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ip address range

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ip address range

Aavarice
an ip address is divided into network id and host id..! everyone knows that. for a class A ip address the range is 2 power 7 i.e., 127... since the 8th bit of first octet is set to 0 and hence remaining are 7 bits so 2 is powered by 7 and range is 127 max.
how is the range calculated for class B and class C?? rnage of class B is from 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.25.255.. how is it determined tat range of class B is from 127 to 191?? how is it calculated..? can any one plzzz help me??


thanks in advance..!!
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    2 Votes
    PurpleSkys Moderator

    the questions Aavarice is posting are home/school work type stuff?

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    Rob Kuhn

    :)

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    gdeangelis

    Seems like a few postings in these forums match what you are hinting at...right out of the text book

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    hm.

    Rob Kuhn

    isn't the power just doubled and tripled for the respected class?

    2^14 for class B and 2^21 for class C. That at least gives us the number of possible network IDs for each of the respected classes.

    Since I suspect that PurpleSkys is correct, can you, Aavarice, figure out what the number of host IDs per network ID is for each of the respected classes are?

    Hint:

    Class A: Total number of network ID: 8, Host ID: 24
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Class B: Total number of network ID: 16, Host ID: 16
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Class C: Total number of network ID: 24, Host ID 8
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Should be fairly simple. :)

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    Aavarice

    here are your answers..

    Class A: Total number of network ID: 8, Host ID: 24
    Answer: 2^(7) - 2

    Class B: Total number of network ID: 16, Host ID: 16
    Answer: 2^(14) - 2

    Class C: Total number of network ID: 24, Host ID 8
    Answer: 2^(21) - 2
    i gues no one understood my question... may b fault is with my communication

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    NetMan1958

    is that the IPv4 classes were derived by the following rules:
    Class A - Always begins with a 0 (zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    00000001 (1) to 01111111 (127)

    Class B - Always begins with 10 (0ne-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    10000000 (128) to 10111111 (191)

    Class C - Always begins with 110 (One-one-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    11000000 (192) to 11011111 (223)

    Class D - Always begins with 1110 (one-one-one-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields 11100000 (224) to 11101111 (239)

    Class E - Always begins with 1111 (0ne-one-one-one) when expressed in binary - So that yields 11110000 (240) to 11111111 (255)

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    Deadly Ernest

    decimal representation of IP address is four numbers (eg 100.102.103.104) each group goes from 0 to 256. Due to management reasons two addresses are reserved within every network or sub-network, so the available numbers for use in any group is two less, or only 254 for a Class A. 8 bits to the byte means 2 to the 8th power, minus two unique addresses for admin = 254 not 127 as set out in the question.

    Class A means the IP address is in the first group (100 above - shown as 100.xxx.xxx.xxx) and all the options available in the other three groups are part of it. Thus a class 1 address has only 254 available address, but within that Class A address the owner has 254 x 254 x 254 address available to them to use, or 16,387,064 addresses within their own group.

    Class B means the IP address is a sub-group of a Class A and is in the second group (102 above - shown as 100.102.xxx.xxx ) and with 254 options within that sub group, but has 254 x 254 addresses open to it to use, or 64,516 addresses within it's group.

    Class C means the IP address is a sub-group of Class B and is in the third group (103 above - shown as 100.102.103.xxx) and has only 254 options within that sub-group and only 254 address open to use within it.

    Class D is a sub-net of Class C and reduces one more binary spot within the Class C, and Class E is the same again but down another binary spot. Total for a Class D is 128 - 2 or 126 addresses while Class E is 64 - 2 or 62 addresses.
    ..........

    Now having said all that, some address ranges are reserved and will NOT be recognised by Internet routers because of that.
    The 127.0.0.0 is admin reserved; the 10.xxx.xxx.xxx is the Class A internal network reserved; there is a Class B reserved one that I can't remember off hand, but think it may be 172.1.xxx.xxx; there is a Class C reserved of 192.168.0.xxx - - in each of these the x represents a number where you can substitute your own for use on your internal network.

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    Aavarice

    hmm.. i found and learnt what i want..
    if anybody wants to know how go to this URL tat i m posting.. u'll get ur answers

    http://www.firstnetsecurity.com/library/misc/TutorialMaster.PDF

    and to know detailed info abt how ip subnetting is done go thru this URL

    http://www.itdojo.com/synner/pdf/Subnetting%20by%20Colin.pdf

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    2 Votes
    PurpleSkys Moderator

    the questions Aavarice is posting are home/school work type stuff?

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    0 Votes
    Rob Kuhn

    :)

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    0 Votes
    gdeangelis

    Seems like a few postings in these forums match what you are hinting at...right out of the text book

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    0 Votes

    hm.

    Rob Kuhn

    isn't the power just doubled and tripled for the respected class?

    2^14 for class B and 2^21 for class C. That at least gives us the number of possible network IDs for each of the respected classes.

    Since I suspect that PurpleSkys is correct, can you, Aavarice, figure out what the number of host IDs per network ID is for each of the respected classes are?

    Hint:

    Class A: Total number of network ID: 8, Host ID: 24
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Class B: Total number of network ID: 16, Host ID: 16
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Class C: Total number of network ID: 24, Host ID 8
    Answer: 2^(what power) - 2

    Should be fairly simple. :)

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    Aavarice

    here are your answers..

    Class A: Total number of network ID: 8, Host ID: 24
    Answer: 2^(7) - 2

    Class B: Total number of network ID: 16, Host ID: 16
    Answer: 2^(14) - 2

    Class C: Total number of network ID: 24, Host ID 8
    Answer: 2^(21) - 2
    i gues no one understood my question... may b fault is with my communication

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    0 Votes
    NetMan1958

    is that the IPv4 classes were derived by the following rules:
    Class A - Always begins with a 0 (zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    00000001 (1) to 01111111 (127)

    Class B - Always begins with 10 (0ne-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    10000000 (128) to 10111111 (191)

    Class C - Always begins with 110 (One-one-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields
    11000000 (192) to 11011111 (223)

    Class D - Always begins with 1110 (one-one-one-zero) when expressed in binary - So that yields 11100000 (224) to 11101111 (239)

    Class E - Always begins with 1111 (0ne-one-one-one) when expressed in binary - So that yields 11110000 (240) to 11111111 (255)

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    Deadly Ernest

    decimal representation of IP address is four numbers (eg 100.102.103.104) each group goes from 0 to 256. Due to management reasons two addresses are reserved within every network or sub-network, so the available numbers for use in any group is two less, or only 254 for a Class A. 8 bits to the byte means 2 to the 8th power, minus two unique addresses for admin = 254 not 127 as set out in the question.

    Class A means the IP address is in the first group (100 above - shown as 100.xxx.xxx.xxx) and all the options available in the other three groups are part of it. Thus a class 1 address has only 254 available address, but within that Class A address the owner has 254 x 254 x 254 address available to them to use, or 16,387,064 addresses within their own group.

    Class B means the IP address is a sub-group of a Class A and is in the second group (102 above - shown as 100.102.xxx.xxx ) and with 254 options within that sub group, but has 254 x 254 addresses open to it to use, or 64,516 addresses within it's group.

    Class C means the IP address is a sub-group of Class B and is in the third group (103 above - shown as 100.102.103.xxx) and has only 254 options within that sub-group and only 254 address open to use within it.

    Class D is a sub-net of Class C and reduces one more binary spot within the Class C, and Class E is the same again but down another binary spot. Total for a Class D is 128 - 2 or 126 addresses while Class E is 64 - 2 or 62 addresses.
    ..........

    Now having said all that, some address ranges are reserved and will NOT be recognised by Internet routers because of that.
    The 127.0.0.0 is admin reserved; the 10.xxx.xxx.xxx is the Class A internal network reserved; there is a Class B reserved one that I can't remember off hand, but think it may be 172.1.xxx.xxx; there is a Class C reserved of 192.168.0.xxx - - in each of these the x represents a number where you can substitute your own for use on your internal network.

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    0 Votes
    Aavarice

    hmm.. i found and learnt what i want..
    if anybody wants to know how go to this URL tat i m posting.. u'll get ur answers

    http://www.firstnetsecurity.com/library/misc/TutorialMaster.PDF

    and to know detailed info abt how ip subnetting is done go thru this URL

    http://www.itdojo.com/synner/pdf/Subnetting%20by%20Colin.pdf