Questions

How to connect two network through two LAN cards?

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0 Votes
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How to connect two network through two LAN cards?

Mhdshrestha
Hi,
I have two network having 0.5 MB and 1 MB speed. Both of this connections is connected through two different Router and then two LAN card in my computer. From first network i used to upload and from second i used it for general purpose (Open sites, download and other). But my problem is that i can not use both of network at a once if i try it both of two did not worked. To work a network properly i should disable another network. Please help me how can i work both at a once?
Thank you....

Clarifications

Muswe

Hi Mhdshrestha,

"But my problem is that i can not use both of network at a once if i try it both of two did not worked. To work a network properly i should disable another network" by this You mean that you cannot use two internet links at once??

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    1 Votes
    bulletnel19

    Have tried to bridge the 2 connections ?and what windows are you running ?

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    robo_dev

    First of all, do you have DHCP configured in both Routers?

    Are the two routers set for same IP address?

    Bridging does not apply in this case.

    If you have two routers going to two ISPs, or even two routers going to the same ISP, you cannot aggregate the bandwidth of the two devices by connecting them to the same LAN.

    TCP/IP, for most common applications, such as a web browser, requires ONE route to be active at a time, so making two network connections to two different routers forces Windows to choose the faster link (routing metric) and therefore establishes the default route to that faster connection, and disables the second one.

    What you need is a dual-wan router which allows the LAN to have access to a primary and failover ISP connection (failover), as well as direct certain users to a less lightly loaded WAN connection (load balancing).

    Of course, if you go to all the trouble and cost of a multi-wan router, why not just buy a faster link in the first place?

    It's not possible to do link aggregation between multiple ISPs, since it's not possible for normal TCP/IP connections to follow multiple paths with different routes back to your workstation. While it's true that certain applications such as Torrent apps can use multiple paths, they do this by establishing multiple connections. But I digress...

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    johndoe1400

    robo_dev "Of course, if you go to all the trouble and cost of a multi-wan router, why not just buy a faster link in the first place? "

    The reason most people have 2 different ISP connections is more to do with connectivity to the internet - rather than speed.

    I too have a similar problem and use a program called Octopus+ which does help in bonding the 2 ISPs, ..... somewhat.

    HTH

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    johndoe1400

    EDIT "The reason most people have 2 different ISP connections is more to do with having failsafe connectivity to the internet - in case 1 of the ISPs is down - rather than speed.

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    1 Votes
    kevin

    What you are attempting to accomplish is called aggregation and YES you can combine multiple ISPs. There are commercially available 'appliances' that do this and are very expensive. AT&T Wireless Services provide this function for all Hilton Hotel properties.
    Multiple Cable feeds, DSL and T1s can all be combined so that if one ISP fails the end-user will never see a broken connection.
    There is software you can download and install on PC that will accomplish this.
    You will need to have one ethernet card for each ISP plus one ethernet card to connect back into your local LAN. Effectively you will eliminate the DHCP services offered by any other routers in your LAN, since this 'appliance' will need to be providing this service for all connected system that you wish to offer aggregated band-width to.

  • +
    1 Votes
    bulletnel19

    Have tried to bridge the 2 connections ?and what windows are you running ?

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    First of all, do you have DHCP configured in both Routers?

    Are the two routers set for same IP address?

    Bridging does not apply in this case.

    If you have two routers going to two ISPs, or even two routers going to the same ISP, you cannot aggregate the bandwidth of the two devices by connecting them to the same LAN.

    TCP/IP, for most common applications, such as a web browser, requires ONE route to be active at a time, so making two network connections to two different routers forces Windows to choose the faster link (routing metric) and therefore establishes the default route to that faster connection, and disables the second one.

    What you need is a dual-wan router which allows the LAN to have access to a primary and failover ISP connection (failover), as well as direct certain users to a less lightly loaded WAN connection (load balancing).

    Of course, if you go to all the trouble and cost of a multi-wan router, why not just buy a faster link in the first place?

    It's not possible to do link aggregation between multiple ISPs, since it's not possible for normal TCP/IP connections to follow multiple paths with different routes back to your workstation. While it's true that certain applications such as Torrent apps can use multiple paths, they do this by establishing multiple connections. But I digress...

    +
    0 Votes
    johndoe1400

    robo_dev "Of course, if you go to all the trouble and cost of a multi-wan router, why not just buy a faster link in the first place? "

    The reason most people have 2 different ISP connections is more to do with connectivity to the internet - rather than speed.

    I too have a similar problem and use a program called Octopus+ which does help in bonding the 2 ISPs, ..... somewhat.

    HTH

    +
    0 Votes
    johndoe1400

    EDIT "The reason most people have 2 different ISP connections is more to do with having failsafe connectivity to the internet - in case 1 of the ISPs is down - rather than speed.

    +
    1 Votes
    kevin

    What you are attempting to accomplish is called aggregation and YES you can combine multiple ISPs. There are commercially available 'appliances' that do this and are very expensive. AT&T Wireless Services provide this function for all Hilton Hotel properties.
    Multiple Cable feeds, DSL and T1s can all be combined so that if one ISP fails the end-user will never see a broken connection.
    There is software you can download and install on PC that will accomplish this.
    You will need to have one ethernet card for each ISP plus one ethernet card to connect back into your local LAN. Effectively you will eliminate the DHCP services offered by any other routers in your LAN, since this 'appliance' will need to be providing this service for all connected system that you wish to offer aggregated band-width to.