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HOw to setup two routers from two different ISPs to share same network

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HOw to setup two routers from two different ISPs to share same network

clarencefm
One of my clients recently subscribed to a second ISP and is connected using a UMAX router (WIMAX). The first Internet service is connected via an ADSL modem. all thier printers (2) are connected on the network through the ADSL router. when the ADSL provider is offline then the client switches to the UMAX provider and subsequently looses printer connectivity. Both routers act as DHCP servers and run a separate IP range:
ADSL router (HUWAEI): DHCP on, 192.168.1.1 -100
WIMAXrouter (Alvarion): DHCP on, 192.168.0.1-254

is there a way i can setup the two routers to be on one network and the client doesnt need to choose which provider to switch to (automatically done?) and never loose printer connectivity.

CFM, Zimbabwe
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    moidcher

    How can share files from two IP addressed routers connected through high Power wireless Outdoor CPE (TP-LINK) , internet is connected, but I want to share some files from both computers connected different routers. How I can start with the first step to last step ? operating systems both computers windows 7 , one router Cisco, other one aztec

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    SmartAceW0LF

    I assume by stating, "when the ADSL provider is offline then the client switches to the UMAX" that you are speaking of your client and not another piece of software. I would suggest that you turn DHCP off on the WIMAX and give it a static IP outside of 192.168.1.100. Be certain to remember the IP you assign so that you dont have problems finding it in order to configure it.

    Will be interesting to see other input from the members here on handling the choice between the 2 providers. Its worthy of noting that the ISP itself is only responsible for delivering its content to the one device. Thus, even if the ISP is down, the ADSL router should continue in its function as DHCP provider. Then the remaining question is how to provide the switch when the ADSL provider goes down. This is where it gets complicated.

    All of the above notwithstanding, you may find it much easier to simply put both "modems" in Bridged Mode which effectively bypasses the router functions of both devices altogether and purchase a router with 2 WAN ports on it. Example tinyurl DOT com/c79ugpk. (Remove the DOT along with the space before and after and replace with a period.) This router will support two WAN connections in either a "load-balancing or failover" capacity.

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    1 Votes
    -gargravarr-

    Have a look at Zero shell http://zeroshell.org/load-balancing-failover/
    I use it for Open VPN but it will act as many things, needs very minimal hardware.

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    1 Votes
    Who Am I Really

    there are Dual WAN port routers that provide load balancing & failover switching etc.

    they can be picked up for under $200.00 (USD)

    you'll have to move the printer connections to the new router
    and do a little network reconfiguration

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    jqbecker

    ...then set it in failover mode. Yes, you will need to configure it for your printers, but not a large task.

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    robo_dev

    Correct; a fundamental part of the TCP/IP protocol is that packets can only follow one route at a time, and the replies to Internet requests from one source have to go back to where they came from.

    Only a dual-wan router can make this work, as it can decide what is the best route for each traffic stream at any given moment.

    You can do bandwidth aggregation at the link layer, not the network layer. A dual wan router can do either failover or load blancing, but cannot aggregate bandwidth.

  • +
    0 Votes
    moidcher

    How can share files from two IP addressed routers connected through high Power wireless Outdoor CPE (TP-LINK) , internet is connected, but I want to share some files from both computers connected different routers. How I can start with the first step to last step ? operating systems both computers windows 7 , one router Cisco, other one aztec

    +
    0 Votes
    SmartAceW0LF

    I assume by stating, "when the ADSL provider is offline then the client switches to the UMAX" that you are speaking of your client and not another piece of software. I would suggest that you turn DHCP off on the WIMAX and give it a static IP outside of 192.168.1.100. Be certain to remember the IP you assign so that you dont have problems finding it in order to configure it.

    Will be interesting to see other input from the members here on handling the choice between the 2 providers. Its worthy of noting that the ISP itself is only responsible for delivering its content to the one device. Thus, even if the ISP is down, the ADSL router should continue in its function as DHCP provider. Then the remaining question is how to provide the switch when the ADSL provider goes down. This is where it gets complicated.

    All of the above notwithstanding, you may find it much easier to simply put both "modems" in Bridged Mode which effectively bypasses the router functions of both devices altogether and purchase a router with 2 WAN ports on it. Example tinyurl DOT com/c79ugpk. (Remove the DOT along with the space before and after and replace with a period.) This router will support two WAN connections in either a "load-balancing or failover" capacity.

    +
    1 Votes
    -gargravarr-

    Have a look at Zero shell http://zeroshell.org/load-balancing-failover/
    I use it for Open VPN but it will act as many things, needs very minimal hardware.

    +
    1 Votes
    Who Am I Really

    there are Dual WAN port routers that provide load balancing & failover switching etc.

    they can be picked up for under $200.00 (USD)

    you'll have to move the printer connections to the new router
    and do a little network reconfiguration

    +
    0 Votes
    jqbecker

    ...then set it in failover mode. Yes, you will need to configure it for your printers, but not a large task.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Correct; a fundamental part of the TCP/IP protocol is that packets can only follow one route at a time, and the replies to Internet requests from one source have to go back to where they came from.

    Only a dual-wan router can make this work, as it can decide what is the best route for each traffic stream at any given moment.

    You can do bandwidth aggregation at the link layer, not the network layer. A dual wan router can do either failover or load blancing, but cannot aggregate bandwidth.