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How to Access IP Cam Through Router?

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How to Access IP Cam Through Router?

aljon
Have a wireless IP Wireless Camera (EasyN FS-613B). Trying to access it through a DLink DIR-615 router. Used the included setup software to identify the cam after following the setup procedure by connecting it to the router via a LAN cable. The software identified the unit with IP address, HTTP Port, Access IP (same as identified IP address) and I tried to access the cam using the IP address the software identified (192.168.1.216:81) but my browser cannot access it to go through the next step in the setup. process to access it via the Internet. Tried this operation with two networked computers with same outcome. I even tried to get the supplied cam setup software "wizard" to gain access but it indicates inability to access with words:"The IP Camera cannot be accessed" and "Please check the Internet"! I tried to play with the router port forwarding table putting in the identified camera IP address along with port 81 and several other things but still can not gain access to the camera using the "identified" IP addresses so I can do the next steps to configure the camera so i can "see" it on the (external) Internet. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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    Rob Kuhn

    I just set one of these (or rathter same make, different model) up earlier this week in the office. The setup software that came with it didn't find the cam until I did a hard reset and then the setup software was able to detect it.

    Anyway, you shouldn't have to play with port forwarding unless it's on a different subnet, VLAN, etc.

    I assume that the computers that you are trying to access the cam with the web browser are also on the same subnet?

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    aljon

    First, yes, both computer and camera are on the same network (both plugged into same router).

    The setup software detects and identifies the IP address, etc, of the cam OK. It is here the problem occurs: putting the detected IP address into the browser gets me nowhere (times out attempting to connect) so I can't gain access! I cannot gain access to it to log-in and make the necessary changes to the IP so I can see the camera over the Internet. I also used the setup wizard to gain access with same result. I tried "pinging" in DOS window, getting a response but after the addresses' IP, I seem get the DNS IP address which tells me I'm pinging it rather than the indicated IP address of the camera (result: pinging 192.168.1.126:81 (20869.32.145) with 32 bytes of data:....).

    I;m now thinking that I should setup a different router (I have several spares) to see if the same (negative) action occurs. Then I might consider that the router is OK but the new camera has a problem and needs to be returned for another.

    Since you setup a camera yourself, any other suggestions you might offer before I take my router out of the equation?

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    Deadly Ernest

    all your network and subnet setting on the PC and the router, especially the subnet mask. I mention this because I once had to fix a similar type issue with someone else's PC and the problem was one of the subnet masks was set for a 16 IP subnet and the new unit was outside that limited subnet - once I reset the system to use the whole 192.168.0.xxx subnet it was all OK.

    I've also seen people with one device on the subnet 192.168.0.xxx and another on 192.168.1.xxx and not pick up the difference in the third spot from 0 to 1 when checking the settings.

    I take you can't access the camera direct from the PC to check if it IS the router causing the problem.

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    mauche

    - Wireless router must ne setup on a Public IP Address provided by Service provider.
    - Assign a static Ip address for your CAM on the LAN (192.168.0.X), Set the default gateway IP address for the CAM(i.e the network IP address of the Wireless router)
    - Log-in to the wireless router, reserve the static IP address of the CAM on the wireless router
    - Set the CAM IP address as on Virtual Server,Change the public and private ports to an unassigned port number, Set Protocol = Both,Inbound filter = Allow all
    - Go to Advanced Tab, Select Firewall Settings, scroll down to DMS Host, Enable DMZ Host and set the CAM IP Address on the DMZ IP Address
    -Save settings and restart the wireless Router.

    You will be able to access the CAM if within your wireless Network using the static IP address; but to access it externally (remotely), use the public IP address of the wireless router.

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    Rob Kuhn

    It is possible that you could have a rule/policy/ACL/route in the router that is preventing you from connecting to the cam.

    It could be a submask issue too as "Deadly Ernest" mentioned. The reason I suspect that could be the case is because when you ping the cam you are getting an external IP address.

    Are you able to ping anything else that is plugged into this router? Are you running any sort of firewall on your computer?

    Have you also tried resetting the cam and starting over? That's what I had to do with mine initially.

    if you can afford it, can you reset the router back to factory/default? Or use another router?

    It is possible that you have a bad camera too or rather a cam with a buggered up config.

    One thing you can try is to take the cam home and try and get it working on your home network. If you can connect and configure it on your home network then you can start to look closer at your work(?) network. Unless this is being setup for home use then forget this step. :)

    HTH ...

  • +
    0 Votes
    Rob Kuhn

    I just set one of these (or rathter same make, different model) up earlier this week in the office. The setup software that came with it didn't find the cam until I did a hard reset and then the setup software was able to detect it.

    Anyway, you shouldn't have to play with port forwarding unless it's on a different subnet, VLAN, etc.

    I assume that the computers that you are trying to access the cam with the web browser are also on the same subnet?

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    0 Votes
    aljon

    First, yes, both computer and camera are on the same network (both plugged into same router).

    The setup software detects and identifies the IP address, etc, of the cam OK. It is here the problem occurs: putting the detected IP address into the browser gets me nowhere (times out attempting to connect) so I can't gain access! I cannot gain access to it to log-in and make the necessary changes to the IP so I can see the camera over the Internet. I also used the setup wizard to gain access with same result. I tried "pinging" in DOS window, getting a response but after the addresses' IP, I seem get the DNS IP address which tells me I'm pinging it rather than the indicated IP address of the camera (result: pinging 192.168.1.126:81 (20869.32.145) with 32 bytes of data:....).

    I;m now thinking that I should setup a different router (I have several spares) to see if the same (negative) action occurs. Then I might consider that the router is OK but the new camera has a problem and needs to be returned for another.

    Since you setup a camera yourself, any other suggestions you might offer before I take my router out of the equation?

    +
    0 Votes
    Deadly Ernest

    all your network and subnet setting on the PC and the router, especially the subnet mask. I mention this because I once had to fix a similar type issue with someone else's PC and the problem was one of the subnet masks was set for a 16 IP subnet and the new unit was outside that limited subnet - once I reset the system to use the whole 192.168.0.xxx subnet it was all OK.

    I've also seen people with one device on the subnet 192.168.0.xxx and another on 192.168.1.xxx and not pick up the difference in the third spot from 0 to 1 when checking the settings.

    I take you can't access the camera direct from the PC to check if it IS the router causing the problem.

    +
    0 Votes
    mauche

    - Wireless router must ne setup on a Public IP Address provided by Service provider.
    - Assign a static Ip address for your CAM on the LAN (192.168.0.X), Set the default gateway IP address for the CAM(i.e the network IP address of the Wireless router)
    - Log-in to the wireless router, reserve the static IP address of the CAM on the wireless router
    - Set the CAM IP address as on Virtual Server,Change the public and private ports to an unassigned port number, Set Protocol = Both,Inbound filter = Allow all
    - Go to Advanced Tab, Select Firewall Settings, scroll down to DMS Host, Enable DMZ Host and set the CAM IP Address on the DMZ IP Address
    -Save settings and restart the wireless Router.

    You will be able to access the CAM if within your wireless Network using the static IP address; but to access it externally (remotely), use the public IP address of the wireless router.

    +
    0 Votes
    Rob Kuhn

    It is possible that you could have a rule/policy/ACL/route in the router that is preventing you from connecting to the cam.

    It could be a submask issue too as "Deadly Ernest" mentioned. The reason I suspect that could be the case is because when you ping the cam you are getting an external IP address.

    Are you able to ping anything else that is plugged into this router? Are you running any sort of firewall on your computer?

    Have you also tried resetting the cam and starting over? That's what I had to do with mine initially.

    if you can afford it, can you reset the router back to factory/default? Or use another router?

    It is possible that you have a bad camera too or rather a cam with a buggered up config.

    One thing you can try is to take the cam home and try and get it working on your home network. If you can connect and configure it on your home network then you can start to look closer at your work(?) network. Unless this is being setup for home use then forget this step. :)

    HTH ...