Questions

How to set up a Home web hosting on window 2008 server

+
0 Votes
Locked

How to set up a Home web hosting on window 2008 server

erictechie
I will like to host my own websites at home.I was wondering if someone with the experience will give me some tips.
I need to know if I would require a cisco router or switch. And how many server do I really need for a medium size hosting suit?
  • +
    2 Votes

    OK

    JPElectron

    You need to accomplish the following...

    a) verify your ISP is not blocking port 80 inbound (some ISPs do this intentionally, to prevent you from doing exactly what your trying to do; running a web server at home)
    b) get a static public IP for your home Internet connection (expect to pay a little extra for this), a dynamic IP (one that changes every few days/months) will be too unreliable for this
    c) give your server a static IP on the LAN (using a private address like 192.168.x.x)
    d) install IIS (this is Microsoft's web server software included with server 2008) on your server
    e) setup your website(s) in IIS (one IIS server can server hundreds of websites on just 1 IP address, just so long as none of these sites get extreamly popular (you don't want to run amazon.com from your house)
    f) in your router/firewall port forward HTTP (port 80) to the private IP (192.168.x.x) of your server
    g) register your domain name with a registrar, create two A records for
    example.com
    www.example.com
    ...both pointing to the public IP address of your server
    h) get your server, router, ISP equipment all on a UPS, or better yet a UPS and an auto-start generator

    Easy :-)

    When you outgrow hosting at home, look into virtual servers or cloud servers (you rent a server in someone else's datacenter for $$ per month) or colocation (you rent rack space in a datacenter for $$$$ per month and put your own equipment (routers, servers, back, etc) in there.

    +
    0 Votes
    erictechie

    Thanks JPElectron, I shall do as you have directed.What if I choose to use Apache Server instead of Windows 2008?

    +
    0 Votes
    JPElectron

    The steps are all the same, except for d) you install Apache or a LAMP stack instead and for e) you setup the sites in Apache

    +
    0 Votes
    a.portman

    First, JPElecton has all the steps down from the server to the cloud. Although your ISP probably also has a fixed IP package and will help you set it up.

    Now as to the server. In less than an hour you can have a Linux web server up, running an secure. With very little work you could host several websites from a single server.

    Here are the steps to setting up a Linux LAMP server http://www.ubuntugeek.com/step-by-step-ubuntu-11-04-natty-lamp-server-setup.html The hardest part is burning the CD. You will find a ton of easy to follow LAMP instructions and packages available for Linux. Most are create a folder, upload the file, extract, run the installer, website.

    Good luck and post the URL of your finished site!

    +
    0 Votes
    gechurch

    The response by JPElectron is an excellent rundown (with one very notable ommission - security). I'd recommend not doing it unless you've got a really good reason (like doing it for the learning process). There are heaps of reliable hosts out there and unless you don't value your time at all they will be much cheaper than doing it yourself. Let someone else buy the Cisco router, and worry about uptime, security, backups, cooling, updates etc etc.

  • +
    2 Votes

    OK

    JPElectron

    You need to accomplish the following...

    a) verify your ISP is not blocking port 80 inbound (some ISPs do this intentionally, to prevent you from doing exactly what your trying to do; running a web server at home)
    b) get a static public IP for your home Internet connection (expect to pay a little extra for this), a dynamic IP (one that changes every few days/months) will be too unreliable for this
    c) give your server a static IP on the LAN (using a private address like 192.168.x.x)
    d) install IIS (this is Microsoft's web server software included with server 2008) on your server
    e) setup your website(s) in IIS (one IIS server can server hundreds of websites on just 1 IP address, just so long as none of these sites get extreamly popular (you don't want to run amazon.com from your house)
    f) in your router/firewall port forward HTTP (port 80) to the private IP (192.168.x.x) of your server
    g) register your domain name with a registrar, create two A records for
    example.com
    www.example.com
    ...both pointing to the public IP address of your server
    h) get your server, router, ISP equipment all on a UPS, or better yet a UPS and an auto-start generator

    Easy :-)

    When you outgrow hosting at home, look into virtual servers or cloud servers (you rent a server in someone else's datacenter for $$ per month) or colocation (you rent rack space in a datacenter for $$$$ per month and put your own equipment (routers, servers, back, etc) in there.

    +
    0 Votes
    erictechie

    Thanks JPElectron, I shall do as you have directed.What if I choose to use Apache Server instead of Windows 2008?

    +
    0 Votes
    JPElectron

    The steps are all the same, except for d) you install Apache or a LAMP stack instead and for e) you setup the sites in Apache

    +
    0 Votes
    a.portman

    First, JPElecton has all the steps down from the server to the cloud. Although your ISP probably also has a fixed IP package and will help you set it up.

    Now as to the server. In less than an hour you can have a Linux web server up, running an secure. With very little work you could host several websites from a single server.

    Here are the steps to setting up a Linux LAMP server http://www.ubuntugeek.com/step-by-step-ubuntu-11-04-natty-lamp-server-setup.html The hardest part is burning the CD. You will find a ton of easy to follow LAMP instructions and packages available for Linux. Most are create a folder, upload the file, extract, run the installer, website.

    Good luck and post the URL of your finished site!

    +
    0 Votes
    gechurch

    The response by JPElectron is an excellent rundown (with one very notable ommission - security). I'd recommend not doing it unless you've got a really good reason (like doing it for the learning process). There are heaps of reliable hosts out there and unless you don't value your time at all they will be much cheaper than doing it yourself. Let someone else buy the Cisco router, and worry about uptime, security, backups, cooling, updates etc etc.