Questions

Can't record audio from front or back left/right audio channels - help :<

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Can't record audio from front or back left/right audio channels - help :<

Falconeer
I have a HP Media Center w/Realtec sound card.

Running XP Pro SP2

I'm also using Nero 6 Ultra version, both the Tape and Recording program. DirectX 9 and 'supposedly' the latest drivers from Realtec.

Everything I've tried has failed to provide line-in audio input to this program.

I've tried Mono, stereo, aux line-in2, line-in, the only thing that would work is going through the microphone port but that requires me to find a male to male connector for input and I don't know if the quality would suffer. The microphone works just fine at this juncture. Don't know if that will last, considering 'junking' Nero & the sound card.

Also when editing/saving movies using 'Make Movie' (then making a DVD output file) the resulting sound output on the DVD is decreased to the point where one can barely hear it. However if I export the file to say a MP3 format the sound does come out fine.

I'm going to try to remove the Realtec drivers and maybe it will reload the drivers, hoping it's a driver problem. I've tried this some weeks ago but it didn't work then and I have little hope that it will work now.

I surely hope you all can give me some of your wonderful advice.

Thanks in Advance.

Marcel-Falconeer
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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    I don't think you have specified it, but what sound source (ie where is it coming from) are you trying to record?

    What is the sound actually?

    Have you tried accessing your Audio Properties box, to make sure your input channels are NOT muted?

    There are various workarounds available to you but first we have to make sure you are receiving a sound signal.

    Post back.


    <Edited for typo>

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    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    One sound source is a cassette tape with a standard headphone to RCA 'banana' plugs, which of course plug into the 'red/white' audio input on the comuter. The other sound source is from a advanced record turnable with 2 channel audio output using the same cabling.

    Yes, I've checked all of the record/playback Microsoft Volume Control and the Multichannel Audio Configuration program that Realtek 97 provides.

    I know the playback works as I can record from the microphone and play back via Nero or Windows Media Player, etc.

    It's just the inputs from the line in that don't seem to work.

    Hope that helps explain the situation a little better.

    M

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    1. "a cassette tape with a standard headphone to RCA 'banana' plugs, which of course plug into the 'red/white' audio input on the computer"

    Here's where your leaving me behind - any computer I've ever used had a 3.5mm stereo input (in the case of both my tower and my laptop) so this idea of 'red/white' has to do with your soundcard I assume.

    Is there the possibility that you are connecting to auxiliary OUTPUTS rather than inputs? It may also be that the line signal from your source is insufficient to produce a recordable sound.

    Just over a year ago I recorded all my old cassettes to harddrive (very successfully) using a Sony Walkman and a stereo 3.5mm (male) to 3.5mm (male) trunk cable. Walkman headphone socket to Laptop mic/line in socket - that was all there was to it.

    I would advise that, since you are experiencing problems with your banana plug configuration, a standard 3.5mm to 3.5mm cable would be a suitable workaround although to many computer users THAT is the ONLY course of action open to them.

    There have been many recent posts on TR regarding whether or not a laptop microphone socket is capable of receiving a stereo signal and I am here to tell you that it is completely feasible since laptops don't have a separate line in socket.

    My unfamiliarity with your particular soundcard setup prevents me from taking you down a solution path using it, but be assured, your microphone socket will do equally well as a suitable receptor for recording from.

    See if you can find a RCA (twin female) to stereo 3.5mm (male) trunking cable. Here in the UK a ready made one costs about ?2.99.

    Good luck.


    <Edited for typo>

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    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    Well, I'm not stupid or blind - OR am I :)

    On the front panel are aux 'inputs' for USB 2.0, headphones, microphone, 1394, left & right audio, composite & S-Video. These all for user quick access.

    On the back they are duplicated plus a lot more, u know, analog & digital monitors, printers, more USB ports and, would you believe? Hidden behind the mass of cables that are present is a 'little old female input '3.5mm' that's labeled LINE IN.

    Viola, it works. It takes a male/male 3.5mm plug to complete the connection, plus I can use the front or back microphone input as you stated.

    Good work mate.

    AND THANKS AGAIN.

    Know anything about Nero Vision Express :)

    M

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Nero Vision Express:

    As installed on my home wired network? Yup, that must be it!

    My experiences with Nero Vision Express happen whenever I fire up Nero 7 Ultra Edition.

    Obvious question - what do you need to know?

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    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    It sure hasn't affected your brain.

    Talking about ancient . . . my father was a Free French B-26 bomber pilot. (Killed during WWII) So, I'm certainly going on ancient :<

    I'm running Ultra 6 and the compiled movie to DVD is doing some very strange things.

    For instance I can take an hour long movie (assembled from various videos) and the resulting DVD sound is almost nil after the compilation. However, if you 'export' it to a file the sound is just fine.

    If I copy a imported DVD from a folder or do a direct copy DVD to DVD the sound level works fine also.

    I was about to try Ultra 7 but they insist on me removing Version 6 which because of the problems I'm having with 6 I don't want to repeat with 7.

    I bought and downloaded 6 about 2 years ago and Nero had the audacity to say that to save space and download time the chm files weren't included.

    Yea, sure - to this day they still haven't offered all the help files in chm format.

    I've looked on forums, etc. for an answer to this problem with no luck.

    I suspect it may have to do with the smart encoding although I turn it off and it doesn't help.

    Nor can I find any 'settings' manual or otherwise to tell the program not to fool with the 'damn sound.

    Yikes,

    It's about to drive me crazier than I already am.

    I was going to invite you for a 'pint' the next time I go to Bordeaux to see my brother.

    But even landing in London or so still leaves me quite a piece from the 'highlands'.

    Why do they call them the highlands? Looking at the elevation (Google Earth) I don't see any highland :)

    Oh well. It's the thought that counted!

    Thanks in advance.

    Marcel

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    What file formats have you collected for your compilation?

    What file format does your compilation end up as?

    I know, I know, - they're daft questions but there's no point in me trying to recreate your problem if I don't know the file formats.

    As for why the Highlands are so called: probably because it's where all the Highlanders live!

    (I was born a 'lowlander' - just moved here for my twilight years)

    +
    0 Votes
    janitorman

    When using the "red/white" audio line inputs on the front of an HP media center (xp) computer, I found that in order to record from an auxiliary source (such as cassette deck or turntable) that I had to open a program such as Media Center or Green Button (third party) or Total Media Monitor (TMmonitor 3 from arcsoft)(this is a free download and works MUCH better for my purposes than the native green button media center ap) in order to hear the sounds from the speaker. I'm sure there are other programs that will do it but this always works.
    The problem is, the red/green/yellow inputs on the front of the HP are designed for TV or video input.. and in order to access them you need a TV/video monitoring program, and with the source selected as aux. 2. It will give you an error, no signal detected (picture) however you WILL have sound coming out of your speakers. Minimize the video/media center window, and open your recording software.
    It's very frustrating doing it this way, but VERY cheap (no additional software or hardware required.)
    Of course if you wanted to spend 100-200 there are now the "digital turntables" or even the automatic ones that are standalone or connect via usb and do most of the work for you.
    Also, I found a good "cheat sheet" on how to connect audio to record in XP from a vendor who has a program designed for this. You'll notice it tells you you MUST get sound out to your speakers first before anything else. In my case, I had to do it by connecting red/white inputs on the front and THEN OPENING TM monitor,which has an input selection button right on the screen when you are on TV mode. (The program that ships with XP media center edition makes it very hard to select input source without running setup each time.)
    Hope this helps all the audiophiles out there considering using this method.

    +
    0 Votes
    janitorman

    When using the "red/white" audio line inputs on the front of an HP media center (xp) computer, I found that in order to record from an auxiliary source (such as cassette deck or turntable) that I had to open a program such as Media Center or Green Button (third party) or Total Media Monitor (TMmonitor 3 from arcsoft)(this is a free download and works MUCH better for my purposes than the native green button media center ap) in order to hear the sounds from the speaker. I'm sure there are other programs that will do it but this always works.
    The problem is, the red/green/yellow inputs on the front of the HP are designed for TV or video input.. and in order to access them you need a TV/video monitoring program, and with the source selected as aux. 2. It will give you an error, no signal detected (picture) however you WILL have sound coming out of your speakers. Minimize the video/media center window, and open your recording software.
    It's very frustrating doing it this way, but VERY cheap (no additional software or hardware required.)
    Of course if you wanted to spend 100-200 there are now the "digital turntables" or even the automatic ones that are standalone or connect via usb and do most of the work for you.
    Also, I found a good "cheat sheet" on how to connect audio to record in XP from a vendor who has a program designed for this. You'll notice it tells you you MUST get sound out to your speakers first before anything else. In my case, I had to do it by connecting red/white inputs on the front and THEN OPENING TM monitor,which has an input selection button right on the screen when you are on TV mode. (The program that ships with XP media center edition makes it very hard to select input source without running setup each time.)
    Hope this helps all the audiophiles out there considering using this method.

  • +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    I don't think you have specified it, but what sound source (ie where is it coming from) are you trying to record?

    What is the sound actually?

    Have you tried accessing your Audio Properties box, to make sure your input channels are NOT muted?

    There are various workarounds available to you but first we have to make sure you are receiving a sound signal.

    Post back.


    <Edited for typo>

    +
    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    One sound source is a cassette tape with a standard headphone to RCA 'banana' plugs, which of course plug into the 'red/white' audio input on the comuter. The other sound source is from a advanced record turnable with 2 channel audio output using the same cabling.

    Yes, I've checked all of the record/playback Microsoft Volume Control and the Multichannel Audio Configuration program that Realtek 97 provides.

    I know the playback works as I can record from the microphone and play back via Nero or Windows Media Player, etc.

    It's just the inputs from the line in that don't seem to work.

    Hope that helps explain the situation a little better.

    M

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    1. "a cassette tape with a standard headphone to RCA 'banana' plugs, which of course plug into the 'red/white' audio input on the computer"

    Here's where your leaving me behind - any computer I've ever used had a 3.5mm stereo input (in the case of both my tower and my laptop) so this idea of 'red/white' has to do with your soundcard I assume.

    Is there the possibility that you are connecting to auxiliary OUTPUTS rather than inputs? It may also be that the line signal from your source is insufficient to produce a recordable sound.

    Just over a year ago I recorded all my old cassettes to harddrive (very successfully) using a Sony Walkman and a stereo 3.5mm (male) to 3.5mm (male) trunk cable. Walkman headphone socket to Laptop mic/line in socket - that was all there was to it.

    I would advise that, since you are experiencing problems with your banana plug configuration, a standard 3.5mm to 3.5mm cable would be a suitable workaround although to many computer users THAT is the ONLY course of action open to them.

    There have been many recent posts on TR regarding whether or not a laptop microphone socket is capable of receiving a stereo signal and I am here to tell you that it is completely feasible since laptops don't have a separate line in socket.

    My unfamiliarity with your particular soundcard setup prevents me from taking you down a solution path using it, but be assured, your microphone socket will do equally well as a suitable receptor for recording from.

    See if you can find a RCA (twin female) to stereo 3.5mm (male) trunking cable. Here in the UK a ready made one costs about ?2.99.

    Good luck.


    <Edited for typo>

    +
    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    Well, I'm not stupid or blind - OR am I :)

    On the front panel are aux 'inputs' for USB 2.0, headphones, microphone, 1394, left & right audio, composite & S-Video. These all for user quick access.

    On the back they are duplicated plus a lot more, u know, analog & digital monitors, printers, more USB ports and, would you believe? Hidden behind the mass of cables that are present is a 'little old female input '3.5mm' that's labeled LINE IN.

    Viola, it works. It takes a male/male 3.5mm plug to complete the connection, plus I can use the front or back microphone input as you stated.

    Good work mate.

    AND THANKS AGAIN.

    Know anything about Nero Vision Express :)

    M

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Nero Vision Express:

    As installed on my home wired network? Yup, that must be it!

    My experiences with Nero Vision Express happen whenever I fire up Nero 7 Ultra Edition.

    Obvious question - what do you need to know?

    +
    0 Votes
    Falconeer

    It sure hasn't affected your brain.

    Talking about ancient . . . my father was a Free French B-26 bomber pilot. (Killed during WWII) So, I'm certainly going on ancient :<

    I'm running Ultra 6 and the compiled movie to DVD is doing some very strange things.

    For instance I can take an hour long movie (assembled from various videos) and the resulting DVD sound is almost nil after the compilation. However, if you 'export' it to a file the sound is just fine.

    If I copy a imported DVD from a folder or do a direct copy DVD to DVD the sound level works fine also.

    I was about to try Ultra 7 but they insist on me removing Version 6 which because of the problems I'm having with 6 I don't want to repeat with 7.

    I bought and downloaded 6 about 2 years ago and Nero had the audacity to say that to save space and download time the chm files weren't included.

    Yea, sure - to this day they still haven't offered all the help files in chm format.

    I've looked on forums, etc. for an answer to this problem with no luck.

    I suspect it may have to do with the smart encoding although I turn it off and it doesn't help.

    Nor can I find any 'settings' manual or otherwise to tell the program not to fool with the 'damn sound.

    Yikes,

    It's about to drive me crazier than I already am.

    I was going to invite you for a 'pint' the next time I go to Bordeaux to see my brother.

    But even landing in London or so still leaves me quite a piece from the 'highlands'.

    Why do they call them the highlands? Looking at the elevation (Google Earth) I don't see any highland :)

    Oh well. It's the thought that counted!

    Thanks in advance.

    Marcel

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    What file formats have you collected for your compilation?

    What file format does your compilation end up as?

    I know, I know, - they're daft questions but there's no point in me trying to recreate your problem if I don't know the file formats.

    As for why the Highlands are so called: probably because it's where all the Highlanders live!

    (I was born a 'lowlander' - just moved here for my twilight years)

    +
    0 Votes
    janitorman

    When using the "red/white" audio line inputs on the front of an HP media center (xp) computer, I found that in order to record from an auxiliary source (such as cassette deck or turntable) that I had to open a program such as Media Center or Green Button (third party) or Total Media Monitor (TMmonitor 3 from arcsoft)(this is a free download and works MUCH better for my purposes than the native green button media center ap) in order to hear the sounds from the speaker. I'm sure there are other programs that will do it but this always works.
    The problem is, the red/green/yellow inputs on the front of the HP are designed for TV or video input.. and in order to access them you need a TV/video monitoring program, and with the source selected as aux. 2. It will give you an error, no signal detected (picture) however you WILL have sound coming out of your speakers. Minimize the video/media center window, and open your recording software.
    It's very frustrating doing it this way, but VERY cheap (no additional software or hardware required.)
    Of course if you wanted to spend 100-200 there are now the "digital turntables" or even the automatic ones that are standalone or connect via usb and do most of the work for you.
    Also, I found a good "cheat sheet" on how to connect audio to record in XP from a vendor who has a program designed for this. You'll notice it tells you you MUST get sound out to your speakers first before anything else. In my case, I had to do it by connecting red/white inputs on the front and THEN OPENING TM monitor,which has an input selection button right on the screen when you are on TV mode. (The program that ships with XP media center edition makes it very hard to select input source without running setup each time.)
    Hope this helps all the audiophiles out there considering using this method.

    +
    0 Votes
    janitorman

    When using the "red/white" audio line inputs on the front of an HP media center (xp) computer, I found that in order to record from an auxiliary source (such as cassette deck or turntable) that I had to open a program such as Media Center or Green Button (third party) or Total Media Monitor (TMmonitor 3 from arcsoft)(this is a free download and works MUCH better for my purposes than the native green button media center ap) in order to hear the sounds from the speaker. I'm sure there are other programs that will do it but this always works.
    The problem is, the red/green/yellow inputs on the front of the HP are designed for TV or video input.. and in order to access them you need a TV/video monitoring program, and with the source selected as aux. 2. It will give you an error, no signal detected (picture) however you WILL have sound coming out of your speakers. Minimize the video/media center window, and open your recording software.
    It's very frustrating doing it this way, but VERY cheap (no additional software or hardware required.)
    Of course if you wanted to spend 100-200 there are now the "digital turntables" or even the automatic ones that are standalone or connect via usb and do most of the work for you.
    Also, I found a good "cheat sheet" on how to connect audio to record in XP from a vendor who has a program designed for this. You'll notice it tells you you MUST get sound out to your speakers first before anything else. In my case, I had to do it by connecting red/white inputs on the front and THEN OPENING TM monitor,which has an input selection button right on the screen when you are on TV mode. (The program that ships with XP media center edition makes it very hard to select input source without running setup each time.)
    Hope this helps all the audiophiles out there considering using this method.