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DHCP Router MESS with ATT Uverse Please HELP!!!

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DHCP Router MESS with ATT Uverse Please HELP!!!

Firebird2010
Hello everyone! I am new to this group and need to get my these (2) systems up and running for this church web server and email server.

Ok so here is the big picture situation. I do NOT know much about router configs other then the basics of gateway and static IP and dynamic IP address simple stuff. My problem is that I have a ATT modem service to are area that will only allow a certain modem gateway to be used. It has a DHCP server built into the gateway, impossible to disable. I checked and double checked with ATT Uverse. I have 8 static IP addresses they gave me. I will make up these addresses just so you can follow along here.

Some History and background:
-----------------------------
I can USE (1) LAN Card off the mother board and/or add a 2nd LAN card in the PCi slot. My computer is new and fast and has 4 gig of ram and plenty of space. I doubt this is a hardware or software issue. More or less a Router setup and TCP/IP setup and DHCP problem.

88.23.110.7 used to be my Dynamic IP address. Supposely this could change at any time and renew. Always stayed the same no matter what they said about Dynamic Ip addresses changing. So this would come into my Uverse router and the DHCP server of my Uverse would give out 192.168.1.3 thru 192.168.1.50 to any desktop computers in the church. The gateway to enter the modem was 192.168.1.254.
Next....we purchased a set of IP static addresses:
We shall call them : these fake (8) here
55.22.117.71 thru 55.22.117.78
55.22.117.76 gets hard wired into the Uverse Modem as the new gateway address. (Why? No idea its just how Uverse sets it up)
55.22.117.77 is the Broadcast OUT
55.22.117.78 is the Broadcast IN
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So I am left with (5) Static IP adx's to give to my (2) servers here.
So Microsoft Small Business Server 2008 will go on 55.22.117.71 (or .72, or 73 or 74 or .75 doesnt matter really) Linux Server Fedora 10 same thing. So we will pu that on address 55.22.117.72
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Here is the problem. When I attempt to setup any Server, either Linux or Windows, it tells me. I have a DHCP server ALREADY on the network 55.22.117.76 (its telling me the address of the gateway every time) so please disconnect from the DHCP and then hit continue with the setup. And this makes perfect sense to me. The server wants to create its own DHCP server and spool out its own addresses. I get that.
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How can I solve this problem since I can NOT shut off my DHCP server on the Uverse gateway modem? Does anyone have a simple step by step solution? I can offer up any details on my gateway router options if you ask. And I guess I can inject another router or LAN card in between my server and gateway as well. So there are options here.

Or a web page site with details on this? Thank you so much for any help and God Bless! You can email privately or post here. Whatever you would prefer. I accept emails. :)
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    0 Votes
    seanferd

    DHCP should give them one of the valid addresses from the pool of 5.

    Otherwise, if for some reason you just need static internet-facing IP address, you shouldn't need any staic addresses internally.

    I suppose another choice, if you want static addresses in the LAN, would be to set up another plain router between the Uverse gateway and the LAN.

    I'm sure someone much more knowledgeable than I will be more specific. Best of luck.

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    0 Votes
    Firebird2010

    Forgive me here, I am new to tech, and still in process of doing self-elearning education. I have heard you can buy DNS services to mimick a static IP address but I always assumed if you want to setup a real server using the Church Domain .org then its best to have an ip address to the domain for name resolution. They used to have a dynamic ip address, (the strange thing is that the same dynamic seems to be still there somewhat as I explained earlier) So do I really need a static to setup these (2) servers for the church? What is best security and etc etc. I really do not know that answer. But for now we have (5) statics they gave us as explained earlier and still no resolution on how to get the statics to play nice with this gateway router. I was told a huge clue to my problem is that when the server returns an error during setup, its says, "Please disable your DHCP server on this network and then it lists the static IP address 55.22.117.76 (used as the gateway for the static sets)

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    seanferd

    http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/
    For free, they point a domain name at your dynamic IP.

    But this is for your internet-facing address, and you already have one of those (the external address of the gateway).

    edit: Not entirely sure her, but can't you just physically disconnect from the gateway while you set up the server?

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    0 Votes
    Firebird2010

    Ok that worked. But it did not help much in the long run, but thanks for reply. I was able to get past the intial setup. So now what I have is an error sitting in my cue for Windows 2008 SBS saying I need to correct the DHCP and get it off the network. The internet works if I give it a static Ip address. But it won't give out DHCP addresses at all to any of the desktops in the Church building. So now I guess somehow I tweak this server and the router into what? I am lost here. I guess what I need to do is create some sort of "wall" in which the server can not see the DHCP server on the modem BUT see the static IP addresses. I think I might need to start reading more but I have no clue where to begin. More info here to add on status of the network. This is now a real problem the way it is, I can not get any of the printers or desktops to see the server network or get internet access. Just the server works with a fixed static IP or with putting it to accept DHCP from the modem.

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I'll come back occasionally, or you can as well, and edit a post or add a new one to keep your question in the active display of listed questions.

    I really can't suggest anything further myself.

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    seanferd

     

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    Firebird2010

    Still no luck in solving this. It appears this has stumped everyone. I am surprised more people with this modem does NOT have this problem but then again I was informed this morning that this is a new 2 month old product and all. So how many users they have on this gateway with static IP addresses. Want to take a guess? Less then 500 I was told nationwide. ughhh!!! I guess they do not market this products and services to well. Anyone want to try and help me please? Thanks for any support. :)

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

    Someone who knows the first thing about networking probably has an obvious answer. :)

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

    Bump

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

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    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

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    BDAdkins

    The Uverse services in my oppinion provides misleading advertising about static ip addresses.

    They are non-conventional static ip addresses. You have to kuldge your systems to work with them.

    Let me tell you how to do it with their latest 3wire Uverse router they gave me.

    YOU CAN disable the DHCP, but if you do you won't be able to use any of those needed static IP addresses. So, practially speaking you cannot disable the DHCP.

    I suggest you do the following particularly if you are going to install a typical business IT setup:

    Buy a netgear VPN Firewall/router. We use the FVS338. WOrks great for us and we have 3 of them that links 3 offices worldwide via vpn. You can however use any router that will provide the following features for setup.

    You will need to use a router that is non-specific, meaning not a DSL or Cable router, just an ethernet router. We'll call it the netgear router for this explanation.

    Only the netgear router will be connected to the Uverse 3wire router. You will leave the 3wire router setup as shipped. However, I suggest you setup the wireless portion of that 3wire router with SSID and Passphrase to something you can remember, and use that only for configuration of the 3wire router. Otherwise you'll always have to plug a computer into the router to configure it.

    As I write this I don't have access to my 3wire router, so the setup on that will be from my memory. YOu need to go to the Home Network Settings and choose "Advanced Settings". Then near the lower left of the screen you can enable a Public Subnet. Now let's say the range of Ip addresses end in 52 thru 59. In that case, you will enter for the router ip address xxx.xxx.xxx.58, subnet mask 255.255.255.248.

    Then you will allow your router to obtain a local ip address from DHCP. Next on that advanced settings screen, on the right column ther is a button labeled something like "edit ip assignments" or something similar to that.

    That will take you to a screen that lists the active locl IP address for DHCP devices. Find the Ip address corresponding to your router and in the left drop down choose something like "public pool" or something indicating you want that to be a public ip address. Then in the right pull down select the ip address you want it to be.

    Save that, and then go to your router and make it renew its IP address. Then it will have the public/static ip address.

    You can do this same thing with the servers if you don't want to use the router as mentioned above. That would allow you to let them all have public ip addresses (static). Then you could put a second network card in eath of those servers and run your internal network on those nics, where you can setup a dhcp server inside your office.

    I only have uverse at home, so I don't really need the other static ip addresses. If I do, I'll have to figure out a way to deal with them through the net gear router.

    The thing is idiotic AT&T is not contemplating anybody wanting to assign a single device multiple ip addresses.

    This is idiotic and stupid, because it would be EASY for the 3wire router software to allow this very common and standard TCP/IP protocl setup. They are just idiots.

    AND don't expect even their tier 2 support to know anything. They told me explicitly that all they do is read you knowledge base instructions. They don't necessarily know what the instructions mean. But, at least the guy spoke English matching an American accent. I personally don't care where they are, just as long as I can communicate with them - and if they know what they are talking about, which with AT&T, they probably don't!!!!

    -Barry

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    0 Votes
    willcomp

    What AT&T DSL modem router do you have? Are you using another router? If so, which one?

    My experience is with Bellsouth and Cayman (Netopia) DSL modem/routers. Bellsouth had good instructions for configuring the Cayman modem/routers.

    http://support.att.net/bellsouth/asp/contentview.asp?isbrowse=true&sprt_cid=a0747b91-8e0e-491f-8218-513fc2e8899d

    Edited to add link.

  • +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    DHCP should give them one of the valid addresses from the pool of 5.

    Otherwise, if for some reason you just need static internet-facing IP address, you shouldn't need any staic addresses internally.

    I suppose another choice, if you want static addresses in the LAN, would be to set up another plain router between the Uverse gateway and the LAN.

    I'm sure someone much more knowledgeable than I will be more specific. Best of luck.

    +
    0 Votes
    Firebird2010

    Forgive me here, I am new to tech, and still in process of doing self-elearning education. I have heard you can buy DNS services to mimick a static IP address but I always assumed if you want to setup a real server using the Church Domain .org then its best to have an ip address to the domain for name resolution. They used to have a dynamic ip address, (the strange thing is that the same dynamic seems to be still there somewhat as I explained earlier) So do I really need a static to setup these (2) servers for the church? What is best security and etc etc. I really do not know that answer. But for now we have (5) statics they gave us as explained earlier and still no resolution on how to get the statics to play nice with this gateway router. I was told a huge clue to my problem is that when the server returns an error during setup, its says, "Please disable your DHCP server on this network and then it lists the static IP address 55.22.117.76 (used as the gateway for the static sets)

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/
    For free, they point a domain name at your dynamic IP.

    But this is for your internet-facing address, and you already have one of those (the external address of the gateway).

    edit: Not entirely sure her, but can't you just physically disconnect from the gateway while you set up the server?

    +
    0 Votes
    Firebird2010

    Ok that worked. But it did not help much in the long run, but thanks for reply. I was able to get past the intial setup. So now what I have is an error sitting in my cue for Windows 2008 SBS saying I need to correct the DHCP and get it off the network. The internet works if I give it a static Ip address. But it won't give out DHCP addresses at all to any of the desktops in the Church building. So now I guess somehow I tweak this server and the router into what? I am lost here. I guess what I need to do is create some sort of "wall" in which the server can not see the DHCP server on the modem BUT see the static IP addresses. I think I might need to start reading more but I have no clue where to begin. More info here to add on status of the network. This is now a real problem the way it is, I can not get any of the printers or desktops to see the server network or get internet access. Just the server works with a fixed static IP or with putting it to accept DHCP from the modem.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I'll come back occasionally, or you can as well, and edit a post or add a new one to keep your question in the active display of listed questions.

    I really can't suggest anything further myself.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

    +
    0 Votes
    Firebird2010

    Still no luck in solving this. It appears this has stumped everyone. I am surprised more people with this modem does NOT have this problem but then again I was informed this morning that this is a new 2 month old product and all. So how many users they have on this gateway with static IP addresses. Want to take a guess? Less then 500 I was told nationwide. ughhh!!! I guess they do not market this products and services to well. Anyone want to try and help me please? Thanks for any support. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    Someone who knows the first thing about networking probably has an obvious answer. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    Bump

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

     

    +
    0 Votes
    BDAdkins

    The Uverse services in my oppinion provides misleading advertising about static ip addresses.

    They are non-conventional static ip addresses. You have to kuldge your systems to work with them.

    Let me tell you how to do it with their latest 3wire Uverse router they gave me.

    YOU CAN disable the DHCP, but if you do you won't be able to use any of those needed static IP addresses. So, practially speaking you cannot disable the DHCP.

    I suggest you do the following particularly if you are going to install a typical business IT setup:

    Buy a netgear VPN Firewall/router. We use the FVS338. WOrks great for us and we have 3 of them that links 3 offices worldwide via vpn. You can however use any router that will provide the following features for setup.

    You will need to use a router that is non-specific, meaning not a DSL or Cable router, just an ethernet router. We'll call it the netgear router for this explanation.

    Only the netgear router will be connected to the Uverse 3wire router. You will leave the 3wire router setup as shipped. However, I suggest you setup the wireless portion of that 3wire router with SSID and Passphrase to something you can remember, and use that only for configuration of the 3wire router. Otherwise you'll always have to plug a computer into the router to configure it.

    As I write this I don't have access to my 3wire router, so the setup on that will be from my memory. YOu need to go to the Home Network Settings and choose "Advanced Settings". Then near the lower left of the screen you can enable a Public Subnet. Now let's say the range of Ip addresses end in 52 thru 59. In that case, you will enter for the router ip address xxx.xxx.xxx.58, subnet mask 255.255.255.248.

    Then you will allow your router to obtain a local ip address from DHCP. Next on that advanced settings screen, on the right column ther is a button labeled something like "edit ip assignments" or something similar to that.

    That will take you to a screen that lists the active locl IP address for DHCP devices. Find the Ip address corresponding to your router and in the left drop down choose something like "public pool" or something indicating you want that to be a public ip address. Then in the right pull down select the ip address you want it to be.

    Save that, and then go to your router and make it renew its IP address. Then it will have the public/static ip address.

    You can do this same thing with the servers if you don't want to use the router as mentioned above. That would allow you to let them all have public ip addresses (static). Then you could put a second network card in eath of those servers and run your internal network on those nics, where you can setup a dhcp server inside your office.

    I only have uverse at home, so I don't really need the other static ip addresses. If I do, I'll have to figure out a way to deal with them through the net gear router.

    The thing is idiotic AT&T is not contemplating anybody wanting to assign a single device multiple ip addresses.

    This is idiotic and stupid, because it would be EASY for the 3wire router software to allow this very common and standard TCP/IP protocl setup. They are just idiots.

    AND don't expect even their tier 2 support to know anything. They told me explicitly that all they do is read you knowledge base instructions. They don't necessarily know what the instructions mean. But, at least the guy spoke English matching an American accent. I personally don't care where they are, just as long as I can communicate with them - and if they know what they are talking about, which with AT&T, they probably don't!!!!

    -Barry

    +
    0 Votes
    willcomp

    What AT&T DSL modem router do you have? Are you using another router? If so, which one?

    My experience is with Bellsouth and Cayman (Netopia) DSL modem/routers. Bellsouth had good instructions for configuring the Cayman modem/routers.

    http://support.att.net/bellsouth/asp/contentview.asp?isbrowse=true&sprt_cid=a0747b91-8e0e-491f-8218-513fc2e8899d

    Edited to add link.