Questions

Installing XP

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Installing XP

brian
Here's my situation. I am working on a Sony laptop for a customer. Hard drive went bad. This unit has no internal drives other than the HD. He brought me the external CDROM that plugs into the PCMCIA port. Problem is, thats bad too. Now I have no way to boot this thing. Note: Booting from USB is NOT an option, so please don't suggest it.

What I need to do is find a way to get XP loaded on his HD. I have attempted to pull his HD, format it with FAT32, create a folder called XP and copied the XP CD to it. Then I booted from a DOS floppy, "sys'd" thge HD and put it back in the laptop.

Then I booted from the HD to DOS. So far so good. Then I CD to the XP\i386 folder and run WINNT.EXE and I'm on my way. Problem is, after the restart, not boot! I'm thinking the issue is the fact that the DOS partition is on the same partition as the XP source folder as well as where I'm attempting to install XP.

At this point, I was thinking along the lines of creating 2 partitions; one small partition for the source files and one big one to install XP on. However, Im not sure how the set them up as far as drive letters, etc. I would appreciate any input regarding this dilemma!

Brian
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    0 Votes
    TechExec2

    Hey! Try booting from a USB drive! (joke!) :^0

    -----

    "Problem is, after the restart, not boot! I'm thinking the issue is the fact that the DOS partition is on the same partition as the XP source folder as well as where I'm attempting to install XP."

    I would have expected the reboot after files were copied to work. I don't see why there would be a problem installing XP into the same FAT32 file system as the CD files were in.

    -----

    "At this point, I was thinking along the lines of creating 2 partitions; one small partition for the source files and one big one to install XP on. However, Im not sure how the set them up as far as drive letters, etc. I would appreciate any input regarding this dilemma!"

    You could do this as follows: Created a small FAT32 partition for the Windows XP CD. Run WINNT.EXE from there. During the install, create a second partition (would be a primary partition, occupies the rest of the drive) and isntall XP in that partition. This would essentially be a dual-boot installation. DOS in one partiition, XP in the other. You would just never use the DOS partition again. After installation, you could even delete that partition from within XP.

    After files are copied, the reboot should automatically boot from the Windows XP partition. It should be fine if you want to format that as NTFS during the installation.

    The drive letters should take care of themselves. When the system is booted from the XP partition, that one should be the C drive. You could make the boot choice automatic via Control Panel -> System -> Advanced Tab -> Startup and Recovery -> Default Operating System.

    Good luck!


    P.S. I really hate how difficult it is to install Windows sometimes. X-(

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    brian

    Thanks for the reply. I had tried the approach of loading XP with the HD in my desktop computer but when I stuck it in the laptop, it was hanging at MUP.SYS. But, I didn't disable all the integrated stuff on the desktop so that may have caused the problem.
    So, I created the small FAT partition, copied the XP CD to it then "sys'd" it with a boot floppy. Stuck it back in the laptop then I installed XP on the unused space. Now I have the dual-boot, like you said. Jeez, I've been fighting with this for 3 days. I appreciate the help. It basically reached the point where I was only doing it because I'm stubborn and I told my customer I could. My only regret was that I didn't enable smartdrv and it took like 6 years to copy the files once the install started.

    Brian

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    TechExec2

    Great job! Persistence is part of it, isn't it?

    I'm glad you got it to work.


    P.S. Sorry...I forgot to remind you about SMARTDRV. If it was really so "smart", wouldn't it just be part of DOS all on its own? :^0

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    bcpgm

    You need a laptop HD adaptor (under $10), which allows your HD to connect to a Desktop.

    Use the steps below.

    1. Connect the laptop to the Desktop.
    2. Disconnect any PCI devices. Leave NIC if you do not have an on-board LAN.
    3. Disable any on-board devices (audio, USB, FW, SATA, and so on) except LAN. You have to have one LAN available.
    4. Clean install Windows in the laptop HD and do not activate.
    5. Install LAN driver if necessary.
    6. Go to Sony website and download all the drivers for the SONY laptop and save them.
    7. Navigate to Device Manager and update your current IDE ATA/ATAPI controller to Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller. Do not restart when asked. Uninstall all current chipset devices from System devices. Do not restart when asked. Uninstall all USB devices.
    8. Shut down the computer.
    9. Remove the HD.
    10. Install the HD in the SONY laptop.
    11. Let Windows find the drivers and install the rest from the drivers you saved.
    12. Done!

    I used this method a few times and they were all successful.

    You may have to take care of the CD-ROM problem. Installing any program will be a real pain.

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    bcpgm

    "the laptop" in Step 1 should have been "the laptop HD".

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    brian

    Since my boot partition is C: and the OS is on D:, is there a way to copy the system file from C: to D:, get rid of the small C: partition, change the drive letter to C: and boot from there? I have Acronis Disk Director, FWIW.

    Brian

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    0 Votes
    TechExec2

    You might be able to do it like this:

    1. Copy the boot files to the XP volume manually (IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, NTDETECT.COM, ntldr, etc).

    2. Manually edit boot.ini so it reflects the state of the partitions that will exist after step 3.

    3. Run Partition Magic from a boot floppy. Delete the small C volume, move the large D volume to the "left" (beginning of the drive), enlarge the D volume to occupy all of the space. Using Partition Magic, you should also be able to ensure that the single remaining partition is the active primary partition.

    Note: I've never used Acronis Disk Director. Looks like it is equivalent to Partition Magic and you should be able to do the same thing if it can be run from a DOS boot floppy.

    4. If necessary, boot to DOS, run "fdisk /mbr" to repair the partition table.

    5. Reboot.

    After the last step, the system should boot to XP. I have had mixed results in playing around with XP booting like this.

    -----

    If you find that you cannot get the above to work, you might choose to leave the boot configuration alone and merely reclaim most of the space from the small DOS partition. You could do this by deleting the CD files from the small DOS partition, running Partition Magic to reduce the size of the small DOS partition and to relocate and enlarge the large NTFS partition.

    -----

    I want it! I want it ALL!!! :^0

    Sign of a persistent technician (...who doesn't mind working for $1.32 per hour in order to "win"...been there too...as you can see! :^0...)

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    brian

    This is a really small sony LT and I'm not really too keen on pulling the HD again, so I think I will leave well enough alone. Besides, at this point, I'm down to $1.29/Hr. LOL. But, hey, its always a good learning experience and the customer can salvage a laptop.

    BTW, the reason I couldn't use USB is because the drive he brought me (its the original external, PCMCIA Sony CD drive) wouldn't power up from the git-go. And this thing is too old to boot from USB, so that should clarify my former prediciment.

    I don't guess I have to close this topic. It appears TR revamped their site and did away with the point system?

    Brian

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    0 Votes
    PGS-AU

    As HDs these days are so big, I generally partition them into 3.
    C:\Apps
    D:\Data
    E:\Drivers
    Copy the i386 folder to E:\
    One can then boot to a floppy/usb drive & run the install from E:\i386.

  • +
    0 Votes
    TechExec2

    Hey! Try booting from a USB drive! (joke!) :^0

    -----

    "Problem is, after the restart, not boot! I'm thinking the issue is the fact that the DOS partition is on the same partition as the XP source folder as well as where I'm attempting to install XP."

    I would have expected the reboot after files were copied to work. I don't see why there would be a problem installing XP into the same FAT32 file system as the CD files were in.

    -----

    "At this point, I was thinking along the lines of creating 2 partitions; one small partition for the source files and one big one to install XP on. However, Im not sure how the set them up as far as drive letters, etc. I would appreciate any input regarding this dilemma!"

    You could do this as follows: Created a small FAT32 partition for the Windows XP CD. Run WINNT.EXE from there. During the install, create a second partition (would be a primary partition, occupies the rest of the drive) and isntall XP in that partition. This would essentially be a dual-boot installation. DOS in one partiition, XP in the other. You would just never use the DOS partition again. After installation, you could even delete that partition from within XP.

    After files are copied, the reboot should automatically boot from the Windows XP partition. It should be fine if you want to format that as NTFS during the installation.

    The drive letters should take care of themselves. When the system is booted from the XP partition, that one should be the C drive. You could make the boot choice automatic via Control Panel -> System -> Advanced Tab -> Startup and Recovery -> Default Operating System.

    Good luck!


    P.S. I really hate how difficult it is to install Windows sometimes. X-(

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Thanks for the reply. I had tried the approach of loading XP with the HD in my desktop computer but when I stuck it in the laptop, it was hanging at MUP.SYS. But, I didn't disable all the integrated stuff on the desktop so that may have caused the problem.
    So, I created the small FAT partition, copied the XP CD to it then "sys'd" it with a boot floppy. Stuck it back in the laptop then I installed XP on the unused space. Now I have the dual-boot, like you said. Jeez, I've been fighting with this for 3 days. I appreciate the help. It basically reached the point where I was only doing it because I'm stubborn and I told my customer I could. My only regret was that I didn't enable smartdrv and it took like 6 years to copy the files once the install started.

    Brian

    +
    0 Votes
    TechExec2

    Great job! Persistence is part of it, isn't it?

    I'm glad you got it to work.


    P.S. Sorry...I forgot to remind you about SMARTDRV. If it was really so "smart", wouldn't it just be part of DOS all on its own? :^0

    +
    0 Votes
    bcpgm

    You need a laptop HD adaptor (under $10), which allows your HD to connect to a Desktop.

    Use the steps below.

    1. Connect the laptop to the Desktop.
    2. Disconnect any PCI devices. Leave NIC if you do not have an on-board LAN.
    3. Disable any on-board devices (audio, USB, FW, SATA, and so on) except LAN. You have to have one LAN available.
    4. Clean install Windows in the laptop HD and do not activate.
    5. Install LAN driver if necessary.
    6. Go to Sony website and download all the drivers for the SONY laptop and save them.
    7. Navigate to Device Manager and update your current IDE ATA/ATAPI controller to Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller. Do not restart when asked. Uninstall all current chipset devices from System devices. Do not restart when asked. Uninstall all USB devices.
    8. Shut down the computer.
    9. Remove the HD.
    10. Install the HD in the SONY laptop.
    11. Let Windows find the drivers and install the rest from the drivers you saved.
    12. Done!

    I used this method a few times and they were all successful.

    You may have to take care of the CD-ROM problem. Installing any program will be a real pain.

    +
    0 Votes
    bcpgm

    "the laptop" in Step 1 should have been "the laptop HD".

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    Since my boot partition is C: and the OS is on D:, is there a way to copy the system file from C: to D:, get rid of the small C: partition, change the drive letter to C: and boot from there? I have Acronis Disk Director, FWIW.

    Brian

    +
    0 Votes
    TechExec2

    You might be able to do it like this:

    1. Copy the boot files to the XP volume manually (IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, NTDETECT.COM, ntldr, etc).

    2. Manually edit boot.ini so it reflects the state of the partitions that will exist after step 3.

    3. Run Partition Magic from a boot floppy. Delete the small C volume, move the large D volume to the "left" (beginning of the drive), enlarge the D volume to occupy all of the space. Using Partition Magic, you should also be able to ensure that the single remaining partition is the active primary partition.

    Note: I've never used Acronis Disk Director. Looks like it is equivalent to Partition Magic and you should be able to do the same thing if it can be run from a DOS boot floppy.

    4. If necessary, boot to DOS, run "fdisk /mbr" to repair the partition table.

    5. Reboot.

    After the last step, the system should boot to XP. I have had mixed results in playing around with XP booting like this.

    -----

    If you find that you cannot get the above to work, you might choose to leave the boot configuration alone and merely reclaim most of the space from the small DOS partition. You could do this by deleting the CD files from the small DOS partition, running Partition Magic to reduce the size of the small DOS partition and to relocate and enlarge the large NTFS partition.

    -----

    I want it! I want it ALL!!! :^0

    Sign of a persistent technician (...who doesn't mind working for $1.32 per hour in order to "win"...been there too...as you can see! :^0...)

    +
    0 Votes
    brian

    This is a really small sony LT and I'm not really too keen on pulling the HD again, so I think I will leave well enough alone. Besides, at this point, I'm down to $1.29/Hr. LOL. But, hey, its always a good learning experience and the customer can salvage a laptop.

    BTW, the reason I couldn't use USB is because the drive he brought me (its the original external, PCMCIA Sony CD drive) wouldn't power up from the git-go. And this thing is too old to boot from USB, so that should clarify my former prediciment.

    I don't guess I have to close this topic. It appears TR revamped their site and did away with the point system?

    Brian

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    0 Votes
    PGS-AU

    As HDs these days are so big, I generally partition them into 3.
    C:\Apps
    D:\Data
    E:\Drivers
    Copy the i386 folder to E:\
    One can then boot to a floppy/usb drive & run the install from E:\i386.