Questions

I can browse http://localhost/ but not http://www. from web server?

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I can browse http://localhost/ but not http://www. from web server?

jacodel
Hi,

I'm having a bit of a problem. We have a website and we are currently running without any issues. When I open the browser, I can access the website on the server using http://localhost/ but when I browse to the actual website or the public IP I get a page cannot be displayed. Yet I can browse to any other website from that server, even another website that is being hosted in the same environment.

All our clients can access the website from the outside.

I have checked the windows firewall, the anti virus everything but still no luck.

Any Ideas?

Windows server 2003, IIS 6
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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Did this work at one time, or is this a new install?

    Do you have a proxy server?

    Normally the browser proxy settings would determine if the connection to a local web server happens locally or if it goes externally.

    It does not make sense for a client connection to go outbound to the Internet and come back in on the same interface to get to a web server...that's called hairpinning, and some router/firewalls do not allow it by default.

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    TobiF

    Most probably, your router, your firewall or even the router of your upstream ISP doesn't allow traffic to be routed back from where it came, and instead drops these packets.
    A nice solution, would be to configure your router to direct traffic for your public ip address to the correct internal address.
    A quick fix could be to add the corresponding entries in the host file of your local computer.

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Did this work at one time, or is this a new install?

    Do you have a proxy server?

    Normally the browser proxy settings would determine if the connection to a local web server happens locally or if it goes externally.

    It does not make sense for a client connection to go outbound to the Internet and come back in on the same interface to get to a web server...that's called hairpinning, and some router/firewalls do not allow it by default.

    +
    0 Votes
    TobiF

    Most probably, your router, your firewall or even the router of your upstream ISP doesn't allow traffic to be routed back from where it came, and instead drops these packets.
    A nice solution, would be to configure your router to direct traffic for your public ip address to the correct internal address.
    A quick fix could be to add the corresponding entries in the host file of your local computer.