Questions

how to extend my wireless network to reach my neighbor's pc

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how to extend my wireless network to reach my neighbor's pc

rosalitac
Hello
I'm having a bit of trouble recently. My neighbor wants to share my high speed internet connection over my wireless network but I don't know how to achieve that.
I have my XP pc plugged into my router (DLink WRT54G) in my office and my Vista laptop in the living-room accesses the internet remotely via the router. Now I want to offer my DSL to my neighbor (2 buildings from me, on the same floor) but I don't think it's possible right now. What do I have to install, change ... to make it so? Please I really need your help and expertise. Thanks in advance
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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Typically, with the stock antenna, you can get around 100-125 meters or so. It varies based on building materials (metal/glass/wood) as well as obstructions (trees/cars/elevators).

    It also varies on what wlan adapter and antenna your neighbor has on his/her end of the connection.

    You need to test the connection to see if the signal can reach as-is. Try positioning and locating your router in different locations and orientations to find the best signal.

    If you cannot get a workable signal, there are several options:

    a) better antennas on both your router and the end point PC and/or a better adapter on the PC.

    For example, a USB WLAN adapter can connect via a five or six foot USB cable, allowing the WLAN radio to be placed up above the PC even outside the building if needed.

    Similarly, a higher gain external antenna can be installed on some routers, as long as the antenna is not permanently affixed to the unit.

    b) The other option would be to setup a WLAN access point as a 'repeater'. This would allow you to install some very specific directional antennas facing each other, and could actually allow a WLAN link over several miles, as long as there is 'line of sight' between the two units.

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    OldER Mycroft

    On the geographical level, the logistics of connecting wirelessly depends very much on what linear distance is involved in "2 buildings from me, on the same floor".

    Wireless internal signals degrade beyond 150 feet, externally they can extend to 300 feet. To achieve 300 feet would require an uninterrupted line-of-sight path between the two points.

    Your neighbour would require to be equipped for wireless connection.

    The LEGAL standpoint is somewhat less easy to set up. Your current ISP cgarges you for singular domestic connection to the internet. Within this singular agreement you are permitted to operate a wireless network within the confines of your own domicile. However, the moment you share this access point with another , you break the existing legal agreement.

    To do what you wish would require you notifying your ISP, then paying for a different category of internet connection.

    The response of your ISP is indeterminate until you approach them first.

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    nepenthe0

    Just because it's technically feasible doesn't mean it complies with the terms of the license agreement.

    I have opened my wireless beacon to a neighbor for a few days while he was in the processes of installing his own Internet service. If this is what you wish to do, I doubt there would be a problem. But Old Mycroft's warning is well stated - you risk service termination for knowingly violating the license agreement.

    Rick/Portland, OR

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    robo_dev

    Having to pay actual money for goods and services just takes all the fun out of life.

    Years ago when people had a sense of humor about sharing wifi connections, I wrote a humorous article entitled 'Encrpytion, how rude' about having my feelings hurt by a neighbor who enabled WEP on her WiFi.

    "Was it something I said? I felt like a dog locked out in the rain...."

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    OldER Mycroft

    Sheesh !!

    I never said don't do it - I just pointed out the offishul legal standpoint.

    If I had a penny for every time I've fractured a finite law, or at least placed severe stress on a legal definite article, I'd be a very rich grumpy old fart.

    The choice is up to the individual. I was just covering the salient points, since legally - ignorance is still no anti-litigation excuse.

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    rosalitac

    thank you everyone for your help and comments I think I'm going to help him out for a moment with my internet access but then he will have to find his own because the configuration of the buildings and surroundings makes it difficult to get a signal at his place (only one bar sometimes none on 5 available)

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Typically, with the stock antenna, you can get around 100-125 meters or so. It varies based on building materials (metal/glass/wood) as well as obstructions (trees/cars/elevators).

    It also varies on what wlan adapter and antenna your neighbor has on his/her end of the connection.

    You need to test the connection to see if the signal can reach as-is. Try positioning and locating your router in different locations and orientations to find the best signal.

    If you cannot get a workable signal, there are several options:

    a) better antennas on both your router and the end point PC and/or a better adapter on the PC.

    For example, a USB WLAN adapter can connect via a five or six foot USB cable, allowing the WLAN radio to be placed up above the PC even outside the building if needed.

    Similarly, a higher gain external antenna can be installed on some routers, as long as the antenna is not permanently affixed to the unit.

    b) The other option would be to setup a WLAN access point as a 'repeater'. This would allow you to install some very specific directional antennas facing each other, and could actually allow a WLAN link over several miles, as long as there is 'line of sight' between the two units.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    On the geographical level, the logistics of connecting wirelessly depends very much on what linear distance is involved in "2 buildings from me, on the same floor".

    Wireless internal signals degrade beyond 150 feet, externally they can extend to 300 feet. To achieve 300 feet would require an uninterrupted line-of-sight path between the two points.

    Your neighbour would require to be equipped for wireless connection.

    The LEGAL standpoint is somewhat less easy to set up. Your current ISP cgarges you for singular domestic connection to the internet. Within this singular agreement you are permitted to operate a wireless network within the confines of your own domicile. However, the moment you share this access point with another , you break the existing legal agreement.

    To do what you wish would require you notifying your ISP, then paying for a different category of internet connection.

    The response of your ISP is indeterminate until you approach them first.

    +
    0 Votes
    nepenthe0

    Just because it's technically feasible doesn't mean it complies with the terms of the license agreement.

    I have opened my wireless beacon to a neighbor for a few days while he was in the processes of installing his own Internet service. If this is what you wish to do, I doubt there would be a problem. But Old Mycroft's warning is well stated - you risk service termination for knowingly violating the license agreement.

    Rick/Portland, OR

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Having to pay actual money for goods and services just takes all the fun out of life.

    Years ago when people had a sense of humor about sharing wifi connections, I wrote a humorous article entitled 'Encrpytion, how rude' about having my feelings hurt by a neighbor who enabled WEP on her WiFi.

    "Was it something I said? I felt like a dog locked out in the rain...."

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Sheesh !!

    I never said don't do it - I just pointed out the offishul legal standpoint.

    If I had a penny for every time I've fractured a finite law, or at least placed severe stress on a legal definite article, I'd be a very rich grumpy old fart.

    The choice is up to the individual. I was just covering the salient points, since legally - ignorance is still no anti-litigation excuse.

    +
    0 Votes
    rosalitac

    thank you everyone for your help and comments I think I'm going to help him out for a moment with my internet access but then he will have to find his own because the configuration of the buildings and surroundings makes it difficult to get a signal at his place (only one bar sometimes none on 5 available)