Questions

dell optiplex 745 time will not stay curent.

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Locked

dell optiplex 745 time will not stay curent.

bucky.banks
I have a problem that I seem I can not find a answer to. I have a Dell Optiplex 745 that in winXP the time keeps reverting back to 1980. I have replaced the CMOS battery on the motherboard. That did not help. Dell has replaced the Motherboard. That did not help. Any ideas? Updates are all there everything else seems normal. I can change the time and with in a few mins it's back to 1980. The BIOS clock was setting it's self to 2156, but after dell replaced the Board it has stayed the same. In total I have about 4 optiplex 745 doing this. Anti virus is up to date. I have also reformatted one of the 745 and it started having the same problem after I reformatted it.
  • +
    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    Double click the clock in the system tray and go to the Internet Time tab. Look to see what server is used to update your time. Change to the other one, which ever that is, and see if that fixes the problem. While you're there, check your default time zone and make sure you're not using the wrong one.

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    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    Download HijackThis and run it and then go to the site below to analyze it to find out if you are infected.
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    http://aumha.org/downloads/hijackthis.exe
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    HijackThis log file analysis
    <br><br>
    Hijack This opens you a possibility to find and fix nasty entries on your computer easier.
    Therefore it will scan special parts in the registry and on your harddisk and compare them with the default settings. If there is some abnormality detected on your computer HijackThis will save them into a logfile. In order to find out what entries are nasty and what are installed by the user, you need some background information.
    <br><br>
    A logfile is not so easy to analyze. Even for an advanced computer user. With the help of this automatic analyzer you are able to get some additional support. Just paste your complete logfile into the textbox at the bottom of this page. Due to a few misunderstandings, I just want to make it clear that this site provides only an online analysis, and not HijackThis the program.
    <br><br>
    http://hijackthis.de/
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    <font size="1"><i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome. </i></font>

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    resetting the Real time Clock (RTC) by shorting it with a jumper.
    <br><br>
    http://phubner.eng.ua.edu/Files/Optiplex%20745/advfeat.htm
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <font size="1"><i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome. </i></font>

    +
    0 Votes
    bucky.banks

    Thanks for the info. None of those seemed to do anything. Hijack did not show anything strange. Any other ideas? Time setting are correct with time zones.

    +
    0 Votes

    Are you able to update the bios on the motherboard?.
    If so then this should sort it out.

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes

    http://www.worldtimeserver.com/atomic-clock/
    Just download this little app and run it. It should keep your server well up to date with the times. (pun intended) :)

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    The only thing that comes to mind is a network trojan/ worm.... you could try a scan with Spybot S&D (my fav. and free) When you reformatted, and ran all your updates, were your other PC's turned on? If so how long was it before it reverted to 1980? I just checked dells site, The new BIOS update is just for USB... and none of their drivers talk about the date issue... but you could try to update the BIOS (might help) if not, its just another thing to rule out...

    +
    0 Votes
    bucky.banks

    Well at first I thought it could be a Norton problem, but that wasn't it. Tried updats, atmoic time programe, Everything is updated. Problem is still there. Dell has replaced motherboard, battery, and bios update. Nothing is fixing this problem. It's stumped everyone anround here in my Tech dept. Thanks for all of your suggestions. I'm trying them all.

    +
    0 Votes

    Explanation: The CMOS battery is working sometimes, but is occasionally failing, causing loss of BIOS settings or error messages.

    Diagnosis: This situation can be very annoying, and in some PCs can last for a very long time. It usually means that the CMOS battery voltage is getting low and that it needs to be replaced, especially if the problem is occurring with increasing frequency. It can also result from a bad connection to the motherboard.

    Recommendation:

    * Double-check the battery connection to the motherboard. If the battery is removable, remove and reinsert it.
    * Replace the CMOS battery, if this is possible with your motherboard.

    There is an apparent failure of the motherboard or a system device on the motherboard

    Explanation: There is suspicion of a possible failure related to the motherboard. This can be a result of a specific message strongly implicating the motherboard in some sort of erratic system behavior. It may also be the case that the motherboard probably isn't the problem, but that we want to rule it out as a possible cause. Since the motherboard is where all the other components meet and connect, a bad motherboard can affect virtually any other part of the PC. For this reason the motherboard must often be checked to ensure it is working properly, even if it is unlikely to be the cause of whatever is happening.

    Diagnosis: Outright motherboard failure is fairly rare in a new system, and extremely rare in a system that is already up and running. Usually, the problem is that the motherboard has been misconfigured or there is a failure with one or more of the components that connect to it. Getting a system in the mail that has a loose component or disconnected cable is very common. In fact, though, there are a surprisingly large possible causes for what may appear to be a motherboard failure.

    Recommendation: Follow the suggestions below to diagnose the possible failure of the motherboard. You will find a lot of possible causes listed below, since there are so many problems that can make it look like the motherboard is at fault. This part of the Troubleshooting Expert is referenced by a large number of other sections. For this reason, you may want to skip some of the steps below if you have already tried them elsewhere. Also, try to avoid the very difficult diagnostic steps--especially replacing the motherboard--until you have exhausted the other possibilities both here and elsewhere on the site:

    * First of all, if you have just recently installed this motherboard, or performed upgrades or additions to the PC of any sort, read this section, which contains items to check that may cause problems after working on the system unit.
    * If the PC isn't booting at all, make sure you have at least the minimums in the machine required to make it work: processor, a full bank of memory, video card, and a drive. Make sure that all of these are inserted correctly into the motherboard, especially the memory. Partially inserted memory modules can cause all sorts of bizarre behavior.
    * Remove all optional devices from the motherboard, including expansion cards, external peripherals, etc. and see if the problem can be resolved.
    * Double-check all the motherboard jumper settings, carefully. Make sure they are all correct. In particular, check the processor type, bus speed, clock multiplier and voltage jumpers. Also make sure the CMOS clear and flash BIOS jumpers are in their normal, default operating positions.
    * Reset all BIOS settings to default, conservative values to make sure an overly aggressive BIOS setting isn't causing the problem. Set all cache, memory and hard disk timing as slow as possible. Turn off BIOS shadowing and see if the problem goes away.
    * Double-check all connections to the motherboard.
    * Check the inside of the case to see if any components seem to be overheating.
    * Inspect the motherboard physically. Check to make sure the board itself isn't cracked; if it is look here. Make sure there are no broken pins or components on the board; if there are, you will have problems with whatever component of the PC uses that connection. Check for any socketed components that may be loose in their sockets, and push them gently but firmly back into the socket if this has happened.
    * Make sure the keyboard is inserted correctly into the motherboard.
    * A failed cache module or using the wrong type can cause motherboard problems. If you suspect it, troubleshoot the secondary cache.
    * An overheated processor can cause system problems. Try troubleshooting the processor.
    * Troubleshoot the system memory. Memory problems are often mistaken for motherboard faults, especially on systems that don't have the protection of using memory error detection.
    * Try troubleshooting the video card or replacing it with another one, preferably a simple straight VGA card that is known to work from being in another system that functioned properly.
    * If the power supply is older, or this is a cheap case, or you have added many new drives to a system with a weaker power supply (especially one that is less than 200W) then you may have a power supply problem. You may want to try replacing it.
    * You may have a BIOS bug or other problem. Check your manufacturer's technical support resources for any known problems with your motherboard. Check on USEnet as well.
    * Contact the technical support department of your system or motherboard manufacturer for additional troubleshooting information. If this is a new motherboard, you may want to consider returning it for an exchange if you have exhausted all other troubleshooting avenues.
    * Some newer viruses, when activated, overwrite part of the BIOS code in systems that employ a flash BIOS. If the BIOS is corrupted, the system won't boot.

    * Try swapping the motherboard with another one and see if the problem resolves itself. If it does then the original motherboard is probably faulty, but it could just have been misconfigured or installed incorrectly.

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    come back in the reformatted PC before or after it was connected to the network.

  • +
    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    Double click the clock in the system tray and go to the Internet Time tab. Look to see what server is used to update your time. Change to the other one, which ever that is, and see if that fixes the problem. While you're there, check your default time zone and make sure you're not using the wrong one.

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    Download HijackThis and run it and then go to the site below to analyze it to find out if you are infected.
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    http://aumha.org/downloads/hijackthis.exe
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    HijackThis log file analysis
    <br><br>
    Hijack This opens you a possibility to find and fix nasty entries on your computer easier.
    Therefore it will scan special parts in the registry and on your harddisk and compare them with the default settings. If there is some abnormality detected on your computer HijackThis will save them into a logfile. In order to find out what entries are nasty and what are installed by the user, you need some background information.
    <br><br>
    A logfile is not so easy to analyze. Even for an advanced computer user. With the help of this automatic analyzer you are able to get some additional support. Just paste your complete logfile into the textbox at the bottom of this page. Due to a few misunderstandings, I just want to make it clear that this site provides only an online analysis, and not HijackThis the program.
    <br><br>
    http://hijackthis.de/
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <br><br>
    <font size="1"><i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome. </i></font>

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    resetting the Real time Clock (RTC) by shorting it with a jumper.
    <br><br>
    http://phubner.eng.ua.edu/Files/Optiplex%20745/advfeat.htm
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <font size="1"><i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome. </i></font>

    +
    0 Votes
    bucky.banks

    Thanks for the info. None of those seemed to do anything. Hijack did not show anything strange. Any other ideas? Time setting are correct with time zones.

    +
    0 Votes

    Are you able to update the bios on the motherboard?.
    If so then this should sort it out.

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes

    http://www.worldtimeserver.com/atomic-clock/
    Just download this little app and run it. It should keep your server well up to date with the times. (pun intended) :)

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    The only thing that comes to mind is a network trojan/ worm.... you could try a scan with Spybot S&D (my fav. and free) When you reformatted, and ran all your updates, were your other PC's turned on? If so how long was it before it reverted to 1980? I just checked dells site, The new BIOS update is just for USB... and none of their drivers talk about the date issue... but you could try to update the BIOS (might help) if not, its just another thing to rule out...

    +
    0 Votes
    bucky.banks

    Well at first I thought it could be a Norton problem, but that wasn't it. Tried updats, atmoic time programe, Everything is updated. Problem is still there. Dell has replaced motherboard, battery, and bios update. Nothing is fixing this problem. It's stumped everyone anround here in my Tech dept. Thanks for all of your suggestions. I'm trying them all.

    +
    0 Votes

    Explanation: The CMOS battery is working sometimes, but is occasionally failing, causing loss of BIOS settings or error messages.

    Diagnosis: This situation can be very annoying, and in some PCs can last for a very long time. It usually means that the CMOS battery voltage is getting low and that it needs to be replaced, especially if the problem is occurring with increasing frequency. It can also result from a bad connection to the motherboard.

    Recommendation:

    * Double-check the battery connection to the motherboard. If the battery is removable, remove and reinsert it.
    * Replace the CMOS battery, if this is possible with your motherboard.

    There is an apparent failure of the motherboard or a system device on the motherboard

    Explanation: There is suspicion of a possible failure related to the motherboard. This can be a result of a specific message strongly implicating the motherboard in some sort of erratic system behavior. It may also be the case that the motherboard probably isn't the problem, but that we want to rule it out as a possible cause. Since the motherboard is where all the other components meet and connect, a bad motherboard can affect virtually any other part of the PC. For this reason the motherboard must often be checked to ensure it is working properly, even if it is unlikely to be the cause of whatever is happening.

    Diagnosis: Outright motherboard failure is fairly rare in a new system, and extremely rare in a system that is already up and running. Usually, the problem is that the motherboard has been misconfigured or there is a failure with one or more of the components that connect to it. Getting a system in the mail that has a loose component or disconnected cable is very common. In fact, though, there are a surprisingly large possible causes for what may appear to be a motherboard failure.

    Recommendation: Follow the suggestions below to diagnose the possible failure of the motherboard. You will find a lot of possible causes listed below, since there are so many problems that can make it look like the motherboard is at fault. This part of the Troubleshooting Expert is referenced by a large number of other sections. For this reason, you may want to skip some of the steps below if you have already tried them elsewhere. Also, try to avoid the very difficult diagnostic steps--especially replacing the motherboard--until you have exhausted the other possibilities both here and elsewhere on the site:

    * First of all, if you have just recently installed this motherboard, or performed upgrades or additions to the PC of any sort, read this section, which contains items to check that may cause problems after working on the system unit.
    * If the PC isn't booting at all, make sure you have at least the minimums in the machine required to make it work: processor, a full bank of memory, video card, and a drive. Make sure that all of these are inserted correctly into the motherboard, especially the memory. Partially inserted memory modules can cause all sorts of bizarre behavior.
    * Remove all optional devices from the motherboard, including expansion cards, external peripherals, etc. and see if the problem can be resolved.
    * Double-check all the motherboard jumper settings, carefully. Make sure they are all correct. In particular, check the processor type, bus speed, clock multiplier and voltage jumpers. Also make sure the CMOS clear and flash BIOS jumpers are in their normal, default operating positions.
    * Reset all BIOS settings to default, conservative values to make sure an overly aggressive BIOS setting isn't causing the problem. Set all cache, memory and hard disk timing as slow as possible. Turn off BIOS shadowing and see if the problem goes away.
    * Double-check all connections to the motherboard.
    * Check the inside of the case to see if any components seem to be overheating.
    * Inspect the motherboard physically. Check to make sure the board itself isn't cracked; if it is look here. Make sure there are no broken pins or components on the board; if there are, you will have problems with whatever component of the PC uses that connection. Check for any socketed components that may be loose in their sockets, and push them gently but firmly back into the socket if this has happened.
    * Make sure the keyboard is inserted correctly into the motherboard.
    * A failed cache module or using the wrong type can cause motherboard problems. If you suspect it, troubleshoot the secondary cache.
    * An overheated processor can cause system problems. Try troubleshooting the processor.
    * Troubleshoot the system memory. Memory problems are often mistaken for motherboard faults, especially on systems that don't have the protection of using memory error detection.
    * Try troubleshooting the video card or replacing it with another one, preferably a simple straight VGA card that is known to work from being in another system that functioned properly.
    * If the power supply is older, or this is a cheap case, or you have added many new drives to a system with a weaker power supply (especially one that is less than 200W) then you may have a power supply problem. You may want to try replacing it.
    * You may have a BIOS bug or other problem. Check your manufacturer's technical support resources for any known problems with your motherboard. Check on USEnet as well.
    * Contact the technical support department of your system or motherboard manufacturer for additional troubleshooting information. If this is a new motherboard, you may want to consider returning it for an exchange if you have exhausted all other troubleshooting avenues.
    * Some newer viruses, when activated, overwrite part of the BIOS code in systems that employ a flash BIOS. If the BIOS is corrupted, the system won't boot.

    * Try swapping the motherboard with another one and see if the problem resolves itself. If it does then the original motherboard is probably faulty, but it could just have been misconfigured or installed incorrectly.

    Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
    If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    come back in the reformatted PC before or after it was connected to the network.