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Gigabit upgrade in progress... my FIOS router is 10/100... does it matter?

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Gigabit upgrade in progress... my FIOS router is 10/100... does it matter?

_kirkpatrick
I have verizon FIOS and the router is currently only 10/100. I have a 16 port switch running off that and an 8 port switch hanging off the 16. I am considering upgrading everything to be Gigabit to take advantage of faster internal speeds (I have a NAS that's gigabit capable).

I called Verizon and they don't have a gigabit version of my router just yet. My question: Does it matter if I'm looking to simply upgrade internal speeds or will my network be slow since the Verizon equip. acts as my DHCP and primary DNS resources.
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    robo_dev

    Don't confuse throughput with latency. Low-bandwidth things like DHCP address assignment will work at roughly the same speed whether your router had a 10Gigabit interface or a 10Mbit interface. On a local LAN, maximum latency is going to be typically like 1 or 2 ms, regardless of the wired interface speed.

    Once a workstation has an address, the speed of the DHCP server does not matter, and the DNS resolution only really matters for external host names, since there is no DNS server in a Windows workgroup.

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    Who Am I Really

    if anything in the layout is 10/100
    then you will be limited to 10/100

    ie. a 10/100 switch can't do gigabit
    a 10/100 NIC will limit all communications to that particular system to 10/100
    also all the CAT cabling must be CAT5e or better to do gigabit

    the router can be 10/100 as long as it's only handling DHCP and WAN communication

    if one or more systems are connected directly to the 10/100 router,
    then those systems will be limited to 10/100

    etc

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    robo_dev

    To clarify a bit.

    What the OP is asking is if he has a gigabit ethernet switch, and he uses his 10/100 router, will the whole LAN be slow?

    The answer is no, having a 10/100 switch does not matter one bit. LAN traffic between devices does not touch the router..it goes in one switch port and back out another port.

    Services such as DHCP are not traffic intensive, and will work fine on any network, as long as it is not overloaded. The DNS on the LAN does not matter, as Windows workgroups do their own DNS on the LAN.

    However, if his broadband connection were faster than the speed of the router interface, then it would matter, of course.

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    Who Am I Really

    RE: Gigabit

    the OP didn't specify whether his NICs, or switches were gigiabit
    he just said he had systems connected to switches
    that are connected to the 10/100 router

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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Don't confuse throughput with latency. Low-bandwidth things like DHCP address assignment will work at roughly the same speed whether your router had a 10Gigabit interface or a 10Mbit interface. On a local LAN, maximum latency is going to be typically like 1 or 2 ms, regardless of the wired interface speed.

    Once a workstation has an address, the speed of the DHCP server does not matter, and the DNS resolution only really matters for external host names, since there is no DNS server in a Windows workgroup.

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    0 Votes
    Who Am I Really

    if anything in the layout is 10/100
    then you will be limited to 10/100

    ie. a 10/100 switch can't do gigabit
    a 10/100 NIC will limit all communications to that particular system to 10/100
    also all the CAT cabling must be CAT5e or better to do gigabit

    the router can be 10/100 as long as it's only handling DHCP and WAN communication

    if one or more systems are connected directly to the 10/100 router,
    then those systems will be limited to 10/100

    etc

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    To clarify a bit.

    What the OP is asking is if he has a gigabit ethernet switch, and he uses his 10/100 router, will the whole LAN be slow?

    The answer is no, having a 10/100 switch does not matter one bit. LAN traffic between devices does not touch the router..it goes in one switch port and back out another port.

    Services such as DHCP are not traffic intensive, and will work fine on any network, as long as it is not overloaded. The DNS on the LAN does not matter, as Windows workgroups do their own DNS on the LAN.

    However, if his broadband connection were faster than the speed of the router interface, then it would matter, of course.

    +
    0 Votes
    Who Am I Really

    RE: Gigabit

    the OP didn't specify whether his NICs, or switches were gigiabit
    he just said he had systems connected to switches
    that are connected to the 10/100 router