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Cat5 wiring parallel or series

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Cat5 wiring parallel or series

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I have two workstations. From telephone line master socket I run two 15 meter cat5 cables in the opposite directions. I assume broadband signals levels are divided between two locations. I have been told I could connect them in series to improve signal levels available. Is this true for both locations? Can I convert the existing installation by using a spare pair from one location to return to the master socket and then fed to the second socket?

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jqbecker

You cannot run Cat5 in series, will not work.

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    cmiller5400

    What are you trying to do?

    15 meter cables should be fine by themselves, cat5 is limited on length unless you have a switch/repeater/signal booster on it (about 300 feet under perfect conditions, with no EMI interference). If you have lots of RF or EMI interference, you should switch to STP or fiber.

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    Tatar

    I want to find out which is the better solution of connecting two points at opposing direction from the master socket.

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    robo_dev

    First of all, if you are talking about Ethernet, it either connects at a certain fixed speed or it does not.

    So if there is a 100 megabit fast ethernet port 100 meters from a PC, the cable in between only is required to be four standard 22 or 24 gauge wires, typically in a UTP (unshielded twisted pair) configuration. More wires, less resistance, or even a dramatically shorter cable run will have no effect on the speed and throughput...it will be a 100 megabit connection.

    If there is a situation like a lot of electrical interference, it may be necessary to use STP (shielded twisted pair), or the connection may only allow a connection at 10 mbs.

    Ethernet over CAT-5 is a star topology, thus series connection cannot be done.

    Parallel LAN connections (having two Ethernet adapters in the PC and two cables back to two ports in the Ethernet switch) does not buy you any performance.

    Using two connections such as this does not increase the throughput of a PC, as the PC can only use one interface at a time.

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    Bruce Epper

    Parallel LAN connections (generally referred to as link aggregation or trunking) is most definitely possible, it does increase the network throughput to the connected device and thus does buy one performance. The only real restrictions are that the devices at both ends (the PC or server and the switch it is conntected to) must both support 802.1AX and both links must operate at the same speed. It can also provide redundancy in the event of a failure of a port on the switch, a NIC in the PC or the cable between the two.

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    TheChas

    As you state from the "telephone line master socket" I presume that you are talking about a DSL or similar broadband signal.

    You say you are routing the broadband signal to two different computers.

    For this to work at all, you would need a broadband modem at each computer.

    I would install the modem with a router near the telephone jack and then run two separate Ethernet cables to the two computers. Problem solved. No signal level or negotiation issues. You only need one modem, and it all works properly for both computers.

    Chas

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    Charles Bundy

    An unpowered hub topology for two jacks using cat5e in parallel. While this isn't unworkable why not buy a powered switch/hub and get power/transmission benefits realized from using cat5e in the first place vs trying to run series. The signaling would be a nightmare with different timing introduced for the same signal.

    Try a 4 port powered switch with one rj45 going to the wall socket, second rj45 goes to workstation 1, third goes to workstation 2.

    Hope this helps!