Questions

Changing my main boot drive

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Changing my main boot drive

chrishov
Right now windows is setup with C:\ as my 160gb sata drive, I want to use the sata for games only and make my 2nd IDE hd my boot/data drive... I have data on the IDE that I wish to keep copied from my sata, but my sata can be wiped clean with no issues. What is the proper way to do this so that my sata shows as F:\ and my IDE as C:\ ? both are set as masters one in the sata channel and the other ide channel. Thank you for your time.
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    robo_dev

    backup everything to the SATA drive and make an extra copy of everything, cos you can never have too many backups.

    Disconnect the SATA drive, and do a fresh install of Windows on the IDE drive. If Windows setup can detect/format the IDE drive, it will be a happy camper from there.

    Reconnect the SATA drive and make sure the boot order is correct in your bios setup.

    The reason to disconnect the drive is that it's easy to accidentally format/install windows on the wrong drive, and you want to make sure your PC can boot from the IDE device sooner rather than later.

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    chrishov

    Thank you, I was worried if I tried to do it while the sata was connected that windows would install on the ide but leave the core boot.ini etc on the c: which would cause more problems.

    Excellent help I can't thank you enough!

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    djaburg

    If it were me, I'd Ghost (image) the SATA drive to the IDE drive and then boot from the IDE drive. You can normally select the boot drive via the BIOS on your computer. Keep in mind that the "target" drive during the imaging operation is wiped out so you'd need to ensure that you got any data from it that you want.

    If you were looking to do a clean install, I'd remove the SATA drive, install windows on the IDE drive and get that running. Then I'd hook up the SATA drive as the secondary drive, move any data you needed to the IDE drive and then you could format it to make it clean usable space.

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    0 Votes
    chrishov

    I'm going to go with the disconnect method, seems easiest for me. Thank you very much your information was very helpful! Cheers.

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    robo_dev

    I'd bet two beers that ghosting the SATA to the IDE would not boot and/or would blue-screen windows when it starts.

    The problem is that SATA and IDE use VERY different disk-controller chipsets, so Windows will blue-screen on startup if you ghosted it from one to the other. The disk controller drivers are gonna give it heartburn big time....a fresh install is what you need.

    Since the two drive geometries and or partitions may be different, track zero might not be in the same place.....so depending on the bios and the alignment of the stars, it might not boot at all...'NTLDR not found error'

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    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    If you want to boot to XP Pro as the default Operating System, modify your boot.ini to these settings which are explained later. This is an example.
    <br><br>
    [Boot Loader]
    <br>
    Timeout=10
    <br>
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    <br>
    [operating systems]
    <br>
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
    <br>
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows Server 2003, Standard" /fastdetect
    <br><br>
    The first hard drive is represented by multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    <br>
    Your second hard drive with XP Pro is represented by <b>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS</b>
    <br>
    If you want to change the default drive to the Server change <b>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS</b>
    <br>
    rdisk(0) is your Primary Hard Drive.
    <br>
    rdisk(1) is your Secondary Hard Drive.
    <br>
    partition(1) represents the Boot Partition on the Drive.
    </br>

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    backup everything to the SATA drive and make an extra copy of everything, cos you can never have too many backups.

    Disconnect the SATA drive, and do a fresh install of Windows on the IDE drive. If Windows setup can detect/format the IDE drive, it will be a happy camper from there.

    Reconnect the SATA drive and make sure the boot order is correct in your bios setup.

    The reason to disconnect the drive is that it's easy to accidentally format/install windows on the wrong drive, and you want to make sure your PC can boot from the IDE device sooner rather than later.

    +
    0 Votes
    chrishov

    Thank you, I was worried if I tried to do it while the sata was connected that windows would install on the ide but leave the core boot.ini etc on the c: which would cause more problems.

    Excellent help I can't thank you enough!

    +
    0 Votes
    djaburg

    If it were me, I'd Ghost (image) the SATA drive to the IDE drive and then boot from the IDE drive. You can normally select the boot drive via the BIOS on your computer. Keep in mind that the "target" drive during the imaging operation is wiped out so you'd need to ensure that you got any data from it that you want.

    If you were looking to do a clean install, I'd remove the SATA drive, install windows on the IDE drive and get that running. Then I'd hook up the SATA drive as the secondary drive, move any data you needed to the IDE drive and then you could format it to make it clean usable space.

    +
    0 Votes
    chrishov

    I'm going to go with the disconnect method, seems easiest for me. Thank you very much your information was very helpful! Cheers.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    I'd bet two beers that ghosting the SATA to the IDE would not boot and/or would blue-screen windows when it starts.

    The problem is that SATA and IDE use VERY different disk-controller chipsets, so Windows will blue-screen on startup if you ghosted it from one to the other. The disk controller drivers are gonna give it heartburn big time....a fresh install is what you need.

    Since the two drive geometries and or partitions may be different, track zero might not be in the same place.....so depending on the bios and the alignment of the stars, it might not boot at all...'NTLDR not found error'

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    If you want to boot to XP Pro as the default Operating System, modify your boot.ini to these settings which are explained later. This is an example.
    <br><br>
    [Boot Loader]
    <br>
    Timeout=10
    <br>
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    <br>
    [operating systems]
    <br>
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
    <br>
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows Server 2003, Standard" /fastdetect
    <br><br>
    The first hard drive is represented by multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    <br>
    Your second hard drive with XP Pro is represented by <b>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS</b>
    <br>
    If you want to change the default drive to the Server change <b>default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS</b>
    <br>
    rdisk(0) is your Primary Hard Drive.
    <br>
    rdisk(1) is your Secondary Hard Drive.
    <br>
    partition(1) represents the Boot Partition on the Drive.
    </br>