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how to derive the specific ip of a host based on a given network address?

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how to derive the specific ip of a host based on a given network address?

lancepochacco
the question goes this way:
1 pc is connected to a router with the router's network address of 192.168.1.158/28.What is then the ip address that should be given to a pc or host?hera are the choices:
192.168.1.143/28
192.168.1.144/28
192.168.1.145/28
192.168.1.160/28

i need a brief explanation please help!

regards,
jeff
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    OldER Mycroft

    But I don't see a question here.

    What you are presenting is like having 4 mugs of coffee - which one would YOU drink first and why?

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    nepenthe0

    Microsoft's Internet Connection Sharing system and the popular devices called residential gateways or connection sharing routers use Network Address Translation to carry out all Internet connectons using one public IP address. The computer or device running the NAT service mediates all connections between computers on your LAN and the Internet.

    To explain NAT, it's helpful to make an analogy to postal mail service. Normally, mail is delivered to each house according to its address, and the mail delivery person stops at each separate house on a given block. This is analogous to routed Internet service where each of your computers has its own public IP address. Data is routed to your LAN, and then delivered to each computer independently.

    NAT works more like a large commercial office building, where there's one address for many people. Mail is delivered to the mail room, which sorts it out and delivers it internally to the correct recipient. With NAT, you are assigned one public IP address, and all communications between your LAN and the Internet use this address. The NAT service takes care of changing or translating the IP addresses in data packets from the private, internal IP addresses used on your LAN to the one public address used on the Internet.

    Robert Cowart, Brian Knittel, Using Windows XP Professional (Que Publishing, 3rd ed., 2005), ch. 19, p. 742

    Rick/Portland, OR

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    Jellimonsta

    I would recommend downloading Solarwinds Subnet Calculator (it can be downloaded for free).
    http://www.solarwinds.com/register/MoreSoftware.aspx?Program=92

    Those addresses look suspect unless the router has the last available IP in the range. With a /28 network a correct subnet would be 192.168.1.144 255.255.255.240.
    That would give you a host range of 192.168.1.145- 192.168.1.158. The first and last address in a network are never used as the first .144 is for 'the wire' and the last, .159 is for broadcast messages.
    So, in principal, if .158 is the last IP in that range, then the other hosts on that network have to fall between .145 and .157.
    Which one is that then?

    Edited to add: You may notice most TR folk do not like helping with 'homework'. You could have most likely googled for this answer yourself, and that is what they are trying to instill.

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    OldER Mycroft

    But I don't see a question here.

    What you are presenting is like having 4 mugs of coffee - which one would YOU drink first and why?

    +
    0 Votes
    nepenthe0

    Microsoft's Internet Connection Sharing system and the popular devices called residential gateways or connection sharing routers use Network Address Translation to carry out all Internet connectons using one public IP address. The computer or device running the NAT service mediates all connections between computers on your LAN and the Internet.

    To explain NAT, it's helpful to make an analogy to postal mail service. Normally, mail is delivered to each house according to its address, and the mail delivery person stops at each separate house on a given block. This is analogous to routed Internet service where each of your computers has its own public IP address. Data is routed to your LAN, and then delivered to each computer independently.

    NAT works more like a large commercial office building, where there's one address for many people. Mail is delivered to the mail room, which sorts it out and delivers it internally to the correct recipient. With NAT, you are assigned one public IP address, and all communications between your LAN and the Internet use this address. The NAT service takes care of changing or translating the IP addresses in data packets from the private, internal IP addresses used on your LAN to the one public address used on the Internet.

    Robert Cowart, Brian Knittel, Using Windows XP Professional (Que Publishing, 3rd ed., 2005), ch. 19, p. 742

    Rick/Portland, OR

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    0 Votes
    Jellimonsta

    I would recommend downloading Solarwinds Subnet Calculator (it can be downloaded for free).
    http://www.solarwinds.com/register/MoreSoftware.aspx?Program=92

    Those addresses look suspect unless the router has the last available IP in the range. With a /28 network a correct subnet would be 192.168.1.144 255.255.255.240.
    That would give you a host range of 192.168.1.145- 192.168.1.158. The first and last address in a network are never used as the first .144 is for 'the wire' and the last, .159 is for broadcast messages.
    So, in principal, if .158 is the last IP in that range, then the other hosts on that network have to fall between .145 and .157.
    Which one is that then?

    Edited to add: You may notice most TR folk do not like helping with 'homework'. You could have most likely googled for this answer yourself, and that is what they are trying to instill.