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Certifications, how important are they to you?

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Certifications, how important are they to you?

ECMTech
How much value do you place on Certifications when reviewing candidates, especially non-IT certifications like Six Sigma?
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    robo_dev

    For some positions there is an expectation that everyone will have a certain certification, and others not so much.

    One 'trick' to consider is that computers read resumes, not people. So if you say that you are "preparing for the CISSP exam" on your resume, you are less likely to be automatically excluded, as the correct keyword appears on your resume. If a prospective employer really wants a particular cert, and you don't have it, it's perfectly OK to tell them you are preparing for the exam.

    As somebody who has lots of certifications, I understand that even a cave man could cram and sit for most certification exams and therefore end up with lots of letters after his or her name.

    At the end of the day the experience of the person is more important, obviously.

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    TechnologyCerts

    It validates a persons skills and sets them apart from other candidates. Certifications give you an edge that nothing else will, they should be considered an investment in your career and future.

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    Tony Hopkinson

    Given your alias, I'm thinking there's a wee bit of bias here.
    How does it make you stand out from other candidates, when they've all got it as well, because they wouldn't get past the first wordsearch without it.....

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    Tony Hopkinson

    The knowledge and practice you shouls have to be certified is always useful at some point, even if it's only a vague memory that there was something there, by the time you need it.
    As in, this person is a capable IT professional, met way too many who had the bit of paper who were a total waste of space, never mind all those that just claimed it.
    Good training mechanism for those who are interested in the learning as opposed to looking qualified, as a validation mechanism, iffy in almost all cases.

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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    For some positions there is an expectation that everyone will have a certain certification, and others not so much.

    One 'trick' to consider is that computers read resumes, not people. So if you say that you are "preparing for the CISSP exam" on your resume, you are less likely to be automatically excluded, as the correct keyword appears on your resume. If a prospective employer really wants a particular cert, and you don't have it, it's perfectly OK to tell them you are preparing for the exam.

    As somebody who has lots of certifications, I understand that even a cave man could cram and sit for most certification exams and therefore end up with lots of letters after his or her name.

    At the end of the day the experience of the person is more important, obviously.

    +
    0 Votes
    TechnologyCerts

    It validates a persons skills and sets them apart from other candidates. Certifications give you an edge that nothing else will, they should be considered an investment in your career and future.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    Given your alias, I'm thinking there's a wee bit of bias here.
    How does it make you stand out from other candidates, when they've all got it as well, because they wouldn't get past the first wordsearch without it.....

    +
    0 Votes
    Tony Hopkinson

    The knowledge and practice you shouls have to be certified is always useful at some point, even if it's only a vague memory that there was something there, by the time you need it.
    As in, this person is a capable IT professional, met way too many who had the bit of paper who were a total waste of space, never mind all those that just claimed it.
    Good training mechanism for those who are interested in the learning as opposed to looking qualified, as a validation mechanism, iffy in almost all cases.