Questions

Can a file be blocked from transfer on a public platform like Whatsapp?

Tags: Software, Networking, Community
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0 Votes

Can a file be blocked from transfer on a public platform like Whatsapp?

pilotsgyde
Okay, this is a strange issue in itself...

So recently, a scandalous video surfaced in my home country concerning one of our ministers of state. The video went viral, spreading specifically through Whatsapp.

Today, literally an entire nation awoke to find out that somehow it was no longer possible to transfer the video to another party via Whatsapp. Text went through. Images went through. Any other video went through. JUST NOT THAT SPECIFIC SCANDALOUS VIDEO.

How on earth is that possible? I'm not looking for ways around the system. It doesn't matter that we can't share the video any more (everybody has it anyway). But I was baffled that it was possible to block a specific file on a public app in an entire nation.

What am I missing? How is that technologically possible?

Thanks for reading.

Member Answers

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      0 Votes
      nanapee2

      Whenever you send a message, picture or video to any of your contacts besides a group on whatsapp, you'll notice that that there are 2 checks next to the message after it's delivered. The first check implies that your message was successfully delivered to Whatsapp server and the second implies your message has been succesfully delivered to your friend. YES! Every message you send to a friend passes through their server before it's rerouted to your friend. At the point your friend receives your message, their server automatically erases the log.

      Assuming you lost your phone or it got stolen, and had the International Mobile Equipment Identifier (IMEI) of your phone reported to your carrier, they would broadcast that number throughout their network and make it impossible for the phone to connect to make a call. This known as blacklisting a phone. This is quite similar to how whatsapp enacted their blockage. Since every message we share on whatsapp is enrouted to their server first, it's evident that an algorithm was developed to reject any incoming connection with specific data types of the blacklisted file. That's how come you wouldn't even expect a single checkmark next to your message. The server rejects your connection.

      Changing the file extension of the video as well as renaming it solves no problem. The computer would still identify certain unique properties your outgoing video still contains. I first thought about metadata (Details on video description, audio description, media description, origin, content and file).

      To locate this: Right-click on the video file. Choose Properties and Select Details

      These are the general markup of a file's metadata. Clearing the values of the metadata still solved no problem. There are default descriptions inside the metadata that needs to be rewritten without altering the content of the video. Once these values have been altered using a video converter, the server would render your outgoing file as a new file and grant it permission to be rerouted.

      Follow this link to read the full article: http://tinyurl.com/kyzjq5h

      +
      0 Votes
      nanapee2

      Whenever you send a message, picture or video to any of your contacts besides a group on whatsapp, you'll notice that that there are 2 checks next to the message after it's delivered. The first check implies that your message was successfully delivered to Whatsapp server and the second implies your message has been succesfully delivered to your friend. YES! Every message you send to a friend passes through their server before it's rerouted to your friend. At the point your friend receives your message, their server automatically erases the log.

      Assuming you lost your phone or it got stolen, and had the International Mobile Equipment Identifier (IMEI) of your phone reported to your carrier, they would broadcast that number throughout their network and make it impossible for the phone to connect to make a call. This known as blacklisting a phone. This is quite similar to how whatsapp enacted their blockage. Since every message we share on whatsapp is enrouted to their server first, it's evident that an algorithm was developed to reject any incoming connection with specific data types of the blacklisted file. That's how come you wouldn't even expect a single checkmark next to your message. The server rejects your connection.

      Changing the file extension of the video as well as renaming it solves no problem. The computer would still identify certain unique properties your outgoing video still contains. I first thought about metadata (Details on video description, audio description, media description, origin, content and file).

      To locate this: Right-click on the video file. Choose Properties and Select Details

      These are the general markup of a file's metadata. Clearing the values of the metadata still solved no problem. There are default descriptions inside the metadata that needs to be rewritten without altering the content of the video. Once these values have been altered using a video converter, the server would render your outgoing file as a new file and grant it permission to be rerouted.

      Follow this link to read the full article: http://tinyurl.com/kyzjq5h

    • +
      0 Votes
      nanapee2

      Whenever you send a message, picture or video to any of your contacts besides a group on whatsapp, you'll notice that that there are 2 checks next to the message after it's delivered. The first check implies that your message was successfully delivered to Whatsapp server and the second implies your message has been succesfully delivered to your friend. YES! Every message you send to a friend passes through their server before it's rerouted to your friend. At the point your friend receives your message, their server automatically erases the log.

      Assuming you lost your phone or it got stolen, and had the International Mobile Equipment Identifier (IMEI) of your phone reported to your carrier, they would broadcast that number throughout their network and make it impossible for the phone to connect to make a call. This known as blacklisting a phone. This is quite similar to how whatsapp enacted their blockage. Since every message we share on whatsapp is enrouted to their server first, it's evident that an algorithm was developed to reject any incoming connection with specific data types of the blacklisted file. That's how come you wouldn't even expect a single checkmark next to your message. The server rejects your connection.

      Changing the file extension of the video as well as renaming it solves no problem. The computer would still identify certain unique properties your outgoing video still contains. I first thought about metadata (Details on video description, audio description, media description, origin, content and file).

      To locate this: Right-click on the video file. Choose Properties and Select Details

      These are the general markup of a file's metadata. Clearing the values of the metadata still solved no problem. There are default descriptions inside the metadata that needs to be rewritten without altering the content of the video. Once these values have been altered using a video converter, the server would render your outgoing file as a new file and grant it permission to be rerouted.

      Follow this link to read the full article: http://tinyurl.com/kyzjq5h

      +
      0 Votes
      nanapee2

      Whenever you send a message, picture or video to any of your contacts besides a group on whatsapp, you'll notice that that there are 2 checks next to the message after it's delivered. The first check implies that your message was successfully delivered to Whatsapp server and the second implies your message has been succesfully delivered to your friend. YES! Every message you send to a friend passes through their server before it's rerouted to your friend. At the point your friend receives your message, their server automatically erases the log.

      Assuming you lost your phone or it got stolen, and had the International Mobile Equipment Identifier (IMEI) of your phone reported to your carrier, they would broadcast that number throughout their network and make it impossible for the phone to connect to make a call. This known as blacklisting a phone. This is quite similar to how whatsapp enacted their blockage. Since every message we share on whatsapp is enrouted to their server first, it's evident that an algorithm was developed to reject any incoming connection with specific data types of the blacklisted file. That's how come you wouldn't even expect a single checkmark next to your message. The server rejects your connection.

      Changing the file extension of the video as well as renaming it solves no problem. The computer would still identify certain unique properties your outgoing video still contains. I first thought about metadata (Details on video description, audio description, media description, origin, content and file).

      To locate this: Right-click on the video file. Choose Properties and Select Details

      These are the general markup of a file's metadata. Clearing the values of the metadata still solved no problem. There are default descriptions inside the metadata that needs to be rewritten without altering the content of the video. Once these values have been altered using a video converter, the server would render your outgoing file as a new file and grant it permission to be rerouted.

      Follow this link to read the full article: http://tinyurl.com/kyzjq5h