Questions

How do I install mac OS 9 on a pc

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How do I install mac OS 9 on a pc

vosemeke
I've got a mac OS 9 cd and i have no clue ho to install in on my pc. I want to take out xp from my pc and replace it with the mac OS 9. i have 2 computer both with xp on them one of them have a pentium processor and the other have an AMD processor...any advice on how to install this mac OS 9 on these pcs will be greatly appreciated
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    ComputerCookie

    throw the MAC os 9 disk in the bin.

    Then go and buy a MAC!!

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    OH Smeg

    For Mass Market PC loading. OSX whatever is a propriety OS for Proprietary Hardware and not for the Mass Market.

    If you want to use the same system as the Mac's do you can install Open BSD which is what OSX is built on but it will not have the eye candy that OZX has.

    You can download a copy of Open BSD free from here

    http://tinyurl.com/ynl5sx

    Col

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    1 Votes
    eddie chou

    I have the same issue and don't need the snide answers. How is it done??!! I'm not throwing my OS 9 or any other disk away and the question is about OS 9 and not OS-X whatever animal flavor it is. Naturally enough I want to run some old and excellent Mac programs that run on OS 9 which is not similar in any way to Open BSD - We are not asking to run the same system Macs are on - this is the old system and has very little in common with OS-X except the Mac name. Please, if you don't have a working answer for the question as asked, don't waste our time by posting.

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    0 Votes

    Don't waste our time posting to 4 year old questions that have
    been answered. Apple's EULA prohibits installing OS9 on non-
    Apple hardware.

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    jsargent

    Never mind the trolls. But you can find more information through Google than here.

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    docsteely

    Sheepshaver is the only emulator for PC that actually works with Mac OS 9. As for replacing your primary system on a PC with Mac OS 9, you cannot because the architecture is different (OS9 was made for PowerPC processors, not x86).

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    1 Votes
    rodney.heathcott

    Sheepshaver or Basilisk will work for emulation, but you can't have OS9 as your primary OS. Sorry.

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    1 Votes
    jsargent

    You need to look up on Google with the phrase "Hackintosh". As far as I know most people are using OSX Snow Leopard. You need to check on the forums if your hardware is supported for this work. Most use Gigabyte motherboards which have UEFI bios. If you don't have UEFI bios then you probably won't be able to use OSX. HTH.

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    jsargent

    If your hardware is not supported then you could also use VirtualBox to act as a virtual machine to host the MacOS. However, you need to make sure that your hardware has enough processing power for that. You can find many source by looking for MacOS on VirtualBox as search terms on Google. There are also many sources with videos showing you how to do it.

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    1 Votes
    Systems Guy

    "If you have any trouble sounding condescending, find a Unix user to show you how it's done." And apparently some Mac users as well.
    Sincerely, good luck with your project.

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    1 Votes
    chris.leeworthy

    Eddie, I'm afraid "You can't" isn't a snide answer.

    The problem is that OS 9 was actually written for PowerPC processors not Intel it just won't run natively or in virtual on PC's.

    As Rodney pointed out the best you could do with OS 9 is run it in an emulator like sheepshaver or Basilisk though looking at those solutions they have some limitations too. Sheepshaver only appears to be available for Linux or BeOS (people still have that?). Basilisk probably won't do the job at all as it only seems to be compatible with MacOS up to version 8.1.

    Later versions of Mac OS X are different as they have been written to work on intel computers and so the Hackintosh or virtualisation routes may work for them.

    Finally I must be a bit stuffy and point out that running a mac operating system on anything other than a mac *is* prohibited in the Apple end user license agreement so if you choose to do so it's your own responsibility.

    Hope this is a more helpful answer.

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    0 Votes
    Tea.Rollins

    start -> run -> cmd
    type "format c:"
    enter
    type "y"
    enter

    Done

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    5 Votes
    kkramar17

    OS 9 was written to execute on PowerPC processors. Even when OS X 10.2x thru 10.4x ran the "classic" environment (supporting PPC apps written for OS 8 & 9), it was essentially an emulation of the old Motorola hardware environment. Apple dropped "classic" support three OS versions ago.

    Rosetta was a little different, in that it was a support library for PPC apps written for the newer OS X, translating the PPC calls to their Intel equivalents to work on Intel processors.

    The primary difference between emulation and virtualization is that most virtual environments (Parallels, VMware, etc) are able to execute their instructions directly on the host processor, inside a sandboxed set of threads. BTW, Apple's BootCamp environment isn't virtualization: the Intel Macs can legitimately run Windows written for Intel processors as a primary OS.

    If you can't run the instructions directly on the host processor, then you need to use an emulator which builds a software reconstruction of a processor and a motherboard. Emulation is calculation intensive and generally slower than virtualization, since each instruction has to be run through the emulated processor, which then has to be run through the rel) processor, and then back out the same way.

    Drivers can be an issue for both virtual and emulated environments, so you have to see what does and doesn't work, and then more research.

    You might want to check out the emulator zone, they have a couple of Mac OS PPC emulators there... PearPC (noted above), Mini vMac. They'll probably run slowly, though.

    http://www.emulator-zone.com/doc.php/computer/

    Good Luck!

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    0 Votes
    ComputerCookie

    throw the MAC os 9 disk in the bin.

    Then go and buy a MAC!!

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    For Mass Market PC loading. OSX whatever is a propriety OS for Proprietary Hardware and not for the Mass Market.

    If you want to use the same system as the Mac's do you can install Open BSD which is what OSX is built on but it will not have the eye candy that OZX has.

    You can download a copy of Open BSD free from here

    http://tinyurl.com/ynl5sx

    Col

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    1 Votes
    eddie chou

    I have the same issue and don't need the snide answers. How is it done??!! I'm not throwing my OS 9 or any other disk away and the question is about OS 9 and not OS-X whatever animal flavor it is. Naturally enough I want to run some old and excellent Mac programs that run on OS 9 which is not similar in any way to Open BSD - We are not asking to run the same system Macs are on - this is the old system and has very little in common with OS-X except the Mac name. Please, if you don't have a working answer for the question as asked, don't waste our time by posting.

    +
    0 Votes

    Don't waste our time posting to 4 year old questions that have
    been answered. Apple's EULA prohibits installing OS9 on non-
    Apple hardware.

    +
    0 Votes
    jsargent

    Never mind the trolls. But you can find more information through Google than here.

    +
    0 Votes
    docsteely

    Sheepshaver is the only emulator for PC that actually works with Mac OS 9. As for replacing your primary system on a PC with Mac OS 9, you cannot because the architecture is different (OS9 was made for PowerPC processors, not x86).

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    1 Votes
    rodney.heathcott

    Sheepshaver or Basilisk will work for emulation, but you can't have OS9 as your primary OS. Sorry.

    +
    1 Votes
    jsargent

    You need to look up on Google with the phrase "Hackintosh". As far as I know most people are using OSX Snow Leopard. You need to check on the forums if your hardware is supported for this work. Most use Gigabyte motherboards which have UEFI bios. If you don't have UEFI bios then you probably won't be able to use OSX. HTH.

    +
    0 Votes
    jsargent

    If your hardware is not supported then you could also use VirtualBox to act as a virtual machine to host the MacOS. However, you need to make sure that your hardware has enough processing power for that. You can find many source by looking for MacOS on VirtualBox as search terms on Google. There are also many sources with videos showing you how to do it.

    +
    1 Votes
    Systems Guy

    "If you have any trouble sounding condescending, find a Unix user to show you how it's done." And apparently some Mac users as well.
    Sincerely, good luck with your project.

    +
    1 Votes
    chris.leeworthy

    Eddie, I'm afraid "You can't" isn't a snide answer.

    The problem is that OS 9 was actually written for PowerPC processors not Intel it just won't run natively or in virtual on PC's.

    As Rodney pointed out the best you could do with OS 9 is run it in an emulator like sheepshaver or Basilisk though looking at those solutions they have some limitations too. Sheepshaver only appears to be available for Linux or BeOS (people still have that?). Basilisk probably won't do the job at all as it only seems to be compatible with MacOS up to version 8.1.

    Later versions of Mac OS X are different as they have been written to work on intel computers and so the Hackintosh or virtualisation routes may work for them.

    Finally I must be a bit stuffy and point out that running a mac operating system on anything other than a mac *is* prohibited in the Apple end user license agreement so if you choose to do so it's your own responsibility.

    Hope this is a more helpful answer.

    +
    0 Votes
    Tea.Rollins

    start -> run -> cmd
    type "format c:"
    enter
    type "y"
    enter

    Done

    +
    5 Votes
    kkramar17

    OS 9 was written to execute on PowerPC processors. Even when OS X 10.2x thru 10.4x ran the "classic" environment (supporting PPC apps written for OS 8 & 9), it was essentially an emulation of the old Motorola hardware environment. Apple dropped "classic" support three OS versions ago.

    Rosetta was a little different, in that it was a support library for PPC apps written for the newer OS X, translating the PPC calls to their Intel equivalents to work on Intel processors.

    The primary difference between emulation and virtualization is that most virtual environments (Parallels, VMware, etc) are able to execute their instructions directly on the host processor, inside a sandboxed set of threads. BTW, Apple's BootCamp environment isn't virtualization: the Intel Macs can legitimately run Windows written for Intel processors as a primary OS.

    If you can't run the instructions directly on the host processor, then you need to use an emulator which builds a software reconstruction of a processor and a motherboard. Emulation is calculation intensive and generally slower than virtualization, since each instruction has to be run through the emulated processor, which then has to be run through the rel) processor, and then back out the same way.

    Drivers can be an issue for both virtual and emulated environments, so you have to see what does and doesn't work, and then more research.

    You might want to check out the emulator zone, they have a couple of Mac OS PPC emulators there... PearPC (noted above), Mini vMac. They'll probably run slowly, though.

    http://www.emulator-zone.com/doc.php/computer/

    Good Luck!