). Soon after we had finished the fourth or fifth apartment, he placed me in the field full time. It took rebuilding the apartments to show him that I was punctual, had an attention for detail, and understood the tasks of what was laid out infront of me (ie, lay the tile floor, he laid the first row just to show the pattern, I laid the rest of it without question). We all had to start somewhere, and after about 8 years, I have changed companies and now am an assistant director of IT at a major company dealing directly with the gvt. So, basically as Tony said, and I am saying, you have to start somewhere, he started by running papers and what not to management, I started by laying tile and running electrical wire through walls.

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    say in some kind (any kind) of IT field?

    If not more fool you - you now need to start at the bottom.

    I would think you now feel a bit sick with the realisation that you could have given yourself a head start. Not to worry however, in a couple of years you can get going for real. :-)

    +
    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont want to give impression that im owed anything because of a mere associates degree, its just that I know i would do a very good job and learn alot quickly in a hands on position. But i will say, since i completed associates i thought i could atleast get in some place where i could do some physical work, im not looking to make big money or anything like that, just want to learn and enjoy the type of work i do. Ultimately i want to do cisco routing when im in my 30s+ (Im 20 now) and just want to make sure im doing the best i can do each step in my career to reach my goal.

    I do understand that everyone has to start somewhere so i am applying for some help desk positions and what ever else i can handle.I figure if i cant move up from help desk it will at least give me some IT experience helping others on my resume.

    And no g-man, my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work which was really unfortunate because i think we should all have that opportunity to put our learning to practical use on the job.

    You guys have been really helpful. I truly appreciate your responses.

    +
    0 Votes
    jhouseholder

    HeyUTechGuy...still around? I would be curious in knowing what you are doing these days. I am a Technical Recruiting Manager and we have an office in Cincinnati.

    +
    0 Votes
    jem94518

    Remember Grasshopper...wax on...wax off...wax on...wax off...we've all been there!!!

  • +
    0 Votes
    santeewelding

    That "help", as in, "desk" -- helping those who know not, as you do, and for which you would presumably be retained -- is not in the cards?

    I would have no use for you.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    'nuff said.
    You need the attitude to get employers to ley you show your aptitude....

    There are plenty about with both, and you'll lose to them every time, no matter how brilliant you are with hardware.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Take it, I started in support so did many others. It's crap job, but you will learn some practical IT, more to the point you'll learn about working with and for people and what IT is for.

    You reek of a "The world owes me living" attitude, not many people have any time for that. Employers don't have any at all.

    My first IT task was seperating print outs and delivering them to management, a year later I was coding on the mainframe to produce them. I said I could deliver reports, I was right, that and my general attitude built up a bit of trust.

    There's a lot more to working in IT than being able to tell a SATA drive from an IDE, or when to use a for or a while loop.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Take what Tony posted above to heart. I to started out in the IT world as a "runner/grunt" for lack of better words. Actually the first company I started to work with, I did very little IT work and for the most part helped the boss many rebuild some of his apartments (anything from wiring to painting or wood working). Soon after we had finished the fourth or fifth apartment, he placed me in the field full time. It took rebuilding the apartments to show him that I was punctual, had an attention for detail, and understood the tasks of what was laid out infront of me (ie, lay the tile floor, he laid the first row just to show the pattern, I laid the rest of it without question). We all had to start somewhere, and after about 8 years, I have changed companies and now am an assistant director of IT at a major company dealing directly with the gvt. So, basically as Tony said, and I am saying, you have to start somewhere, he started by running papers and what not to management, I started by laying tile and running electrical wire through walls.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    RS232, doing drawings and labeling up the computer room.

    Then thicknet, thinnet, UTP, hubs, switches, bridges, routers, TCP/IP, network admin, topolgies, protocols, not bad for a programmer....

    Client server development is what I do, network topology can have a huge impact on well my solutions perform, being familiar with the issues, stops me getting it badly wrong the first time.


    Learning stuff is never wasted.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    The last line you wrote is exactly right, no matter what, always learn...

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    say in some kind (any kind) of IT field?

    If not more fool you - you now need to start at the bottom.

    I would think you now feel a bit sick with the realisation that you could have given yourself a head start. Not to worry however, in a couple of years you can get going for real. :-)

    +
    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont want to give impression that im owed anything because of a mere associates degree, its just that I know i would do a very good job and learn alot quickly in a hands on position. But i will say, since i completed associates i thought i could atleast get in some place where i could do some physical work, im not looking to make big money or anything like that, just want to learn and enjoy the type of work i do. Ultimately i want to do cisco routing when im in my 30s+ (Im 20 now) and just want to make sure im doing the best i can do each step in my career to reach my goal.

    I do understand that everyone has to start somewhere so i am applying for some help desk positions and what ever else i can handle.I figure if i cant move up from help desk it will at least give me some IT experience helping others on my resume.

    And no g-man, my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work which was really unfortunate because i think we should all have that opportunity to put our learning to practical use on the job.

    You guys have been really helpful. I truly appreciate your responses.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    those world owes me a living types about, some of them have PhDs never mind 'lowly' associates. I haven't got any degree at all!

    You sounded like one, which as we pointed out is a bad move.

    Times have been hard for a while in IT, in the US with H1Bs I understand it's a f'ing nightmare.

    My start right at the bottom of the ladder (my first job was data entry on nights !) taught me that you take every opportunity you can get and wring the life out of it to get yourself a good chance at the next.

    You certainly won't get f'all sat around waiting for an employer to recognise your obvious talent, in or out of work.

    Glad to help.
    We'd rather have someone like you in the job than some glib numpty with the right hair style who can't tell which way up a D plug should go.

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    You have to go and find the work yourself outside class all on your own (gasp). Not everything is handed to you on a plate - thinking ahead is the game!
    '
    That's the problem - you just sat back and said my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work, oh well I will not bother.

    +
    0 Votes
    santeewelding

    Pointing out the obvious, like that.

    +
    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont understand why you assume these negative and lazy things when you dont know me or half of what my college experience was. They made promises throughout my time in school, some they did do and some they didnt, intern/externs unfortunately was one of the ones they promised and didnt. All the other majors had their internships setup so i figured they would have interns for their IT students.

    All i can do is do the best i can for the present, no point in crying over spilled milk. So if you have nothing helpful to contribute, really dont bother, insults get no one anywhere.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    No problem, what tony said is right but to add to the last line of it, if you don't mind getting dirty, climbing through cealings, and who knows what else, then you should be able to move up quickly because you then show the management that you are willing to do what it takes to get the job done, done correctly, done on time, and done safely.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    If working safe makes it takes longer, they'd rather you didn't, as long of course as you don't hurt yourself, or a safety auditor turns up, or they are looking for an excuse....

    Ask for the procedure make sure you follow it no matter what. If there is one and you don't they'll use it against you.

    Broken bones and the sack!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    jhouseholder

    HeyUTechGuy...still around? I would be curious in knowing what you are doing these days. I am a Technical Recruiting Manager and we have an office in Cincinnati.

    +
    0 Votes
    jem94518

    Remember Grasshopper...wax on...wax off...wax on...wax off...we've all been there!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Take it, I started in support so did many others. It's crap job, but you will learn some practical IT, more to the point you'll learn about working with and for people and what IT is for.

    You reek of a "The world owes me living" attitude, not many people have any time for that. Employers don't have any at all.

    My first IT task was seperating print outs and delivering them to management, a year later I was coding on the mainframe to produce them. I said I could deliver reports, I was right, that and my general attitude built up a bit of trust.

    There's a lot more to working in IT than being able to tell a SATA drive from an IDE, or when to use a for or a while loop.

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Take what Tony posted above to heart. I to started out in the IT world as a "runner/grunt" for lack of better words. Actually the first company I started to work with, I did very little IT work and for the most part helped the boss many rebuild some of his apartments (anything from wiring to painting or wood working). Soon after we had finished the fourth or fifth apartment, he placed me in the field full time. It took rebuilding the apartments to show him that I was punctual, had an attention for detail, and understood the tasks of what was laid out infront of me (ie, lay the tile floor, he laid the first row just to show the pattern, I laid the rest of it without question). We all had to start somewhere, and after about 8 years, I have changed companies and now am an assistant director of IT at a major company dealing directly with the gvt. So, basically as Tony said, and I am saying, you have to start somewhere, he started by running papers and what not to management, I started by laying tile and running electrical wire through walls.

    +
    0 Votes
    The 'G-Man.'

    say in some kind (any kind) of IT field?

    If not more fool you - you now need to start at the bottom.

    I would think you now feel a bit sick with the realisation that you could have given yourself a head start. Not to worry however, in a couple of years you can get going for real. :-)

    +
    0 Votes
    HeyUTechGuy

    I dont want to give impression that im owed anything because of a mere associates degree, its just that I know i would do a very good job and learn alot quickly in a hands on position. But i will say, since i completed associates i thought i could atleast get in some place where i could do some physical work, im not looking to make big money or anything like that, just want to learn and enjoy the type of work i do. Ultimately i want to do cisco routing when im in my 30s+ (Im 20 now) and just want to make sure im doing the best i can do each step in my career to reach my goal.

    I do understand that everyone has to start somewhere so i am applying for some help desk positions and what ever else i can handle.I figure if i cant move up from help desk it will at least give me some IT experience helping others on my resume.

    And no g-man, my school didnt offer any type of intern/extern type work which was really unfortunate because i think we should all have that opportunity to put our learning to practical use on the job.

    You guys have been really helpful. I truly appreciate your responses.

    +
    0 Votes
    jhouseholder

    HeyUTechGuy...still around? I would be curious in knowing what you are doing these days. I am a Technical Recruiting Manager and we have an office in Cincinnati.

    +
    0 Votes
    jem94518

    Remember Grasshopper...wax on...wax off...wax on...wax off...we've all been there!!!