Questions

Do you use a Cisco VoIP solution?

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Do you use a Cisco VoIP solution?

jdclyde
Greetings all.

A few years ago, we had gotten some MultiTech VoIP boxes that allowed us to plug our existing PBX into our Frame, converting it into IP traffic. Saved a lot of money by being able to get rid of a T1.

5 years later, the boxes are dying and ugly death and HAVE to be replaced.

A vendor recommended dropping a VWIC card in our routers and letting them do the conversion to IP traffic instead of buying new MultiTech boxes.

Is anyone using a system like this now? If so, what do you like and dislike?

We have a Cisco 2801 at the main office and Cisco 2621's at the remote locations.


I am NOT a phone guy, so would really like to hear from some of you out there that are. Need to have something to bring to the table tomorrow morning (Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008).

Thanks for any input on this!

jd
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    SYNner

    If you don't plan on scrapping out your PBX system, make sure that your pbx will trunk to the cisco. At first, it's gonna be just a VWIC multiflex T1 card into the router and then it's gonna be an upgrade to the routers hardware (memory, PVDM, AIM, etc). From there, it'll be too late to turn back and you have too much investment into the solution already so you'll be scrapping you PBX and putting in Cisco call manager express. Then you are going to find out that CME doesn't have enough support for all of your users plus you have to upgrade the 2801. Then it's gonna be a full blown call manager. Then you are going to find that your 2621s don't support PVDM and FX modules for some of the features like SRST and CUE, so you'll be scrapping out that router and putting in new 2800 series routers. At the end, you'll be out thousands and thousands of dollars. And then you'll find that you don't have the expertise to maintain the new equipment and it's more MONEY for them to support you...

    Basically, have a plan.

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    jdclyde

    to make a plan....

    That is why I am putting this out here, to find out the little "gotchas" before hand.

    I am prepared to replace the three 2621's if I have to, but would RATHER not. Even if I DID replace the 2621's, it still isn't any more expensive than if I went with new MultiTech boxes, which is something I do NOT want to do.

    The PBX does currently connect to the MultiTech boxes, and scrapping it is NOT an option at this time.

    PVDM. Dang it, not I have to go look that up! SRST? starting my list. Feels like I am back in the Cisco Academy getting assigned more vocabulary assignments! B-)

    Are you using these, or have you used them? Are you an installer, or is this from a personal horror story?

    Thanks for the input.

    jd

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    0 Votes
    SYNner

    I don't use these. I'm not an installer and it's not a personal horror story. It was my friend's experience. I'm in the service provider VoIP arena.

    What are your requirements for this conversion? Keeping the old PBX? Getting rid of the MultiTech all together? What are the features that you are looking for? How are the remote sites connected to the main site? Do each of the remote sites have their own phone system or is the multitech providing IP phone services to the remote sites? Are your existing equipments compatible with the new proposed solution?

    basically, you got a couple options right now, scrap the multitech, put some cisco equipments in and operate a hybrid and slowly migrate to full voip deployment or keep everything the way it is, put in a cisco call manager and slowly migrate the customers to it and scrapping out the old legacy pbx and multitech.

    The question you have to ask yourself is, where do the inhouse expertise lie and which solution is better in the long run in terms of ROI.

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    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    Looking to keep the existing PBX's in place. Each location has their own local PBX.

    Connected by Frame Relay.

    Right now the PBX's plug into the MultiTechs, which plug into the network.

    I just want to replace the MultiTechs.

    Will dropping a VWIC in the Ciscos do that for me?

    Not looking for change of functionality or features. The MultiTech VoIP boxes are toast and have to be replaced, and so looking for a solution to do what we are doing now, but without the MultiTechs.

    Thanks

    jd

  • +
    0 Votes
    SYNner

    If you don't plan on scrapping out your PBX system, make sure that your pbx will trunk to the cisco. At first, it's gonna be just a VWIC multiflex T1 card into the router and then it's gonna be an upgrade to the routers hardware (memory, PVDM, AIM, etc). From there, it'll be too late to turn back and you have too much investment into the solution already so you'll be scrapping you PBX and putting in Cisco call manager express. Then you are going to find out that CME doesn't have enough support for all of your users plus you have to upgrade the 2801. Then it's gonna be a full blown call manager. Then you are going to find that your 2621s don't support PVDM and FX modules for some of the features like SRST and CUE, so you'll be scrapping out that router and putting in new 2800 series routers. At the end, you'll be out thousands and thousands of dollars. And then you'll find that you don't have the expertise to maintain the new equipment and it's more MONEY for them to support you...

    Basically, have a plan.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    to make a plan....

    That is why I am putting this out here, to find out the little "gotchas" before hand.

    I am prepared to replace the three 2621's if I have to, but would RATHER not. Even if I DID replace the 2621's, it still isn't any more expensive than if I went with new MultiTech boxes, which is something I do NOT want to do.

    The PBX does currently connect to the MultiTech boxes, and scrapping it is NOT an option at this time.

    PVDM. Dang it, not I have to go look that up! SRST? starting my list. Feels like I am back in the Cisco Academy getting assigned more vocabulary assignments! B-)

    Are you using these, or have you used them? Are you an installer, or is this from a personal horror story?

    Thanks for the input.

    jd

    +
    0 Votes
    SYNner

    I don't use these. I'm not an installer and it's not a personal horror story. It was my friend's experience. I'm in the service provider VoIP arena.

    What are your requirements for this conversion? Keeping the old PBX? Getting rid of the MultiTech all together? What are the features that you are looking for? How are the remote sites connected to the main site? Do each of the remote sites have their own phone system or is the multitech providing IP phone services to the remote sites? Are your existing equipments compatible with the new proposed solution?

    basically, you got a couple options right now, scrap the multitech, put some cisco equipments in and operate a hybrid and slowly migrate to full voip deployment or keep everything the way it is, put in a cisco call manager and slowly migrate the customers to it and scrapping out the old legacy pbx and multitech.

    The question you have to ask yourself is, where do the inhouse expertise lie and which solution is better in the long run in terms of ROI.

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    Looking to keep the existing PBX's in place. Each location has their own local PBX.

    Connected by Frame Relay.

    Right now the PBX's plug into the MultiTechs, which plug into the network.

    I just want to replace the MultiTechs.

    Will dropping a VWIC in the Ciscos do that for me?

    Not looking for change of functionality or features. The MultiTech VoIP boxes are toast and have to be replaced, and so looking for a solution to do what we are doing now, but without the MultiTechs.

    Thanks

    jd