Questions

Dual Boot OS troubles

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Dual Boot OS troubles

tchanssen
I have Linux on my stand alone PC, I want to load Windows Server 2003. Then have the dual boot OS option. Either Linux or Server. My OS now is Linux, I can't get Server to boot from a CD at start up. It just goes on to the Linux OS. What to do?
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    thedrummer2006

    Did you check your bios and make sure your cd-rom is set to boot before the hard disk? Also make sure your bios is not set to quick boot becuse I have seen some mobos where you will never see the cd-boot option prompt due to the quick boot.

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    0 Votes

    try

    jamesatmaisonverre

    Ihad this problem myself,and to get rid of that stupid boot options menu ,you have to go into the bios and set the bios options to minimum and then boot from cd.Check if the cd rom is set to boot in the bios options as well.

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    Macgyver.Hicks

    I tried running Win2K3 server as a dual boot. When you do get the install going, it will want the entire drive. It will not install on a partition. Make sure you back up any data from your linux. To dual boot, you will have to reinstall linux after you install Win2K3 creating and resizing the partitions.

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    Mad-H

    Have a search around - I found a utility for creating a linux CD boot disk for older machines that can't boot directly from CD. I think it was FreeDOS

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    bhatnagar_nitin

    I assume that you installed Linux using Linux CD, right ! That means, you did boot your computer from a Linux CD and all worked well. This clarifies that your BIOS options for booting from the IDE drives are correct viz. first one is set to boot from CD. Therefore, the only point remaining in not booting Win2K3 from the CD is that either CD is corrupt or the CD is not made as bootable. Try checking you Win2K3 CD.

    If that is not the case, I suggest you to follow the install sequence which I always do when having dual boots.
    1) First install Win2K3 OS on your C: drive having set it to be partitioned(C: and D:).
    2) Next install Linux in a different partition and it will automatically add the LILO prompt(dual boot option) to your MBR prompting you to boot into one of the OSs.

    Also, as earlier pointed out but by somebody in this thread that Win2K3 is greedy and takes all of your drive(C:), no matter you partition it into different drives; then in that case next best option to follow is: 1) Install Win2K3 and then re-partition and resize it into smaller drives(C: and D:) using Partition Magic software. It's a pretty good sofware to partition your drives in the realtime(You can actually re-partition while windows is running).
    2) Next install Linux in the newly created partition using Linux CD. Offcourse you need to convert that partition into Linux File System.

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    stuoutlaw1

    I don't know what you guys do but I have had no problems making W2K3 run on a smaller partition that I have had it create itself when installing on a large HDD I've installed it on as small as 10gb of an 80gb drive with a dual boot to XP or whatever I have wanted to put on it even long after setting up Server this should not be that hard

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    canopic@clear

    I do a lot of dual booting and installations from CD/DVD drives, and have discovered a lot of anomolies ...
    First, does your CD/DVD drive boot other disks such as LIVE CD and LIVE DVD linux Distros?
    If your answer to this is yes, then it must surely just be your WS2003 disk(s)
    Is WS2003 on CDs or DVDs?
    I have seen DVD readers that will boot DVDs but not CDs. [The opposite situation would not surprise me either].
    If nothing boots from this drive then:
    a) Check your BIOS settings which I am sure you have done.
    b) Check if your Drive is setup as a Master or a Slave. Some drives only boot if they are setup as Master.
    c) Check the internet to see if there is an update for your Flash Bios.
    I have other thoughts - but you should work through these ones first.
    I run systems with up to 22 partitions on a drive and boot into up to 12 operating systems off a given hard disk. I have tried grub, lilo, Paragon BM, the Windows BootMgr and many others. Mostly I am back to using grub as the most convenient, especially if you change your systems a lot.

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    0 Votes
    rwe9

    Dear Sir:

    are you trying to run linux from a CD, which in this case seems to be the easiest. Most Linux install cd disks will boot and just run linux, and not install onto your hard drive. Or will install onto a hard drive partition, if you choose this option. Why not just run from the cd, and forget the Hdrive install.

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    0 Votes
    rwe9

    Dear Sir:

    are you trying to run linux from a CD, which in this case seems to be the easiest. Most Linux install cd disks will boot and just run linux, and not install onto your hard drive. Or will install onto a hard drive partition, if you choose this option. Why not just run from the cd, and forget the Hdrive install.

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    0 Votes
    howdougd

    I have Ubuntu Linux on one drive and Windows on another. My Hard Drive Selector Switch determines which drive I boot, no problems. To make a switch see my diagrams at

    http://www.imhdd.ms11.net/

    A link to the switch is near the top on my Home Page.

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    0 Votes
    Roquenton

    NoFear, it sounds like Howdougd's drive selector switch is the magic bullet and it is. But there is a little known multi-boot program which hasn't been mentioned yet called "BootIt New Generation" which can be downloaded from their web site at: http://www.terabyteunlimited.com. It works like this: BootIt NG installs its own MBR and what it calls an Extended MBR as well as its own small partition onto your drive which will allow you to boot into up to 256 separate OSes. The only requirement that I suggest is this: Make sure that your distribution of Linux will at some point during the installation process prompt you as to where you would like to install the boot loader. You would normally have to follow the "Expert" (as in Suse linux) or "Custom" (as with RedHat) installation paths in order to do this and you would select /dev/hda1 (the /boot partition in RedHat) as opposed
    to /dev/hda which is the MBR. If your distro doesn't allow you to do this then it's probably not worth fooling with. But if it does then just download the evaluation version and give it a try. What have you got to lose?

  • +
    0 Votes
    thedrummer2006

    Did you check your bios and make sure your cd-rom is set to boot before the hard disk? Also make sure your bios is not set to quick boot becuse I have seen some mobos where you will never see the cd-boot option prompt due to the quick boot.

    +
    0 Votes

    try

    jamesatmaisonverre

    Ihad this problem myself,and to get rid of that stupid boot options menu ,you have to go into the bios and set the bios options to minimum and then boot from cd.Check if the cd rom is set to boot in the bios options as well.

    +
    0 Votes
    Macgyver.Hicks

    I tried running Win2K3 server as a dual boot. When you do get the install going, it will want the entire drive. It will not install on a partition. Make sure you back up any data from your linux. To dual boot, you will have to reinstall linux after you install Win2K3 creating and resizing the partitions.

    +
    0 Votes
    Mad-H

    Have a search around - I found a utility for creating a linux CD boot disk for older machines that can't boot directly from CD. I think it was FreeDOS

    +
    0 Votes
    bhatnagar_nitin

    I assume that you installed Linux using Linux CD, right ! That means, you did boot your computer from a Linux CD and all worked well. This clarifies that your BIOS options for booting from the IDE drives are correct viz. first one is set to boot from CD. Therefore, the only point remaining in not booting Win2K3 from the CD is that either CD is corrupt or the CD is not made as bootable. Try checking you Win2K3 CD.

    If that is not the case, I suggest you to follow the install sequence which I always do when having dual boots.
    1) First install Win2K3 OS on your C: drive having set it to be partitioned(C: and D:).
    2) Next install Linux in a different partition and it will automatically add the LILO prompt(dual boot option) to your MBR prompting you to boot into one of the OSs.

    Also, as earlier pointed out but by somebody in this thread that Win2K3 is greedy and takes all of your drive(C:), no matter you partition it into different drives; then in that case next best option to follow is: 1) Install Win2K3 and then re-partition and resize it into smaller drives(C: and D:) using Partition Magic software. It's a pretty good sofware to partition your drives in the realtime(You can actually re-partition while windows is running).
    2) Next install Linux in the newly created partition using Linux CD. Offcourse you need to convert that partition into Linux File System.

    +
    0 Votes
    stuoutlaw1

    I don't know what you guys do but I have had no problems making W2K3 run on a smaller partition that I have had it create itself when installing on a large HDD I've installed it on as small as 10gb of an 80gb drive with a dual boot to XP or whatever I have wanted to put on it even long after setting up Server this should not be that hard

    +
    0 Votes
    canopic@clear

    I do a lot of dual booting and installations from CD/DVD drives, and have discovered a lot of anomolies ...
    First, does your CD/DVD drive boot other disks such as LIVE CD and LIVE DVD linux Distros?
    If your answer to this is yes, then it must surely just be your WS2003 disk(s)
    Is WS2003 on CDs or DVDs?
    I have seen DVD readers that will boot DVDs but not CDs. [The opposite situation would not surprise me either].
    If nothing boots from this drive then:
    a) Check your BIOS settings which I am sure you have done.
    b) Check if your Drive is setup as a Master or a Slave. Some drives only boot if they are setup as Master.
    c) Check the internet to see if there is an update for your Flash Bios.
    I have other thoughts - but you should work through these ones first.
    I run systems with up to 22 partitions on a drive and boot into up to 12 operating systems off a given hard disk. I have tried grub, lilo, Paragon BM, the Windows BootMgr and many others. Mostly I am back to using grub as the most convenient, especially if you change your systems a lot.

    +
    0 Votes
    rwe9

    Dear Sir:

    are you trying to run linux from a CD, which in this case seems to be the easiest. Most Linux install cd disks will boot and just run linux, and not install onto your hard drive. Or will install onto a hard drive partition, if you choose this option. Why not just run from the cd, and forget the Hdrive install.

    +
    0 Votes
    rwe9

    Dear Sir:

    are you trying to run linux from a CD, which in this case seems to be the easiest. Most Linux install cd disks will boot and just run linux, and not install onto your hard drive. Or will install onto a hard drive partition, if you choose this option. Why not just run from the cd, and forget the Hdrive install.

    +
    0 Votes
    howdougd

    I have Ubuntu Linux on one drive and Windows on another. My Hard Drive Selector Switch determines which drive I boot, no problems. To make a switch see my diagrams at

    http://www.imhdd.ms11.net/

    A link to the switch is near the top on my Home Page.

    +
    0 Votes
    Roquenton

    NoFear, it sounds like Howdougd's drive selector switch is the magic bullet and it is. But there is a little known multi-boot program which hasn't been mentioned yet called "BootIt New Generation" which can be downloaded from their web site at: http://www.terabyteunlimited.com. It works like this: BootIt NG installs its own MBR and what it calls an Extended MBR as well as its own small partition onto your drive which will allow you to boot into up to 256 separate OSes. The only requirement that I suggest is this: Make sure that your distribution of Linux will at some point during the installation process prompt you as to where you would like to install the boot loader. You would normally have to follow the "Expert" (as in Suse linux) or "Custom" (as with RedHat) installation paths in order to do this and you would select /dev/hda1 (the /boot partition in RedHat) as opposed
    to /dev/hda which is the MBR. If your distro doesn't allow you to do this then it's probably not worth fooling with. But if it does then just download the evaluation version and give it a try. What have you got to lose?