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HP Deskjet Installation Software, 32-bit color?

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HP Deskjet Installation Software, 32-bit color?

Adam S
Perhaps someone with more printer installation knowledge than me can answer the question: Why does printer *installation* software require 32-bit color before it will proceed? More importantly, how do I get around this requirement?

I just bought an HP DeskJet 6988dt. It is networkable and I wanted to use it with some of my older, 1.3Ghz WinXP machines. I never have like HP installation software. I've always considered it bulky and slow. Why do companies insist on crippling their good hardware with bad software?

downloaded the 23MB monster onto a network share and then proceeded to run it on each client. After spending 5 minutes unpacking, it begins to run and then halts, informing me that there are errors.

Colors: Installation requires 32-bit color. You currently have your color depth set too low. Open Display Properties... blah, blah, blah.

Well, these computers only go up to 24-bit color. Why in the world would display color depth be a requirement anyway? The installation doesn't even have any graphics to speak of. This is just insane. What am I missing?
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    Copied from:

    http://www.scala.com/discussions/what-is-32-bit-color-1338.html

    "32-bit color" is for all practical perposes just 24-bit color that is aligned so that the color information for each pixel in the bitmap starts every four bytes vs. every three bytes.

    The only reason this is done is that on the Intel 32-bit PCI/AGP/Memory data bus its more efficient to get at data that is "32-bit aligned". [with 24-bit data you often actually have to read the pixel's data twice--and then mask for the bits you are interested in]

    The "fourth byte" is generally wasted.

    Please post back if you have anymore problems or questions.

  • +
    0 Votes

    Copied from:

    http://www.scala.com/discussions/what-is-32-bit-color-1338.html

    "32-bit color" is for all practical perposes just 24-bit color that is aligned so that the color information for each pixel in the bitmap starts every four bytes vs. every three bytes.

    The only reason this is done is that on the Intel 32-bit PCI/AGP/Memory data bus its more efficient to get at data that is "32-bit aligned". [with 24-bit data you often actually have to read the pixel's data twice--and then mask for the bits you are interested in]

    The "fourth byte" is generally wasted.

    Please post back if you have anymore problems or questions.