Questions

How many certs are too many?

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How many certs are too many?

surfrider26
I am a recently laid off Sys Admin guy.

I was with my previous company for close to 9 years, so needless to say I am seeing that my certs need some updating and upgrading.

What I wanted to find out was if there are any disadvantages to having TOO many certs when apply for work?

Currently I have
MCSE, MCSA, MCP, Sec+

I am currently working on MCTS: Exchange 2010 and will then be working on my MCTS for SQL 2008 (both of which seem to be the highest in demand during job searches)

After which I plan on getting VMWare Professional and and possibly PMP (really high demand from what I read moving into the future)

But as a manager, would you shy away from my if I had 7+ certifications?
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    OH Smeg

    That where directly applicable to the job you are applying for. If you come across as having too much knowledge that is a reason not to employ you for most positions as you know more than what was being advertised and you will move on as soon as something comes up. In the Hiring Persons Opinion at least.

    You don't want to give them any excuses not to hire you. Of course if like me you have a PhD in Electronic Engineering with a specialization on Computer Electronics and they know it you are well and truly up against things before you start. I've heard expressions like He knows more than I do and could do my job with both hands tied behind his back and that was just when I was consulting and sorting out their problems.

    Also before applying for anything check out the company involved they will not hesitate wasting your time and effort but you don't need to help them consume your valuable time.

    Col

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    cmiller5400

    If my memory serves me correctly, if you are an MCSE, technically you hold a MCP and a MCSA as well. Only list the MCSE, unless you hold a MCP in a different category than the MCSE/A. Likewise on any Cisco certs, A CCNA is a step up from a CCENT.

    It has always bugged me that some people will list everything. besides it gets confusing after a few:

    Joe Schmoe, PhD, MD, DMD, DVM, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, A+, CCNA, CCENT, MCDST, Net+, CNST, blah, blah, blah

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    info

    Don't know if you'll see this, but an addendum to your post would be, 'List the MCP if that's what is ASKED for...' When I was doing a contract job at a local hospital, I was in HR doing some work when I noticed a resume that was 'thrown out' for an IT job. I asked the woman why she had discarded the resume and she answered, "The position asked for an MCP. They didn't list that on their resume." I replied, "But they DO list an MCSE. That's a combination of FOUR MCP's." She just looked at me, shrugged her shoulders, and kept working...

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    robo_dev

    From a presentation standpoint, I do think it's annoying if somebody pastes all 20 of their certs at the same level as their name...it's like, yeah, we get it, you got lots of certs.

    Personally I have a lot of certs that need CPEs to keep current, than THAT is a royal pain!

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    Seonix

    I'd have to strongly disagree with robo_dev here. I think generally and employer is going to look for certs that they've asked for, and maybe a couple of sweetners to the deal like a CAPM or PMP etc.
    As mentioned by cmiller, if you have the MCSE, you really don't have the MCSA or MCP because they the MCSE is all these rolled up.
    If an employer sees a mountain of certs they will think any of, or a combination of the following:
    - Technically skilled
    - Won't stick around long/will ask for payrises regularly
    - Book smart but do they have the real-world know how?
    - Clients would be impressed by the number of certs.

    There are many, many instances of people being knocked back for jobs because they are over-qualified. I've beat guys to a job with one cert and they've had 5+ because I have demonstrated and proven professional experience, not just the ability to pass an exam.

    Personally I'd get only the ones you believe you will NEED in order to get the job you want. Currently you really only have MCSE, which is very valuable, and Sec+. VMWare wouldn't hurt but I wouldn't go for PMP. Needless to say, you need to be working as a full time PM for 5 years before PMI will accept you to do the exam.

  • +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    That where directly applicable to the job you are applying for. If you come across as having too much knowledge that is a reason not to employ you for most positions as you know more than what was being advertised and you will move on as soon as something comes up. In the Hiring Persons Opinion at least.

    You don't want to give them any excuses not to hire you. Of course if like me you have a PhD in Electronic Engineering with a specialization on Computer Electronics and they know it you are well and truly up against things before you start. I've heard expressions like He knows more than I do and could do my job with both hands tied behind his back and that was just when I was consulting and sorting out their problems.

    Also before applying for anything check out the company involved they will not hesitate wasting your time and effort but you don't need to help them consume your valuable time.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    cmiller5400

    If my memory serves me correctly, if you are an MCSE, technically you hold a MCP and a MCSA as well. Only list the MCSE, unless you hold a MCP in a different category than the MCSE/A. Likewise on any Cisco certs, A CCNA is a step up from a CCENT.

    It has always bugged me that some people will list everything. besides it gets confusing after a few:

    Joe Schmoe, PhD, MD, DMD, DVM, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, A+, CCNA, CCENT, MCDST, Net+, CNST, blah, blah, blah

    +
    0 Votes
    info

    Don't know if you'll see this, but an addendum to your post would be, 'List the MCP if that's what is ASKED for...' When I was doing a contract job at a local hospital, I was in HR doing some work when I noticed a resume that was 'thrown out' for an IT job. I asked the woman why she had discarded the resume and she answered, "The position asked for an MCP. They didn't list that on their resume." I replied, "But they DO list an MCSE. That's a combination of FOUR MCP's." She just looked at me, shrugged her shoulders, and kept working...

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    From a presentation standpoint, I do think it's annoying if somebody pastes all 20 of their certs at the same level as their name...it's like, yeah, we get it, you got lots of certs.

    Personally I have a lot of certs that need CPEs to keep current, than THAT is a royal pain!

    +
    0 Votes
    Seonix

    I'd have to strongly disagree with robo_dev here. I think generally and employer is going to look for certs that they've asked for, and maybe a couple of sweetners to the deal like a CAPM or PMP etc.
    As mentioned by cmiller, if you have the MCSE, you really don't have the MCSA or MCP because they the MCSE is all these rolled up.
    If an employer sees a mountain of certs they will think any of, or a combination of the following:
    - Technically skilled
    - Won't stick around long/will ask for payrises regularly
    - Book smart but do they have the real-world know how?
    - Clients would be impressed by the number of certs.

    There are many, many instances of people being knocked back for jobs because they are over-qualified. I've beat guys to a job with one cert and they've had 5+ because I have demonstrated and proven professional experience, not just the ability to pass an exam.

    Personally I'd get only the ones you believe you will NEED in order to get the job you want. Currently you really only have MCSE, which is very valuable, and Sec+. VMWare wouldn't hurt but I wouldn't go for PMP. Needless to say, you need to be working as a full time PM for 5 years before PMI will accept you to do the exam.