Questions

IP History

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IP History

walse001
I need a program that will allow me to remotely track the internet sites visited by IP address. A student at my school wants his own personal laptop connected, but I need to know what internet sites he visits (For Duty of care). Is there a program I can use to track the websites visited by a specific IP?

Thanks
  • +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    You weren't so secretive as to your own whereabouts.

    +
    0 Votes
    walse001

    Sorry about that, I didn't even realise! My Auto-complete is wrong... Don't know why seamonkey includes those defaults...

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    if you don't trust the kid, don't give them access.

    I am sure you have filters for your web traffic if your a school, that block access to "bad" sites, and that should be enough.

    what is a valid reason to know EVERYWHERE the kid goes?

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    As the saying goes, or at least it should.

    Whatever happened to the innocence of youth, and education broadening the mind.

    Big Brother is all around. Woo-Hoo-...

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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Not to get off on a rant, but:

    //begin rant//

    I wish we could say that today's youth are safe from predators, but they are not.

    The 'free and open' communication paths that make the Internet such a powerful tool for the average user also allow these predators into the home, even the bedrooms of our children.

    Sadly, many parents don't know an 'IM' from an M&M and their kids are probably chatting with some other "teen" online, whilst the parents feel all snug and secure because they spent $39.95 for NetNanny or some similarly useless filtering tool.

    (This "teen", of course, was a teen back in the 1960s).

    So I argue that there is no such thing as being too vigilant with respect to the online threats facing today's youth.

    Big Brother? You bet.

    //end rant//

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    They didn't have computers.

    They did however have their preferred method of approach, even back then.

    They were also dealt with back then.

    IMHO it's not the fault of 'Net access, or computers - it's the fault of the Law of the Land, which needs to be refined to bring about heavier sentences to deter these weirdos.

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    0 Votes
    TonytheTiger

    it was rare that one of these perps even made it to booking, let alone be sentenced :)

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Sorry to open this Pandora's box of discussion...

    +
    0 Votes
    Dumphrey

    met with some form of "accident" while in transit or jail.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Is mostly to blame.

    Don't get me wrong, I am not insensitive to the predicament faced by parents these days. I myself am childless but have enjoyed witnessing my nephews and nieces grow up.


    I reckon there is ONE salient point here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.


    I reckon there are TWO salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."


    I reckon there are THREE salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."

    3. We now have instances of prisoners in gaol going on strike, protesting at not having access to the internet! This is nonsensical when a proportion of them are serving sentences for paedophilia-related crimes. It is though, somehow accepted.


    I reckon there are FOUR salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."

    3. We now have instances of prisoners in gaol going on strike, protesting at not having access to the internet! This is nonsensical when a proportion of them are serving sentences for pedophilia-related crimes. It is though, somehow accepted.

    4. Due to points 1, 2, and 3 we now don't realise that in the old days things were exactly the same - it's really just that we didn't hear about it quite as much, or indeed quite as quickly, and the 'system' had ways of dealing with it before it became public knowledge, without any perv shouting 'brutality' and claiming compensation.

    :::::
    :::::

    On reflection I reckon we don't live in an 'Ambulance Chasing' society, I reckon we live in a 'Spanish Inquisition Society': as we strive to develop our technologies, better our lives, create an easier existence for all (well, all of the developed world!), we consequently also witness the seedier side of life at first hand and accept it, or fight against it secretly accepting that it is an insurmountable opponent.

    Personally I reckon I'm happy to be the age that I currently am - at least I won't be around by the time this brave new world has gone to **** in a hand-basket.

    ...Just my opinion, mind.


    <Layout and tabulation>

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    This software works very very well. Have used it extensively.

    http://www.spectorsoft.com

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Certainly illegal!

    The kid's not gonna openly allow the program to be installed on his own laptop.

    If I caught someone doin' that to my laptop I'd ask them to "pick a window" ...coz they were leaving!

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    The case here is that the admin has to be able to track what sites the user goes to. He can tell the user that he has to install software to do that.

    Many organizations have a policy that all network and email usage is subject to monitoring, and make their users aware of the policy.

    The more logical solution, obviously, is a to have a proxy server that restricts/logs all sites.

    But the user asked a more general 'everything done on the laptop' question...therefore eblaster is the solution.

    Technically, eblaster is very impressive. I might add that it should only be used for legal and legitimate purposes.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    When the school bell rings and the kids all go home?

    Little Johnnie goes home with his laptop and everything he does on that laptop when he's NOT at school, including family use, siblings, friends, ALL come under the scrutiny of one teacher who just wants to 'have a look'?

    I don't think so.

    +
    0 Votes
    Bizzo

    I think the only option open to the OP is to refuse to allow the kid to connect his laptop to the school network.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Maybe just give the user a green-screen dumb terminal?

    Not much porn can be viewed with ASCII art.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Mind you, back in 1983 that was ground-breaking!

    Ohhh... raster scans and parallax scrolling <shudders!!>

    +
    0 Votes
    Dumphrey

    but only because I can se no way to cheaply and easily create an "unsafe" network for kids to use. It would have to be labeled as public, and filtered and logged at the gateway by a transparent proxy... at the minimum. But the teacher has no right to install anything on the laptop. Also, by allowing this one boy to attach his laptop, he will have to allow anyone else to as well, or else he is showing favoritism. And that means a whole new bag of security worms.
    A school admin has a lot of pressure to filter content and track access for legal COA grounds for the school (and the admin). And on that ground alone I would refuse to allow private computers.

    +
    0 Votes
    PlipO

    I am protective of my laptop as well but I would not go as far as homicide to protect it.
    I'll search for a freeware app that can do the job.
    I'm sure I've used a similar tooling the past with the express intention of education of course.

    +
    0 Votes
    susanal

    You must certainly use a remote spy software, it can be installed remotely install the monitoring software on any computer you own and access the activity logs from anywhere at any time via your own personal Remote Spy Software Webspace!
    http://www.remote-pc-spy.com/

  • +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    You weren't so secretive as to your own whereabouts.

    +
    0 Votes
    walse001

    Sorry about that, I didn't even realise! My Auto-complete is wrong... Don't know why seamonkey includes those defaults...

    +
    0 Votes
    jdclyde

    if you don't trust the kid, don't give them access.

    I am sure you have filters for your web traffic if your a school, that block access to "bad" sites, and that should be enough.

    what is a valid reason to know EVERYWHERE the kid goes?

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    As the saying goes, or at least it should.

    Whatever happened to the innocence of youth, and education broadening the mind.

    Big Brother is all around. Woo-Hoo-...

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Not to get off on a rant, but:

    //begin rant//

    I wish we could say that today's youth are safe from predators, but they are not.

    The 'free and open' communication paths that make the Internet such a powerful tool for the average user also allow these predators into the home, even the bedrooms of our children.

    Sadly, many parents don't know an 'IM' from an M&M and their kids are probably chatting with some other "teen" online, whilst the parents feel all snug and secure because they spent $39.95 for NetNanny or some similarly useless filtering tool.

    (This "teen", of course, was a teen back in the 1960s).

    So I argue that there is no such thing as being too vigilant with respect to the online threats facing today's youth.

    Big Brother? You bet.

    //end rant//

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    They didn't have computers.

    They did however have their preferred method of approach, even back then.

    They were also dealt with back then.

    IMHO it's not the fault of 'Net access, or computers - it's the fault of the Law of the Land, which needs to be refined to bring about heavier sentences to deter these weirdos.

    +
    0 Votes
    TonytheTiger

    it was rare that one of these perps even made it to booking, let alone be sentenced :)

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Sorry to open this Pandora's box of discussion...

    +
    0 Votes
    Dumphrey

    met with some form of "accident" while in transit or jail.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Is mostly to blame.

    Don't get me wrong, I am not insensitive to the predicament faced by parents these days. I myself am childless but have enjoyed witnessing my nephews and nieces grow up.


    I reckon there is ONE salient point here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.


    I reckon there are TWO salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."


    I reckon there are THREE salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."

    3. We now have instances of prisoners in gaol going on strike, protesting at not having access to the internet! This is nonsensical when a proportion of them are serving sentences for paedophilia-related crimes. It is though, somehow accepted.


    I reckon there are FOUR salient points here:

    1. Information is both more freely available AND much more instant these days. You can now witness live coverage of a news event as it happens in some cases.

    2. We currently live in a society that promotes the claiming of compensation at the slightest hint of responsibility for an accident or wrong-doing. "Did you have an accident at work? Call ......."

    3. We now have instances of prisoners in gaol going on strike, protesting at not having access to the internet! This is nonsensical when a proportion of them are serving sentences for pedophilia-related crimes. It is though, somehow accepted.

    4. Due to points 1, 2, and 3 we now don't realise that in the old days things were exactly the same - it's really just that we didn't hear about it quite as much, or indeed quite as quickly, and the 'system' had ways of dealing with it before it became public knowledge, without any perv shouting 'brutality' and claiming compensation.

    :::::
    :::::

    On reflection I reckon we don't live in an 'Ambulance Chasing' society, I reckon we live in a 'Spanish Inquisition Society': as we strive to develop our technologies, better our lives, create an easier existence for all (well, all of the developed world!), we consequently also witness the seedier side of life at first hand and accept it, or fight against it secretly accepting that it is an insurmountable opponent.

    Personally I reckon I'm happy to be the age that I currently am - at least I won't be around by the time this brave new world has gone to **** in a hand-basket.

    ...Just my opinion, mind.


    <Layout and tabulation>

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    This software works very very well. Have used it extensively.

    http://www.spectorsoft.com

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Certainly illegal!

    The kid's not gonna openly allow the program to be installed on his own laptop.

    If I caught someone doin' that to my laptop I'd ask them to "pick a window" ...coz they were leaving!

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    The case here is that the admin has to be able to track what sites the user goes to. He can tell the user that he has to install software to do that.

    Many organizations have a policy that all network and email usage is subject to monitoring, and make their users aware of the policy.

    The more logical solution, obviously, is a to have a proxy server that restricts/logs all sites.

    But the user asked a more general 'everything done on the laptop' question...therefore eblaster is the solution.

    Technically, eblaster is very impressive. I might add that it should only be used for legal and legitimate purposes.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    When the school bell rings and the kids all go home?

    Little Johnnie goes home with his laptop and everything he does on that laptop when he's NOT at school, including family use, siblings, friends, ALL come under the scrutiny of one teacher who just wants to 'have a look'?

    I don't think so.

    +
    0 Votes
    Bizzo

    I think the only option open to the OP is to refuse to allow the kid to connect his laptop to the school network.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Maybe just give the user a green-screen dumb terminal?

    Not much porn can be viewed with ASCII art.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Mind you, back in 1983 that was ground-breaking!

    Ohhh... raster scans and parallax scrolling <shudders!!>

    +
    0 Votes
    Dumphrey

    but only because I can se no way to cheaply and easily create an "unsafe" network for kids to use. It would have to be labeled as public, and filtered and logged at the gateway by a transparent proxy... at the minimum. But the teacher has no right to install anything on the laptop. Also, by allowing this one boy to attach his laptop, he will have to allow anyone else to as well, or else he is showing favoritism. And that means a whole new bag of security worms.
    A school admin has a lot of pressure to filter content and track access for legal COA grounds for the school (and the admin). And on that ground alone I would refuse to allow private computers.

    +
    0 Votes
    PlipO

    I am protective of my laptop as well but I would not go as far as homicide to protect it.
    I'll search for a freeware app that can do the job.
    I'm sure I've used a similar tooling the past with the express intention of education of course.

    +
    0 Votes
    susanal

    You must certainly use a remote spy software, it can be installed remotely install the monitoring software on any computer you own and access the activity logs from anywhere at any time via your own personal Remote Spy Software Webspace!
    http://www.remote-pc-spy.com/