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gateway laptop windows XP won't boot up.

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gateway laptop windows XP won't boot up.

vikingwwa
This is my first post and hoping some of you more experienced could help, I have a Gateway laptop MX 3702 model, doing weird things, the first problems were with the thing heating up and shutting off only when plugged in with power cord but then if we ran it off the battery it was fine, so we started charging the battery when the laptop was off, now it won't boot up when turned on it goes to the gateway logo then to the windows logo, then to a screen asking to choose several options like start windows normally, safe mode, last known config. etc. then counts down, then the vitious circle starts all over again, I noticed that when I choose an option it flashes a blue screen for a split second with info. I can't read, then goes back to the windows didn't start normally and choose an option.
we have since replaced the power cord with no difference to it booting normal.
Is there any advice as to what we can do?
  • +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    To grab your Gateway Recovery Disc and reinstall the System. Windows has somehow become corrupted and several important files are either missing or are corrupt.

    What is more of a worry is the fact that it will not work on Mains Power. The M'Board in this unit has to be faulty and needs repair/replacing depending on what is wrong. It is quite possible that this is the cause of the Problem here.

    Just a note of caution here if you have data on the HDD that you want to keep using the Recovery Disc will delete it so you need to remove the HDD fit it to a USB Caddy and plug this into another computer to save your Data before proceeding with repairing Windows.

    If you have access to a Install Disc made by M$ of the same version as your current OS you can maybe do a Repair Install but it has to be the same version of the OS to accept your Product Key. The directions for a Repair Install of XP are below

    How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
    View products that this article applies to.
    Article ID : 315341
    Last Review : January 28, 2008
    Revision : 5.2
    This article was previously published under Q315341
    On This Page

    INTRODUCTION

    MORE INFORMATION

    Before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade

    Troubleshooting

    Internet Explorer 7

    Data backup

    Windows Installation CD

    Device drivers

    Programs

    Network settings

    Internet provider information

    Startup sequence

    Windows XP preinstalled

    Windows XP Service Pack 2

    Method 1: Reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP

    Method 2: Repair install of Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD

    After you perform an in-place upgrade

    Reinstall all updates to Windows

    Reinstall Internet Explorer 7
    INTRODUCTION
    This article describes how to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP. This is also named a repair installation. It reinstalls Windows XP to the same folder. You may want to perform an in-place upgrade if your installation of Windows XP must be repaired. Such a repair installation may be required if one of the following conditions is true:? You cannot start Windows XP in safe mode.

    For more information about how to start your Windows XP-based computer in safe mode, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    315222 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222/) A description of the Safe Mode Boot options in Windows XP
    ? You cannot start Windows XP after you install a Microsoft software update.
    ? There is a registry problem that cannot be solved by using other tools such as System Restore.

    For more information about System Restore, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    306084 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306084/) How to restore the operating system to a previous state in Windows XP
    ? You must apply default (file and registry) permissions to your Windows XP installation. This condition occurs because of missing or damaged program files after you make changes or updates to your computer or programs.
    ? You must register COM components and Windows File Protection (WFP) files. This condition occurs because of missing or damaged system files.
    ? You must use the Windows Setup program to enumerate Plug and Play devices again. This includes the hardware abstraction layer (HAL).
    To reinstall Windows XP, use the appropriate method in the "More information" section.
    Back to the top

    MORE INFORMATION
    Note You may want to disconnect from the Internet during the installation. Disconnecting from the Internet during the installation helps protect you from malicious users. You may also want to enable the firewall in Internet Explorer.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    283673 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283673/) How to turn on or turn off the firewall in Windows XP
    Back to the top

    Before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade
    Review the following topics before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade of Windows XP.
    Troubleshooting
    If you feel comfortable troubleshooting, consider the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade:

    308041 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308041/) Advanced troubleshooting for general startup problems in Windows XP
    326841 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326841/) Support WebCast: Microsoft Windows XP: Troubleshooting Startup and Shutdown Problems
    307654 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307654/) How to install and use the Recovery Console in Windows XP
    Internet Explorer 7
    If you have Internet Explorer 7 installed on your computer, you must uninstall Internet Explorer 7 before you perform a repair install or in-place upgrade.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    917964 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917964/) How to perform a repair installation of Windows XP if Internet Explorer 7 is installed
    Data backup
    Before you reinstall Windows, back up all data. Determine the data that you want to back up. This data may include the following:? My Documents (documents, pictures, music, videos)
    ? Favorites
    ? Address books
    ? E-mail messages
    ? Document templates
    ? Macros
    ? Boilerplates
    Backup copies of your registry files (located in the %systemroot%\Repair folder) are replaced after an in-place upgrade is complete. The registry files in the Repair folder are either from the first time that you started Windows XP or the last time that you used the Backup utility to back up the system state. If you must use registry backups after the in-place upgrade is complete, copy these registry backups to another location before you perform an in-place upgrade.
    Windows Installation CD
    Before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade, have the Windows installation CD and the product key available. If you do not have the Windows installation CD and the product key available, you cannot reinstall Windows. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, contact the manufacturer of your computer for help in locating or obtaining the Windows installation files and your product key.
    Device drivers
    Many of the device drivers for your hardware components are integrated into Windows. However, devices such as printers, monitors, graphic cards, sound cards, modems, external drives, and scanners usually have separate installation CDs. If you do not have all of the drivers for your hardware components, you can download the drivers from the Internet and then write them to a CD.

    If your computer requires a third-party mass storage device driver or hardware abstraction layer (HAL), make sure that you have a copy of the files on a separate storage media before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade.
    Programs
    You should collect and store the CDs and product keys for your programs in an appropriate location so that you can reinstall the programs after you have reinstalled Windows. These programs may include the following:? Microsoft Office programs
    ? Antivirus software
    ? CD writing software
    ? Internet Provider software

    Network settings
    You can restore certain network settings after you reinstall Windows. If this step is required, record your computer's network settings. These settings include the following:? Computer name
    ? Workgroup or domain
    ? TCP/IP settings

    Internet provider information
    To make sure that you can reconnect to the Internet after you have reinstalled Windows, record your Internet provider information. This includes user name and password information.
    Startup sequence
    If it is required, adjust the BIOS startup sequence. The sequence should be in the following order:? CD drive
    ? Hard disk
    ? Floppy disk drive

    Windows XP preinstalled
    If your computer came preinstalled with Windows XP, before you follow the steps later in this article, view the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    312369 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312369/) You may lose data or program settings after reinstalling, repairing, or upgrading Windows XP
    Windows XP Service Pack 2
    If you have Windows XP Service Pack 2 installed on your computer, you must reinstall Service Pack 2 after you reinstall or repair Windows XP. To do this, see the appropriate method.

    Note Service packs are cumulative. Each new service pack contains all the fixes that are included with earlier service packs and any new fixes. You do not have to install an earlier version of a service pack before you install the latest version. For example, you only have to install Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), you do not have to install Windows XP Service Pack 1a (SP1a).? Method 1: Combine the Service Pack 2 files together with the Windows XP setup files
    Combine the Service Pack 2 files together with the Windows XP setup files.

    For more information about combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    894947 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894947/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 1: Introduction)
    894948 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894948/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 2: Copying the Windows CD to the hard disk)
    894949 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894949/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 3: Integrating Service Pack 2 in the Setup files)
    894950 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894950/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 4: Reading the boot image file)
    ? Method 2: Obtain the service pack CD and reinstall the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP
    To order Windows Service Pack 2 on CD, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx)
    ? Method 3: Download the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    322389 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322389/) How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack

    System Restore
    If you perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP, all existing restore points are removed and a new system checkpoint restore point is created after the in-place upgrade is complete. Do not perform an in-place upgrade if you may have to use System Restore to restore your computer to a previous state.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    301224 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301224/) System Restore "restore points" are missing or deleted
    Repair a component
    Do not perform a repair or in-place upgrade to repair a component or program that is currently not installed. If you have the necessary permissions, use the Add or Remove Programs item in Control Panel, or reinstall the component or program instead of Windows. To open Add or Remove Programs in Windows XP, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
    User account problem
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade to try to resolve a problem with a user account, password, or local profile. To determine whether the problem is related to a user account, password, or local profile, create another user account (if you have the required permissions), and then log on to that account to see whether the problem is resolved.

    For more information about creating a new user account in Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    279783 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/279783/) How to create and configure user accounts in Windows XP
    Third-party programs
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade to resolve a problem with third-party programs, files or registry entries. Contact the manufacturer of the third-party program to resolve any problems.
    Disk problems
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade if you suspect disk problems.

    For more information about checking for disk errors, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    315265 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315265/) How to perform disk error checking in Windows XP
    308041 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308041/) Advanced troubleshooting for general startup problems in Windows XP
    You can also contact the computer manufacturer for more information about how to troubleshooting hard disk problems.
    Third-party devices
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade if you suspect a problem with a third-party device. Determine whether the latest device drivers are currently installed for the device. Contact the manufacturer of the third-party device to resolve any problems.
    Back to the top

    Method 1: Reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP
    To reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP, follow these steps: 1. Start your computer.
    2. Insert the Windows XP CD in your computer's CD drive or DVD drive.
    3. On the Welcome to Windows XP page, click Install Windows XP.
    4. On the Welcome to Windows Setup page, click Upgrade (Recommended) in the Installation Type box (if it is not already selected), and then click Next.
    5. On the License Agreement page, click I accept this agreement, and then click Next.
    6. On the Your Product Key page, type the 25-character product key in the Product key boxes, and then click Next.
    7. On the Get Updated Setup Files page, select the option that you want, and then click Next.
    8. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP.

    Back to the top

    Method 2: Repair install of Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD
    To reinstall Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD, follow these steps: 1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your computer's CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.
    2. When the "Press any key to boot from CD" message appears on the screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.

    Note Your computer must be configured to start from the CD drive or DVD drive. For more information about how to configure your computer to start from the CD drive or DVD drive, see your computer's documentation or contact your computer manufacturer.
    3. You receive the following message on the Welcome to Setup screen that appears:
    This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft Windows XP to run on your computer:

    To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.

    To repair a Windows XP installation by using Recovery Console, press R.

    To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3.
    4. Press ENTER to set up Windows XP.
    5. On the Windows XP Licensing Agreement screen, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.
    6. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is selected in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.

    Note If Windows XP was preinstalled on your computer, and you do not have the Repair option, contact your computer manufacturer to make sure that you have the installation CD for a repair install.
    7. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP. After you repair Windows XP, you may have to reactivate your copy of Windows XP.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    310064 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310064/) How to troubleshoot Windows XP Setup problems when you upgrade from Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition

    Back to the top

    After you perform an in-place upgrade
    After you perform an in-place upgrade or repair installation, you must reinstall all updates to Windows. To reinstall Windows updates, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com (http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com)
    Reinstall all updates to Windows
    After you perform an in-place upgrade or repair installation, you must reinstall all updates to Windows. To reinstall Windows updates, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com (http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com)
    Reinstall Internet Explorer 7
    When Windows XP has been repaired and is running correctly, reinstall Internet Explorer 7. To reinstall Internet Explorer 7, you must have the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. This installation package may still be on the computer from the first time that you installed Internet Explorer 7. Locate the installation package in the folder in which you saved the files.

    Note This package may be located in the Temporary Internet Files folder. If you cannot locate the Internet Explorer 7 installation package, visit the following Microsoft Web site to obtain this package:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx)
    To connect to the Microsoft download site, you must have a functional Web browser. If Internet Explorer 6 does not work on the computer after you uninstall Internet Explorer 7, you cannot download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. Therefore, you will have to use a computer that has a functional Web browser to download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. Then, use a shared network drive to install the program from the downloaded installation package on this other computer onto the repaired computer. If you cannot use a shared network for this purpose, copy the Internet Explorer 7 installation package onto a CD on the second computer. Then, use this CD to install Internet Explorer 7 on the first computer.

    For more information about how to troubleshoot specific Windows XP Setup issues, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    312369 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312369/) You may lose data or program settings after reinstalling, repairing, or upgrading Windows XP
    312368 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312368/) Data loss occurs after you reinstall, repair, or upgrade Windows XP


    For more information about the Windows XP Setup program, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    286463 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/286463/) Release Notes for Windows XP Setup contained in the Pro.txt file
    306824 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306824/) Release Notes for Windows XP Setup contained in the Home.txt file
    286647 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/286647/) Windows XP Read1st.txt file contents


    Note If you still have problems performing an in-place upgrade of Windows XP, you can ask someone for help or contact support. For information about how to contact support, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://support.microsoft.com/contactus
    and available here

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

    But you really need to have the NB seen to.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    vikingwwa

    Thanks for this info. its very in depth, I was hoping to get around a reinstall, I didn't get a disk to do that when I bought the computer, and didn't make a back up, also I did have things I wanted to save before they are deleted, have you ever heard of a CAB install? I did that once through tec. support with my desk top that has windows millenium, and if I remember right it doesn't delete but replaces the missing files, but I also needed the disk which I don't have for this one, but can get it from gateway for a price.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Which is uncompressed and then used in the process for whatever it is being used for. Quite a lot of M$ programs have CAB files in them as it saves a lot of space on the HDD though it does slow down the process.

    Yep you are correct you do need the Recovery Disc and unfortunately here the ones that are supplied by places like Gateway can not be used to Repair the Install. They will format the drive destroying everything on it and return the system to As New.

    This saves the System Makers the problems with Software Conflicts that can occur so after using the Recovery Disc if the system still doesn't work they know that there is a problem which they are responsible for while it is UG at least.

    Some systems have a Hidden Partition on the HDD which can be used to rebuild the system to As New but these destroy the existing Data which the System Makers are not really concerned about anyway.

    Unfortunately here Gateway will supply a Slipstreamed Recovery Disc with all of the Drivers and Software that comes with the computer new but these can not be used to Repair the Existing Install. It does however make things considerably easier to install the System as you do not need to hunt around for Specialized drivers that are not included on the M$ Windows Install Disc.

    Of course the down side with the Hidden Partition on the HDD is that when the drive fails you no longer have the ability to reinstall the system. So you really need th Gateway Supplied Recovery Disc if you have not followed their directions and made your own. Even if you did make your own if they where not correctly stored they may not actually work when they are needed so a Manufactured Disc is always better as they are not as prone to Sun Damage as Recorded ones are.

    On the up side Gateway only want a small price for the Recovery Disc generally somewhere around the $20-30 mark where as a M$ OEM Disc for XP if you can still get them is around the $200.00 mark but these come with the New License to use them. Gateway get a discount from M$ on their Products so they have to support the Software and M$ isn't responsible for any problems that arise from the use of the software beyond supplying Fixes for Program Errors that where made.

    I hope that is of some help

    Col

    Duh edited to ad if you use a Boot Disc to open into DOS and look at the HDD any FAT32 Bit Partitions except for a very small one on the HDD will be the Hidden Partition. All HDD's do have a small Unallocated or FAT 32 Space for the Drive Map on them and this is a % of the actual HDD's size so a 8 MEG Space on a 80 GIG Drive will be the space set aside to tell the computer all about the HDD's Format Type and where to find the different things on it. A Partition of 500 MEG to 1 GIG will be the Hidden Partition on the Drive where the Recovery Files are stored.

  • +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    To grab your Gateway Recovery Disc and reinstall the System. Windows has somehow become corrupted and several important files are either missing or are corrupt.

    What is more of a worry is the fact that it will not work on Mains Power. The M'Board in this unit has to be faulty and needs repair/replacing depending on what is wrong. It is quite possible that this is the cause of the Problem here.

    Just a note of caution here if you have data on the HDD that you want to keep using the Recovery Disc will delete it so you need to remove the HDD fit it to a USB Caddy and plug this into another computer to save your Data before proceeding with repairing Windows.

    If you have access to a Install Disc made by M$ of the same version as your current OS you can maybe do a Repair Install but it has to be the same version of the OS to accept your Product Key. The directions for a Repair Install of XP are below

    How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
    View products that this article applies to.
    Article ID : 315341
    Last Review : January 28, 2008
    Revision : 5.2
    This article was previously published under Q315341
    On This Page

    INTRODUCTION

    MORE INFORMATION

    Before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade

    Troubleshooting

    Internet Explorer 7

    Data backup

    Windows Installation CD

    Device drivers

    Programs

    Network settings

    Internet provider information

    Startup sequence

    Windows XP preinstalled

    Windows XP Service Pack 2

    Method 1: Reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP

    Method 2: Repair install of Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD

    After you perform an in-place upgrade

    Reinstall all updates to Windows

    Reinstall Internet Explorer 7
    INTRODUCTION
    This article describes how to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP. This is also named a repair installation. It reinstalls Windows XP to the same folder. You may want to perform an in-place upgrade if your installation of Windows XP must be repaired. Such a repair installation may be required if one of the following conditions is true:? You cannot start Windows XP in safe mode.

    For more information about how to start your Windows XP-based computer in safe mode, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    315222 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222/) A description of the Safe Mode Boot options in Windows XP
    ? You cannot start Windows XP after you install a Microsoft software update.
    ? There is a registry problem that cannot be solved by using other tools such as System Restore.

    For more information about System Restore, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    306084 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306084/) How to restore the operating system to a previous state in Windows XP
    ? You must apply default (file and registry) permissions to your Windows XP installation. This condition occurs because of missing or damaged program files after you make changes or updates to your computer or programs.
    ? You must register COM components and Windows File Protection (WFP) files. This condition occurs because of missing or damaged system files.
    ? You must use the Windows Setup program to enumerate Plug and Play devices again. This includes the hardware abstraction layer (HAL).
    To reinstall Windows XP, use the appropriate method in the "More information" section.
    Back to the top

    MORE INFORMATION
    Note You may want to disconnect from the Internet during the installation. Disconnecting from the Internet during the installation helps protect you from malicious users. You may also want to enable the firewall in Internet Explorer.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    283673 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283673/) How to turn on or turn off the firewall in Windows XP
    Back to the top

    Before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade
    Review the following topics before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade of Windows XP.
    Troubleshooting
    If you feel comfortable troubleshooting, consider the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles before you perform a repair or an in-place upgrade:

    308041 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308041/) Advanced troubleshooting for general startup problems in Windows XP
    326841 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326841/) Support WebCast: Microsoft Windows XP: Troubleshooting Startup and Shutdown Problems
    307654 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307654/) How to install and use the Recovery Console in Windows XP
    Internet Explorer 7
    If you have Internet Explorer 7 installed on your computer, you must uninstall Internet Explorer 7 before you perform a repair install or in-place upgrade.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    917964 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917964/) How to perform a repair installation of Windows XP if Internet Explorer 7 is installed
    Data backup
    Before you reinstall Windows, back up all data. Determine the data that you want to back up. This data may include the following:? My Documents (documents, pictures, music, videos)
    ? Favorites
    ? Address books
    ? E-mail messages
    ? Document templates
    ? Macros
    ? Boilerplates
    Backup copies of your registry files (located in the %systemroot%\Repair folder) are replaced after an in-place upgrade is complete. The registry files in the Repair folder are either from the first time that you started Windows XP or the last time that you used the Backup utility to back up the system state. If you must use registry backups after the in-place upgrade is complete, copy these registry backups to another location before you perform an in-place upgrade.
    Windows Installation CD
    Before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade, have the Windows installation CD and the product key available. If you do not have the Windows installation CD and the product key available, you cannot reinstall Windows. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, contact the manufacturer of your computer for help in locating or obtaining the Windows installation files and your product key.
    Device drivers
    Many of the device drivers for your hardware components are integrated into Windows. However, devices such as printers, monitors, graphic cards, sound cards, modems, external drives, and scanners usually have separate installation CDs. If you do not have all of the drivers for your hardware components, you can download the drivers from the Internet and then write them to a CD.

    If your computer requires a third-party mass storage device driver or hardware abstraction layer (HAL), make sure that you have a copy of the files on a separate storage media before you perform a repair or in-place upgrade.
    Programs
    You should collect and store the CDs and product keys for your programs in an appropriate location so that you can reinstall the programs after you have reinstalled Windows. These programs may include the following:? Microsoft Office programs
    ? Antivirus software
    ? CD writing software
    ? Internet Provider software

    Network settings
    You can restore certain network settings after you reinstall Windows. If this step is required, record your computer's network settings. These settings include the following:? Computer name
    ? Workgroup or domain
    ? TCP/IP settings

    Internet provider information
    To make sure that you can reconnect to the Internet after you have reinstalled Windows, record your Internet provider information. This includes user name and password information.
    Startup sequence
    If it is required, adjust the BIOS startup sequence. The sequence should be in the following order:? CD drive
    ? Hard disk
    ? Floppy disk drive

    Windows XP preinstalled
    If your computer came preinstalled with Windows XP, before you follow the steps later in this article, view the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    312369 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312369/) You may lose data or program settings after reinstalling, repairing, or upgrading Windows XP
    Windows XP Service Pack 2
    If you have Windows XP Service Pack 2 installed on your computer, you must reinstall Service Pack 2 after you reinstall or repair Windows XP. To do this, see the appropriate method.

    Note Service packs are cumulative. Each new service pack contains all the fixes that are included with earlier service packs and any new fixes. You do not have to install an earlier version of a service pack before you install the latest version. For example, you only have to install Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), you do not have to install Windows XP Service Pack 1a (SP1a).? Method 1: Combine the Service Pack 2 files together with the Windows XP setup files
    Combine the Service Pack 2 files together with the Windows XP setup files.

    For more information about combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    894947 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894947/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 1: Introduction)
    894948 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894948/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 2: Copying the Windows CD to the hard disk)
    894949 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894949/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 3: Integrating Service Pack 2 in the Setup files)
    894950 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894950/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 4: Reading the boot image file)
    ? Method 2: Obtain the service pack CD and reinstall the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP
    To order Windows Service Pack 2 on CD, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx)
    ? Method 3: Download the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    322389 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322389/) How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack

    System Restore
    If you perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP, all existing restore points are removed and a new system checkpoint restore point is created after the in-place upgrade is complete. Do not perform an in-place upgrade if you may have to use System Restore to restore your computer to a previous state.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    301224 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301224/) System Restore "restore points" are missing or deleted
    Repair a component
    Do not perform a repair or in-place upgrade to repair a component or program that is currently not installed. If you have the necessary permissions, use the Add or Remove Programs item in Control Panel, or reinstall the component or program instead of Windows. To open Add or Remove Programs in Windows XP, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
    User account problem
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade to try to resolve a problem with a user account, password, or local profile. To determine whether the problem is related to a user account, password, or local profile, create another user account (if you have the required permissions), and then log on to that account to see whether the problem is resolved.

    For more information about creating a new user account in Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    279783 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/279783/) How to create and configure user accounts in Windows XP
    Third-party programs
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade to resolve a problem with third-party programs, files or registry entries. Contact the manufacturer of the third-party program to resolve any problems.
    Disk problems
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade if you suspect disk problems.

    For more information about checking for disk errors, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    315265 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315265/) How to perform disk error checking in Windows XP
    308041 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308041/) Advanced troubleshooting for general startup problems in Windows XP
    You can also contact the computer manufacturer for more information about how to troubleshooting hard disk problems.
    Third-party devices
    Do not use a repair or in-place upgrade if you suspect a problem with a third-party device. Determine whether the latest device drivers are currently installed for the device. Contact the manufacturer of the third-party device to resolve any problems.
    Back to the top

    Method 1: Reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP
    To reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP, follow these steps: 1. Start your computer.
    2. Insert the Windows XP CD in your computer's CD drive or DVD drive.
    3. On the Welcome to Windows XP page, click Install Windows XP.
    4. On the Welcome to Windows Setup page, click Upgrade (Recommended) in the Installation Type box (if it is not already selected), and then click Next.
    5. On the License Agreement page, click I accept this agreement, and then click Next.
    6. On the Your Product Key page, type the 25-character product key in the Product key boxes, and then click Next.
    7. On the Get Updated Setup Files page, select the option that you want, and then click Next.
    8. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP.

    Back to the top

    Method 2: Repair install of Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD
    To reinstall Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD, follow these steps: 1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your computer's CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.
    2. When the "Press any key to boot from CD" message appears on the screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.

    Note Your computer must be configured to start from the CD drive or DVD drive. For more information about how to configure your computer to start from the CD drive or DVD drive, see your computer's documentation or contact your computer manufacturer.
    3. You receive the following message on the Welcome to Setup screen that appears:
    This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft Windows XP to run on your computer:

    To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.

    To repair a Windows XP installation by using Recovery Console, press R.

    To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3.
    4. Press ENTER to set up Windows XP.
    5. On the Windows XP Licensing Agreement screen, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.
    6. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is selected in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.

    Note If Windows XP was preinstalled on your computer, and you do not have the Repair option, contact your computer manufacturer to make sure that you have the installation CD for a repair install.
    7. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP. After you repair Windows XP, you may have to reactivate your copy of Windows XP.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    310064 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310064/) How to troubleshoot Windows XP Setup problems when you upgrade from Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition

    Back to the top

    After you perform an in-place upgrade
    After you perform an in-place upgrade or repair installation, you must reinstall all updates to Windows. To reinstall Windows updates, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com (http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com)
    Reinstall all updates to Windows
    After you perform an in-place upgrade or repair installation, you must reinstall all updates to Windows. To reinstall Windows updates, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com (http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com)
    Reinstall Internet Explorer 7
    When Windows XP has been repaired and is running correctly, reinstall Internet Explorer 7. To reinstall Internet Explorer 7, you must have the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. This installation package may still be on the computer from the first time that you installed Internet Explorer 7. Locate the installation package in the folder in which you saved the files.

    Note This package may be located in the Temporary Internet Files folder. If you cannot locate the Internet Explorer 7 installation package, visit the following Microsoft Web site to obtain this package:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx)
    To connect to the Microsoft download site, you must have a functional Web browser. If Internet Explorer 6 does not work on the computer after you uninstall Internet Explorer 7, you cannot download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. Therefore, you will have to use a computer that has a functional Web browser to download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. Then, use a shared network drive to install the program from the downloaded installation package on this other computer onto the repaired computer. If you cannot use a shared network for this purpose, copy the Internet Explorer 7 installation package onto a CD on the second computer. Then, use this CD to install Internet Explorer 7 on the first computer.

    For more information about how to troubleshoot specific Windows XP Setup issues, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    312369 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312369/) You may lose data or program settings after reinstalling, repairing, or upgrading Windows XP
    312368 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312368/) Data loss occurs after you reinstall, repair, or upgrade Windows XP


    For more information about the Windows XP Setup program, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    286463 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/286463/) Release Notes for Windows XP Setup contained in the Pro.txt file
    306824 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306824/) Release Notes for Windows XP Setup contained in the Home.txt file
    286647 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/286647/) Windows XP Read1st.txt file contents


    Note If you still have problems performing an in-place upgrade of Windows XP, you can ask someone for help or contact support. For information about how to contact support, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://support.microsoft.com/contactus
    and available here

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

    But you really need to have the NB seen to.

    Col

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    0 Votes
    vikingwwa

    Thanks for this info. its very in depth, I was hoping to get around a reinstall, I didn't get a disk to do that when I bought the computer, and didn't make a back up, also I did have things I wanted to save before they are deleted, have you ever heard of a CAB install? I did that once through tec. support with my desk top that has windows millenium, and if I remember right it doesn't delete but replaces the missing files, but I also needed the disk which I don't have for this one, but can get it from gateway for a price.

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    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Which is uncompressed and then used in the process for whatever it is being used for. Quite a lot of M$ programs have CAB files in them as it saves a lot of space on the HDD though it does slow down the process.

    Yep you are correct you do need the Recovery Disc and unfortunately here the ones that are supplied by places like Gateway can not be used to Repair the Install. They will format the drive destroying everything on it and return the system to As New.

    This saves the System Makers the problems with Software Conflicts that can occur so after using the Recovery Disc if the system still doesn't work they know that there is a problem which they are responsible for while it is UG at least.

    Some systems have a Hidden Partition on the HDD which can be used to rebuild the system to As New but these destroy the existing Data which the System Makers are not really concerned about anyway.

    Unfortunately here Gateway will supply a Slipstreamed Recovery Disc with all of the Drivers and Software that comes with the computer new but these can not be used to Repair the Existing Install. It does however make things considerably easier to install the System as you do not need to hunt around for Specialized drivers that are not included on the M$ Windows Install Disc.

    Of course the down side with the Hidden Partition on the HDD is that when the drive fails you no longer have the ability to reinstall the system. So you really need th Gateway Supplied Recovery Disc if you have not followed their directions and made your own. Even if you did make your own if they where not correctly stored they may not actually work when they are needed so a Manufactured Disc is always better as they are not as prone to Sun Damage as Recorded ones are.

    On the up side Gateway only want a small price for the Recovery Disc generally somewhere around the $20-30 mark where as a M$ OEM Disc for XP if you can still get them is around the $200.00 mark but these come with the New License to use them. Gateway get a discount from M$ on their Products so they have to support the Software and M$ isn't responsible for any problems that arise from the use of the software beyond supplying Fixes for Program Errors that where made.

    I hope that is of some help

    Col

    Duh edited to ad if you use a Boot Disc to open into DOS and look at the HDD any FAT32 Bit Partitions except for a very small one on the HDD will be the Hidden Partition. All HDD's do have a small Unallocated or FAT 32 Space for the Drive Map on them and this is a % of the actual HDD's size so a 8 MEG Space on a 80 GIG Drive will be the space set aside to tell the computer all about the HDD's Format Type and where to find the different things on it. A Partition of 500 MEG to 1 GIG will be the Hidden Partition on the Drive where the Recovery Files are stored.