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Business Center minimums

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Business Center minimums

chrislefrois
Hello,

I want to build a small business center with 1-3 domains and a web server and file server and print server and all with back up.

How many computers do I need and what functions should each systems role be.

I have 4- IBM e-server rack mount 3.0 dual xeon systems all with 2gig memory and 3-36GB storage each.

What are some configuration sugestions do you recommend?

What small aditional equipment do I need.
I have 4 licensed server 2003 software.

Thank you for your input.
  • +
    0 Votes
    Aaron Mason

    Hello,

    How many users will you have, and what sorts of tasks will they be required to undertake? Generally you should have one computer for each person who will actually need one for their day-to-day work, and a small number more for the occasional users.

    For your servers, I recommend the following:

    * Use one as a domain controller
    * Run Hyper-V or VMware ESXi on the next two (the latter is free, the former has a console-based free version which demands virtualisation extensions) to provide virtual servers for the other functions as well as a backup DC or two (on separate hypervisors, of course)
    * For the fourth, set up DFS replication on it, your DC and your virtual Windows servers. Have the servers replicate to it constantly and perform a nightly backup to tape. Alternatively, you can mount file shares from this fourth box on your servers, for inclusion in the nightly backup. Modern tapes can hold up to 800gb uncompressed.

    The advantage of virtualisation is that if you need a small app server for whatever reason, you can just build one in the virtual environment and it won't add as much to your carbon footprint as it would if you deployed a separate box. Also you can adjust each VM's resources to tailor your needs with minimal downtime (i.e. shut it down, adjust the settings, bring it back up - at most about 5-10 minutes).

    I'd recommend increasing the RAM in your ESXi servers to allow more room to grow.

  • +
    0 Votes
    Aaron Mason

    Hello,

    How many users will you have, and what sorts of tasks will they be required to undertake? Generally you should have one computer for each person who will actually need one for their day-to-day work, and a small number more for the occasional users.

    For your servers, I recommend the following:

    * Use one as a domain controller
    * Run Hyper-V or VMware ESXi on the next two (the latter is free, the former has a console-based free version which demands virtualisation extensions) to provide virtual servers for the other functions as well as a backup DC or two (on separate hypervisors, of course)
    * For the fourth, set up DFS replication on it, your DC and your virtual Windows servers. Have the servers replicate to it constantly and perform a nightly backup to tape. Alternatively, you can mount file shares from this fourth box on your servers, for inclusion in the nightly backup. Modern tapes can hold up to 800gb uncompressed.

    The advantage of virtualisation is that if you need a small app server for whatever reason, you can just build one in the virtual environment and it won't add as much to your carbon footprint as it would if you deployed a separate box. Also you can adjust each VM's resources to tailor your needs with minimal downtime (i.e. shut it down, adjust the settings, bring it back up - at most about 5-10 minutes).

    I'd recommend increasing the RAM in your ESXi servers to allow more room to grow.