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hubs,router,switch

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hubs,router,switch

simple_crazy_najee
i wanted to know which is most preferrable to use in a wireless internet connection. is it hub, router or switch? a connection is only for small office or residential type only. what are the disadvantages or advantages when using each of those.
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    Toivo Talikka

    Forget about hubs, no one uses them any more. Hubs used to propagate the ethernet traffic to all the nodes. Switches direct the packets to MAC (hardware) addresses which basically takes the traffic directly from client A to client B, without bothering client C, unless one of the clients sends a broadcast message.

    Your internet modem may also be acting as a wireless router which has 4 ports for wired connections. In this situation, you can think of the router as a switch which is the default gateway for the IP traffic, wired and wireless.

    If there are not enough ports for your wired connection, you connect a switch to one of the LAN ports of the router. A switch is used purely for connecting network cables from workstations.

    If your internet modem is a modem, with a WAN port and one LAN port, it is still routing LAN traffic to the WAN port and vice versa, but usually the LAN port needs to be connected to the WAN port of a wireless router.

    Pros and cons? Usually the number and type of connections determines the solution, considering what equipment the ISP either supplies or, if they do not supply it, what gear they support.

    Routers usually come with a simple firewall application, which protects the LAN from intrusions.

  • +
    0 Votes
    Toivo Talikka

    Forget about hubs, no one uses them any more. Hubs used to propagate the ethernet traffic to all the nodes. Switches direct the packets to MAC (hardware) addresses which basically takes the traffic directly from client A to client B, without bothering client C, unless one of the clients sends a broadcast message.

    Your internet modem may also be acting as a wireless router which has 4 ports for wired connections. In this situation, you can think of the router as a switch which is the default gateway for the IP traffic, wired and wireless.

    If there are not enough ports for your wired connection, you connect a switch to one of the LAN ports of the router. A switch is used purely for connecting network cables from workstations.

    If your internet modem is a modem, with a WAN port and one LAN port, it is still routing LAN traffic to the WAN port and vice versa, but usually the LAN port needs to be connected to the WAN port of a wireless router.

    Pros and cons? Usually the number and type of connections determines the solution, considering what equipment the ISP either supplies or, if they do not supply it, what gear they support.

    Routers usually come with a simple firewall application, which protects the LAN from intrusions.