Questions

Ghost Driver?

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Ghost Driver?

Tyharo
I've ran across an article saying that removing ghost drivers increases your boot time and pc performance. I found a software (GhostBuster) that finds and allows you to remove all ghost drivers. Before I decide to clean my laptop of ghost driver, i need to know, is it safe to remove ghost driver? If I remove ghost drivers could it possible crew up my HDD's in raid 0 and other hardware controllers/ hardware installed on my laptop?
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    OH Smeg

    http://www.vistax64 .com/tutorials/163016-ghost-devices-drivers.html
    yep you know the drill about removing the space from between the domain name and the .whatever

    Yep I know it's supposed to be about Vista but the directions still apply to whatever Windows OS you are using.

    I personally wouldn't trust any software to do something as possibly devastating as this but do it manually but then again that's just me and I've had this OS giving me trouble after doing a M$ Survey where I couldn't get IE to stay open and no other browser allowed me to post a reply so maybe right at the moment I'm more cautious than normal.

    Col

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    TheChas

    Just a note here.

    Windows remembers every hardware device you have used with your computer.

    Yes, these "ghost" devices use a little space in the registry, but they don't really use system or hardware resources.

    There are also a few "System" devices that show up as ghost devices. These you either should not, or cannot remove.

    On a laptop, most of the "ghost" devices will be USB storage or other devices. If you remove the ghost device and then plug in the same device, Windows will take some time configuring the driver and setting up the registry settings.

    I use the manual "Remove Non-Present Devices" instructions from Microsoft when I need to clean up a system. This is usually a rack mount system with 10 or more plug-in cards that during software development and integration have had the cards moved around.

    If you want a fun day, spend time removing ghost COM ports and NICs so that you can assign the physical ports and cards to the correct resource descriptors.

    Chas

  • +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    http://www.vistax64 .com/tutorials/163016-ghost-devices-drivers.html
    yep you know the drill about removing the space from between the domain name and the .whatever

    Yep I know it's supposed to be about Vista but the directions still apply to whatever Windows OS you are using.

    I personally wouldn't trust any software to do something as possibly devastating as this but do it manually but then again that's just me and I've had this OS giving me trouble after doing a M$ Survey where I couldn't get IE to stay open and no other browser allowed me to post a reply so maybe right at the moment I'm more cautious than normal.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    Just a note here.

    Windows remembers every hardware device you have used with your computer.

    Yes, these "ghost" devices use a little space in the registry, but they don't really use system or hardware resources.

    There are also a few "System" devices that show up as ghost devices. These you either should not, or cannot remove.

    On a laptop, most of the "ghost" devices will be USB storage or other devices. If you remove the ghost device and then plug in the same device, Windows will take some time configuring the driver and setting up the registry settings.

    I use the manual "Remove Non-Present Devices" instructions from Microsoft when I need to clean up a system. This is usually a rack mount system with 10 or more plug-in cards that during software development and integration have had the cards moved around.

    If you want a fun day, spend time removing ghost COM ports and NICs so that you can assign the physical ports and cards to the correct resource descriptors.

    Chas