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Information Systems student looking to enter IT management?

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Information Systems student looking to enter IT management?

strategostechne
Hello Community,

I am an undergrad in Information Systems. I have a passion for technology and its capacity for solutions. I want to help push the envelope of innovation and leadership in technology. Currently I'm working as a technical specialist and also my degree. After I obtain my bachelors I'm looking to start working on my MBA.

I wanted to reach out to the community and see if any of you guys (or gals), whom I have maximum respect for, had any advice on training, certifications, degrees, the future of the industry, career paths, or any other words of wisdom, etc., based on your own experiences.

I appreciate any and all thoughts.

Thank you.
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    robo_dev

    The MBA degree is most valued in the finance and IT audit fields, but not so much for a new-ish person in IT.

    From an 'employability' standpoint, if you get an MBA, the best strategy is to go nights/weekends, as a shiny-new masters-degree with limited experience is not as valuable as you think. (been there, done that).

    In terms of getting started in IT, the better focus would be on certifications. With some marketable certifications, you should be able to get your foot in the door at a larger enterprise or government IT shop where you will, over time, have the opportunity to move to a management position.

    Personally I have a MBA, at least a dozen certifications, and decades of experience. If I had to do it over, I would have gotten more certifications sooner.

    In terms of IT management, all the IT managers I know first earned their stripes as good technical people.

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    JamesRL

    Before you sight your sights on management, set your sights on having a well rounded career in an IT specialty, learn it, and be the best you can be at it.

    If you reach the top of your field and you still have that yearning, why not try project management. That is a good way to see if you enjoy management as much as technology, without having to get too deep in the people management side.

    Don't do your MBA until you've had some business experience behind you. Having faced difficult business decisions will prepare you for the academic work and put it into context.

    Do your training as you need it. If you train for something in advance of your need, you won't get the maximum benefit from it. You will get rusty.

    Take all of this one step at a time. Focus on continually improving your job performance and your knowledge. Assess your self periodically. Find a mentor to guide you, someone who is where you want to be.

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    0 Votes
    JamesRL

    Before you sight your sights on management, set your sights on having a well rounded career in an IT specialty, learn it, and be the best you can be at it.

    If you reach the top of your field and you still have that yearning, why not try project management. That is a good way to see if you enjoy management as much as technology, without having to get too deep in the people management side.

    Don't do your MBA until you've had some business experience behind you. Having faced difficult business decisions will prepare you for the academic work and put it into context.

    Do your training as you need it. If you train for something in advance of your need, you won't get the maximum benefit from it. You will get rusty.

    Take all of this one step at a time. Focus on continually improving your job performance and your knowledge. Assess your self periodically. Find a mentor to guide you, someone who is where you want to be.

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    The MBA degree is most valued in the finance and IT audit fields, but not so much for a new-ish person in IT.

    From an 'employability' standpoint, if you get an MBA, the best strategy is to go nights/weekends, as a shiny-new masters-degree with limited experience is not as valuable as you think. (been there, done that).

    In terms of getting started in IT, the better focus would be on certifications. With some marketable certifications, you should be able to get your foot in the door at a larger enterprise or government IT shop where you will, over time, have the opportunity to move to a management position.

    Personally I have a MBA, at least a dozen certifications, and decades of experience. If I had to do it over, I would have gotten more certifications sooner.

    In terms of IT management, all the IT managers I know first earned their stripes as good technical people.

    +
    0 Votes
    JamesRL

    Before you sight your sights on management, set your sights on having a well rounded career in an IT specialty, learn it, and be the best you can be at it.

    If you reach the top of your field and you still have that yearning, why not try project management. That is a good way to see if you enjoy management as much as technology, without having to get too deep in the people management side.

    Don't do your MBA until you've had some business experience behind you. Having faced difficult business decisions will prepare you for the academic work and put it into context.

    Do your training as you need it. If you train for something in advance of your need, you won't get the maximum benefit from it. You will get rusty.

    Take all of this one step at a time. Focus on continually improving your job performance and your knowledge. Assess your self periodically. Find a mentor to guide you, someone who is where you want to be.

    +
    0 Votes
    JamesRL

    Before you sight your sights on management, set your sights on having a well rounded career in an IT specialty, learn it, and be the best you can be at it.

    If you reach the top of your field and you still have that yearning, why not try project management. That is a good way to see if you enjoy management as much as technology, without having to get too deep in the people management side.

    Don't do your MBA until you've had some business experience behind you. Having faced difficult business decisions will prepare you for the academic work and put it into context.

    Do your training as you need it. If you train for something in advance of your need, you won't get the maximum benefit from it. You will get rusty.

    Take all of this one step at a time. Focus on continually improving your job performance and your knowledge. Assess your self periodically. Find a mentor to guide you, someone who is where you want to be.